Categories for 2019
SLHA News ...
News 2019
Lectures and Conferences

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Paul Robinson, OBE, retired air vice-marshal, spoke to SLHA members at St Hugh’s Hall, Lincoln on 13 February. There were 27 bases within the Lincolnshire (widely known as ‘Bomber County’) from which bomber aircraft flew in WW2 and it is fitting that the national memorial and archive should be located close to Lincoln.

As the war progressed the design and capabilities of bomber aircraft developed rapidly and the ability to pinpoint enemy targets improved considerably.  Nevertheless huge numbers of aircraft and men were lost; out of nearly 9000 bombers which were shot down or crashed, 3500 were from Lincolnshire airfields. Pilots and aircrew had a very low life expectancy and it is their bravery and fortitude that are commemorated in particular at the new IBCC.


Photo: The principal memorial and record of names at the IBCC

February 2019

Aerial Photography
A tool in the study of archaeology

‘Unlocking the Power of Aerial Photography’ was the title of a short talk given by Kathryn Murphy* at a Sunday Special in Lincoln on 20 January. This useful technique ‘took off’ in the First World War and in a short time its value as a tool for revealing and understanding archaeological sites was recognised. Millions of aerial images, either vertical or oblique, have now been collected and are available for study.

Shadows cast by small undulations in grassland indicate the layout of sites such as deserted medieval villages, and variations in crop growth in cultivated land can indicate the location of long-buried structures. Exceptionally dry periods also give rise to differential growth and maturing rates of grass in sites of buried archaeology.

The more recent technique of LIDAR has added considerably to the benefits of aerial photography.

* Kathryn Murphy is Assistant Officer for the Historic Enviroment Records, Lincoln

January 2019

Buildings and Pilgrimage
Medieval buildings in Walsingham, Norfolk

Little Walsingham in north Norfolk has been a place of pilgrimage since the building of the priory in the twelfth century. Several medieval buildings related to hospitality for pilgrims survive in the town and have been the subject of recent study by the Norfolk Historic Buildings Group.

Ian Hinton, a leading member of NHBG, gave an illustrated talk on these buildings to SLHA members in Lincoln on 16 January. Many of the buildings are timber-framed, exhibiting a range of structural styles and decoration. A variety of trusses, dragon posts, staircases and wall paintings were illustrated by Ian in this enjoyable and informative presentation.

Photo: SLHA members on a visit to Walsingham in 2017 

 


January 2019