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Archaeology - Anglo-Saxon
 
Colsterworth, St John Baptist, Saxon stone
Colsterworth, St John Baptist, Saxon stone
Colsterworth, St John Baptist, Saxon stone

A section of a small cross shaft from c.950-1050.

March 2017

Colsterworth, Saxon stone, St John Baptist church
Cranwell, St Andrew, Saxon stones
Cranwell, St Andrew, Saxon stones
Cranwell, St Andrew, Saxon stones

Three of these pieces of Saxon sculpture are from a grave cover and the fourth from a cross shaft.

June 2017

Cranwell, St Andrew, Saxon stones
Creeton, St Peter, standing stone
Creeton, St Peter, standing stone
Creeton, St Peter, standing stone

Part of an Anglo-Saxon cross shaft.

Mark Acton, 2017

Creeton, St Peter, standing stone
Creeton, St Peter, standing stone
Creeton, St Peter, standing stone
Creeton, St Peter, standing stone

Part of an Anglo-Saxon cross shaft.

Mark Acton, 2017

Creeton, St Peter standing stone
Crowle, St Oswald, Saxon stone
Crowle, St Oswald, Saxon stone
Crowle, St Oswald, Saxon stone

This is an Anglo-Saxon cross shaft of Viking inspiration, probably dating from the eleventh century.

The face to the left (facing north) carries a heavy interlace pattern.

August 2015

 

Crowle, St Oswald church, Saxon stone
Dowsby, St&nbspAndrew, Saxon interlace
Dowsby, St Andrew, Saxon interlace
Dowsby, St Andrew, Saxon interlace

These four fragments with interlace patterns of the Saxon period are on the east wall of the south aisle.

October 2017

Dowsby, St Andrew, Saxon interlace
Gayton le Wold, St Peter, Anglo Saxon Sculpture
Gayton le Wold, St Peter, Anglo Saxon Sculpture
Gayton le Wold, St Peter, Anglo Saxon Sculpture
Low relief cross, a fragment of C10 Anglo Saxon Sculpture, situated immediately adjacent to south side of the porch. 
 
DB 7 February 2018 
Gayton Le Wold, St Peter church, Anglo Saxon sculpture, Cross
Horncastle, Anglo Saxon coin pendant
Horncastle, Anglo Saxon coin pendant
Horncastle, Anglo Saxon coin pendant

This pendant was discovered near Horncastle in 2012, and its unorthodox appearance is due to its long history of reuse.

Although the pendant is 6th or 7th Century in date, its life began as a coin in Iron Age Gaul.  The coin was minted in c.70-60BC by the Suessiones tribe.

A male portrait with a strong nose and wavy hair is still clearly visible; on the reverse, the original lion motif is now less so.

We cannot know what happened between the coinís original manufacture and its Anglo Saxon conversion into a pendant, or at what point it entered Lincolnshire, but it was converted through gilding and the addition of a suspension loop and three collets containing inset glass and garnets.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Horncastle, Anglo Saxon coin pendant, Suessiones tribe, lion motif
Kirkby Underwood, St Mary & All Saints, interlace
Kirkby Underwood, St Mary & All Saints, interlace
Kirkby Underwood, St Mary & All Saints, interlace

A small fragment of Saxon interlace decoration, probably from a cross shaft, built into the east wall of the church.

October 2017

Kirkby Underwood, St Mary & All Saints, Saxon interlace, cross shaft
Lincoln, Anglo Saxon coin die
Lincoln, Anglo Saxon coin die
Lincoln, Anglo Saxon coin die

This unattractive iron block is actually a coin die, one half of a pair used for striking coins.

This die was discovered on Flaxengate in Lincoln and was used to strike coins for Aethelred II (968-1016).  It is the die for the reverse of the coin.

Lincolnís coin mint was in operation from c.890 Ė 1279 and was one of the most productive in the country, with only London having more moneyers in some periods.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Archaeology, Lincoln Flaxengate, Aethelred, coin die, mint
Stoke Rochford, St Mary & St Andrew, Saxon Cross
Stoke Rochford, St Mary & St Andrew, Saxon Cross
Stoke Rochford, St Mary & St Andrew, Saxon Cross

Saxon Cross in churchyard - scheduled ancient monument. 

DB 17 May 2018

Stoke Rochford, St Mary & St Andrew, Churchyard, saxon cross
Tattershall Thorpe, Anglo Saxon anvil
Tattershall Thorpe, Anglo Saxon anvil
Tattershall Thorpe, Anglo Saxon anvil

This innocuous-looking piece of iron is actually an important are rare survival.

It is a portable metalworking anvil, excavated as part of a grave assemblage at Tattershall Thorpe in 1981, and at the time the only example of its type known from Britain.

The grave assemblage was that of a travelling smith and contained a treasure trove of tools and scraps intended for recycling.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Tattershall, Thorpe, anvil, smith, iron