Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Settlement - Country Houses
 
Alford, Manor House
Alford, Manor House
Alford, Manor House

Alford Manor House was built in 1611 in a traditional H-plan with thatched roof and timber frame.

Unusually, the walls were encased with brick to form an integral part of the structure, making it a rare example of its kind and it is possibly the largest thatched manor house in England.

This substantial property became the home of Sir Robert Christopher who was knighted in 1660 for his support of the King in the English Civil War.

Today, the house is fully restored and open to the public.

Chris Lester, 2010

See another image of this house


Alford, Manor House, Sir Robert Christopher
Appleby Hall
Appleby Hall
Appleby Hall

This house was built for Sir Rowland Winn in the 1770s, with enlargements in 1822 and 1862 (possibly by William Fowler of Winterton).

In 1885 Rowland Winn MP (grandson of Sir Rowland) was created Baron St Oswald and he occupied the house until his death in 1893.

The Winn family sold the contents of the house in 1928; a fire destroyed much of the house in 1933; and it was finally demolished during World War 2.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Appleby, Hall, Rowland Winn, William Fowler, Baron St Oswald
Ashby de la Launde, Hall
Ashby de la Launde, Hall
Ashby de la Launde, Hall

This hall was built in 1595 for the King family and recased in the 19th century.

It was tenanted as a house in the nineteenth century but also used for a period as a girls’ school.

After wartime occupation by the army and a period of dereliction, it opened as a country club in 1961 (as shown in this photograph.)

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Ashby De La Launde, King family
Aswarby Hall
Aswarby Hall
Aswarby Hall

This important house and estate belonged to a succession of notable families until owned by the Carres in the 16th century and the Whichcotes in the following century.

It is still owned by the Whichcotes, though the house was demolished in 1952.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Aswarby, Carre family, Whichcote family
Aubourn Hall
Aubourn Hall
Aubourn Hall

Originally a Tudor house, Aubourn was altered and added to by Sir John Meres in c1600, the architect, possibly John Smythson, giving the hall its present 5 bay brick south front.

The interior has panelled rooms and a fine staircase.

From 1628 to the present day, the house has been owned by the Nevile family.

Frank Robinson, August 2014

Aubourn, John Meres, John Smythson, Nevile
Barholm, Old Hall Manor House
Barholm, Old Hall Manor House
Barholm, Old Hall Manor House

This house dates from the late 17th century. It is L-shaped with pairs of moulded chimneystacks on the gable ends.

The dovecote, with gables and finials, is contemporary with the house.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Barholm, Old Hall Manor House
Baston, Manor House
Baston, Manor House
Baston, Manor House

A 17th century L-shaped house with brick and stone bands on the north front.

The Dovecote is dated 1802.

H D Martineau c.1980

Baston, Manor House, dovecote
Bayons Manor
Bayons Manor
Bayons Manor

This huge picturesque house in Tealby was built in 1836-42 by Charles Tennyson d’Eyncourt, uncle of the poet Tennyson.

Bayons Manor was blown up by the then owner in 1965.

See other images of this house

The whole of  T R Leach and Robert Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses (Volume 3)', published by SLHA is devoted to this house, with detailed information about the family, the building's history, plans and many photographs.  Buy a copy.

Tealby,
Becklands
Becklands
Becklands

This large Victorian villa in the French style was built for Herve Henri Andre Josse, a Grimsby businessman, in 1870.

Both architect and builder may have been French, but this is uncertain.

M Josse died in 1893 and the house was sold and re-opened as a sanatorium or health resort.

Barnoldby le Beck, Becklands, Herve Henri Andre Josse
Belton House
Belton House
Belton House

Belton House was built for Sir John Brownlow in 1685, with later work by James Wyatt in the 1770s.

See other images of this house

2013

Belton Kesteven, Sir John Brownlow, James Wyatt
Billingborough Hall
Billingborough Hall
Billingborough Hall

Billingborough Hall was built by William Toller between 1611 and 1620 and later enlarged by his son Richard.

It is said that some of the stone used in its construction came from nearby Sempringham Abbey.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Billingborough, Hall, William Toller, Sempringham Abbey
Billingborough, Birthorpe Manor
Billingborough, Birthorpe Manor
Billingborough, Birthorpe Manor

The earliest parts of this U-shaped house date from the mid C17; substantial additions and alterations were made in the mid C18 and late C19.

It is constructed of coursed limestone rubble with limestone ashlar. The roofs have plain tiles with stone coped gables.

H D Martineau c.1980

Billingborough, Birthorpe Manor
Blankney Hall
Blankney Hall
Blankney Hall

This was one of the grandest houses in Lincolnshire but was seriously damaged by fire in 1945 and demolished in 1960.

Blankney Hall was built in the 1790s for the Chaplin family.

Additions and remodelling during the nineteenth century brought new stables and a large service wing as well as a new front and attic storey.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy. .

Blankney, Hall, Chaplin family
Bloxholm Hall
Bloxholm Hall
Bloxholm Hall

Bloxholm Hall was built in the mid-seventeenth century in Artisan Mannerism style.

It was altered after purchase by the Duchess of Rutland and again in the 1820s by Lewis Vulliamy.

The house was demolished in the twentieth century.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Bloxholm, Hall, Artisan Mannerism, Duchess of Rutland, Lewis Vulliamy
Boothby Pagnell, Manor House
Boothby Pagnell, Manor House
Boothby Pagnell, Manor House

This unique Norman manor house is in the private grounds behind Boothby Pagnell Hall.

It dates from about 1200 and is built of limestone rubble with ashlar dressings.

The rectangular building has a vaulted ground floor with hall and solar above.

Boothby Pagnell, Norman
Brocklesby Park
Brocklesby Park
Brocklesby Park

The substantial house of the early seventeenth century was rebuilt in the first quarter of the eighteenth.

It was built for the Pelhams, owners of the largest Lincolnshire estate.

Substantial extensions were built in the nineteenth century, as shown in this photograph.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Brocklesby, Park, Pelham
Cadeby Hall
Cadeby Hall
Cadeby Hall

Cadeby Hall is set in a secluded valley on the east side of the Wolds.

It was built in the early 18th century as a dower house for the Heneages of Hainton. After being empty for many years it has now been restored.

Nearby is the site of the deserted medieval village of North Cadeby.

(Photo taken from a public footpath.)

Frank Robinson, 2010

 

 

Cadeby, Heneage, hall,
Caenby Hall
Caenby Hall
Caenby Hall

This eighteenth century house stood close to Ermine Street (A15).

The hall at Caenby first belonged to the Tornay family.

J T Tweed, Lincoln solicitor and one time Mayor of Lincoln, was a later occupant of the house (until his death in 1910).

Caenby Hall was demolished before the Second World War.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Caenby, Hall, Tornay, J T Tweed
Claythorpe Manor
Claythorpe Manor
Claythorpe Manor

This building, originally a home of the Hussey family, contains Elizabethan brickwork and timber of a similar age.

The house once had a thatched roof but this was tiled soon after the East Lincolnshire Railway was built nearby.

19th and 20th century occupants include J F Rawnsley and the Palethorpe family.

H D Martineau, c.1980

Aby, Claythorpe Manor, Hussey, J F Rawnsley, Palethorpe
Cockerington Hall
Cockerington Hall
Cockerington Hall

This large house of nine bays built in the early Georgian period was demolished in 1926.

The Scrope family acquired most of the land in South Cockerington in the sixteenth century from the Vavasours and it was Gervase Scrope, High Sheriff of Lincolnshire, who built this house.

This became the secondary property of the Scropes of Danby, North Yorkshire, and was neglected for the second half of the nineteenth century.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

South Cockerington, Scrope, Vavasour, Gervase Scrope
Coleby Hall
Coleby Hall
Coleby Hall

Coleby Hall was built for Sir William Lister in 1628 and was enlarged by Thomas Scrope in the following century.

Early 20th century photograph

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Coleby, Hall, Sir William Lister, Thomas Scrope
Culverthorpe, Hall
Culverthorpe, Hall
Culverthorpe, Hall

Culverthorpe Hall: the central block of the present house was built for Sir John Newton (a cousin of Sir Isaac) in the late 17th century.

In the 1730s, the wings were added, and the S front (seen here) remodelled in Palladian style.

The house stands on a rise and overlooks parkland leading down to a lake.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Culverthorpe, Palladian, John Newton
Dalby Hall
Dalby Hall
Dalby Hall

Dalby Hall (about 2 miles NNE of Spilsby) was built in 1856, after a previous house had been destroyed by fire.

The design is classical – unusual for the architect James Fowler. The bow fronts were added in 1898.

(The house is privately owned; the photograph was taken from the nearby public footpath.)

Frank Robinson, December 2014

Dalby, Dalby Hall, James Fowler
Deeping St James, Waterton Hall
Deeping St James, Waterton Hall
Deeping St James, Waterton Hall

This was the home of the Waterton family. The house was demolished in the 1960s.

undated postcard

Deeping St James, Waterton Hall
Denton Manor
Denton Manor
Denton Manor

The Welbys had a succession of fine houses at Denton, culminating in the one designed by Sir Arthur Blomfield in the 1880s (illustrated here).

The house suffered a serious fire in 1906 but survived only to be demolished in 1939.

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Denton, Manor, Welby, Arthur Blomfield
Doddington Hall
Doddington Hall
Doddington Hall

This house was built for a relatively little-known family (the Pigots) and has the unusual distinction of never having been sold.

The builder of Doddington was Thomas Tailor, a local man.

Drawing of 1797

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Doddington, Hall, Pigot, Thomas Tailor
Dunholme Manor
Dunholme Manor
Dunholme Manor

This ancient manor house, demolished in 1898, was part medieval, part Tudor, with eighteenth century alterations.

It began life as a monastic grange (of Barlings Abbey) and was occupied first by the Granthams.

After a succession of owners of some significance it became a farmhouse.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Dunholme, Manor, Barlings Abbey, grange, Grantham family
Easton Hall
Easton Hall
Easton Hall

The hall pictured was built for the Cholmeley family in the nineteenth-century.

It suffered during wartime requisition and was later demolished.

undated postcard

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Easton, Cholmeley
Edlington Hall
Edlington Hall
Edlington Hall

This drawing is one of the series made by Nattes for Sir Joseph Banks in the late eighteenth century.

It was owned by the Hassard Short family who held an estate of 2,700 acres in the area but preferred to live in the south of England.

The house was demolished in the 1840s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Edlington, Hall, Nattes, Hassard Short family
Elsham Hall
Elsham Hall
Elsham Hall

The core of Elsham Hall is an early 18th century house, which was added to later in the century.

This view shows the house as it was before the major alterations of the 1930s, when a new west wing was built and extensive alterations were made to the rest of the building.

The restyled gardens here are open to the public.

Undated postcard

Elsham, Elwes,
Folkingham, Manor House
Folkingham, Manor House
Folkingham, Manor House

This relatively modest house was built in the 1660s and was built for Lord Clinton using stone from Folkingham Castle.

The Heathcote family became owners in the Victorian period.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Folkingham, Manor, Lord Clinton, Heathcote
Fotherby, Manor House
Fotherby, Manor House
Fotherby, Manor House

Fotherby, Manor House
Gainsborough, Old Hall
Gainsborough, Old Hall
Gainsborough, Old Hall

Described by English Heritage as ‘among the biggest and best preserved medieval manor houses in England’, Gainsborough Old Hall was built in the late 15th century for the de Burgh family.

The brick building has three ranges, the grand Great Hall with its timber frame and massive timber roof occupying the central range.

Also impressive is the kitchen with its huge ovens and fireplaces.

See: www.english-heritage.org.uk

Undated postcard

Gainsborough, Old Hall, de Burgh
Gate Burton, Hall
Gate Burton, Hall
Gate Burton, Hall

This house was built by William Hutton in 1768 and was occupied by the Hutton family until 1908 when it was sold to J D Sandars.

Sandars and the son who succeeded him after the First World War made alterations to the north front and also to the interior (in 1934).

H D Martineau c.1980
Gate Burton, Hall, William Hutton, J D Sandars
Gautby Hall
Gautby Hall
Gautby Hall

This great brick-built eighteenth century mansion was the home of the Vyner family.

The architect was Matthew Brettingham (1699-1769).

The house was only infrequently occupied in the Victorian period and following the death of Robert Vyner in 1874 it was demolished.

Drawing of 1803

Gautby, Hall, Robert Vyner family, Matthew Brettingham
Glentworth Hall
Glentworth Hall
Glentworth Hall

Sir Christopher Wray (1524-92), Lord Chief Justice, built this impressive house in 1567-68.

In the 1750s it was partly replaced by Paine for Thomas Lumley, 3rd Earl of Scarbrough, who had inherited the estate.

Much of the house fell into ruin in the nineteenth century.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Glentworth, Hall, Sir Christopher Wray, Thomas Lumley, Earl of Scarbrough
Goltho Hall
Goltho Hall
Goltho Hall

A narrow, 3-storey building – Goltho Hall – was drawn by Nattes for Joseph Banks in 1800, but this was demolished soon after.

This was one of a succession of halls occupied by the Grantham family and later, through marriage, the Mainwarings and Burtons.

The image here is of the present hall built in 1900 for William Fitzwilliam Burton; it probably contains elements of the older building.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Goltho, Hall, Nattes, Grantham, Mainwaring, Burton, William Fitzwilliam Burton
Grainsby Hall
Grainsby Hall
Grainsby Hall

This house came to William Haigh through marriage in the early nineteenth century.

His son, William Henry, enlarged the house and added Italian stucco decoration to the front.

During World War 2 the house was occupied by the army and it was left in need of extensive repair that were too expensive for the Haigh family.

It was demolished in 1973.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Grainsby, Hall, William Haigh,
Great Limber, Mausoleum
Great Limber, Mausoleum
Great Limber, Mausoleum

The mausoleum in Great Limber (TA133088) on the Brocklesby estate was designed by James Wyatt, in the late eighteenth century.

It commemorates Sophia, the wife of the first Baron Yarborough, who died aged 33 in 1786. It is described as majestic and 'undoubtedly Wyatt's masterpiece' by Pevsner.

Inside is a figure of Sophia by Joseph Nollekens.

Frank Robinson, 2009

 

Great Limber, Brocklesby, Yarborough, Wyatt, Nollekens,
Great Ponton, Manor House
Great Ponton, Manor House
Great Ponton, Manor House

Ellys Manor was the home of the Ellys family, who were rich wool merchants.

It was built in the early 1500s and features a prominent gable end reminiscent of contemporary houses in northern Europe.

It has very fine wall paintings upstairs.

See another image of this house
Great Ponton, Ellys
Great Stourton, Old Hall
Great Stourton, Old Hall
Great Stourton, Old Hall
Great Sturton, Old Hall
Great Sturton, Stourton Hall
Great Sturton, Stourton Hall
Great Sturton, Stourton Hall

Home to the Livesey family of Great Sturton, the Italianate style part of the hall was built between 1873 & 1875 and added to an earlier building of 1810.

The house and estate were sold in 1953 and the house was later demolished.

Postcard sent 1905

Great Sturton, Stourton Hall, Livesey
Grimsthorpe Castle
Grimsthorpe Castle
Grimsthorpe Castle

The magnificent north front was designed by Vanbrugh for the 1st Duke of Ancaster and Kesteven and completed in 1730.

This was Vanburgh’s last work – he died in 1726.

Frank Robinson, September 2014

See other images of this house

Grimsthorpe, Castle, Vanbrugh, Duke of Ancaster
Gunby Hall
Gunby Hall
Gunby Hall

This charming country house was built in 1700, the 2 storey extension being added in two phases in the 19th century.

For generations, Gunby Hall was the seat of the Massingberd family.

After narrowly escaping demolition in World War 2 (to extend a runway for an adjoining airfield), Gunby was given to the National Trust, who now care for the Hall and gardens.

See other images of this house

Frank Robinson

Gunby, Massingberd Mundy, National Trust
Hackthorn Hall
Hackthorn Hall
Hackthorn Hall

John Harris (in the Pevsner guide) describes Hackthorn Hall as a square Yorkshire stone of restrained detail. It is of the Georgian period (1792) in neo-classical style.

This view shows the south and west fronts.  Noteworthy are the five bays and the alternating straight hoods and triangular pediments on the ground floor windows, which overlook the lawn and lake to the south.

See other images of this house

Hackthorn, Hall
Hagnaby Priory
Hagnaby Priory
Hagnaby Priory

This house was built by Thomas Coltman in late 18th century and extensively remodelled by his son (also Thomas) in the 1830s, renaming it Hagnaby Priory.

It is in the Tudor Gothic style and was designed by Charles Kirk of Sleaford.

It was enlarged and partly refaced in white brick in 1851. Most of the house was demolished in the 1920s.

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Hagnaby, Priory, Thomas Coltman, Charles Kirk
Hainton Hall
Hainton Hall
Hainton Hall

This view from the south-west shows the west wing of Hainton Hall rebuilt for the Heneages by Peter Atkinson in the first decade of the nineteenth century.

Atkinson also faced the whole of the house in stucco at about this time.

The porch is attributed to William Burn (1875).

See other images of this house

undated postcard

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Hainton, Hall Peter Atkinson, Heneage
Halstead Hall
Halstead Hall
Halstead Hall

Part of this fine brick building from the 16th century survives on the edge of Stixwould parish.

It was probably built for the Welby family of Moulton.

It was purchased as part of the Stixwould estate by the Turnors of Stoke Rochford in 1778 and was occupied by a tenant farmer.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Stixwould, Halstead Hall, Welby family, Turnor
Harlaxton Manor
Harlaxton Manor
Harlaxton Manor

Harlaxton Manor, built for Gregory de Ligne Gregory, was designed by Anthony Salvin in 1831.

It replaced the earlier Manor elsewhere in the village and was designed to hold Gregory's large art collection and, in its prominent location, was intended to outface nearby Belvoir Castle.

This view shows part of the imposing west elevation.

See other images of this house

Mark Acton, 2008

Harlaxton, Manor, Gregory Gregory, Anthony Salvin,
Harrington Hall
Harrington Hall
Harrington Hall

Harrington Hall has Tudor origins, but was extensively rebuilt in the 17th century and more recently restored following the serious fire of 1991.

Tennyson visited here, and recalled Harrington in his poem ‘Maud’.

The house is privately owned and the gardens are no longer opened to the public.

Frank Robinson, 2011

Harrington, hall, Tennyson, Maud
Hartsholme Hall
Hartsholme Hall
Hartsholme Hall

Francis Henry Goddard built Hartsholme Hall on the south-western edge of Lincoln for Joseph Shuttleworth, the industrialist, in 1862.

Lord Liverpool bought the house, estate and additional land in 1908 before moving to nearby, smaller Canwick Hall in 1939.

In 1951 Lincoln City Council bought the property and demolished the house.

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Buildings,
Haugh, Manor House
Haugh, Manor House
Haugh, Manor House

This was a seat of the Bolle family built in the sixteenth century with stepped chimney stack and crenellations along the east front.

At the south end of the east front there is a moulded brick doorway (now blocked) with a two-centred arch and a square surround.

H D Martineau, c.1980

Haugh, Manor House, Bolle
Haverholme Priory
Haverholme Priory
Haverholme Priory

There was a Gilbertine priory founded in 1139 on this site.

In the 1780s a Gothic house was built here to be followed by this house of 1835 in Tudor style.

postcard dated 1918

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Anwick, Haverholme Priory, Gilbertine priory
Holton le Moor, Hall
Holton le Moor, Hall
Holton le Moor, Hall

This house was built for Thomas Dixon in the 1780s by John Warmer, a builder.

The principal elevation of the house, the south front, has five bays and three floors.

In the centre is a porch with fluted Doric columns and open pediment.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Holton le Moor, Thomas Dixon, Doric
Hougham, Manor
Hougham, Manor
Hougham, Manor

Much of this house dates from the early 17th century but there are significant Norman features inside (corbelled half-pillars, a window). The extrior of the house was rebuilt in the Georgian period.

In its early days the house was occupied by the Bussey family and later the Brudenells.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Hugh D Martineau c.1980

Hougham, Bussey, Brudenell
Irnham Hall
Irnham Hall
Irnham Hall

Irnham Hall was built for Sir Richard Thimbleby in the early 16th century and was an active centre for Catholicism for a long period.

Sir Geoffrey Luttrell was the owner of the estate in the previous century.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Irnham, Hall, Sir Richard Thimbleby, Sir Geoffrey Luttrell
Kelstern Hall
Kelstern Hall
Kelstern Hall

This is a seventeenth century house re-faced in brick in the nineteenth century.

It was owned in succession by the Mussenden family, the Cliffords, the Souths and the Hildreds.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Kelstern, Hall, Mussenden, Clifford, South, Hildred
Kenwick Hall
Kenwick Hall
Kenwick Hall

The substantial Georgian house here was enlarged by Temple Moore in 1889.

It had been occupied by the Allenby family and then, at the time of the 1889 work, by Allenby’s in-laws, the Garfits.

The house was damaged by a bomb in World War 2 and was later restored.  It was demolished in 1960 and replaced by the current building.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Kenwick, Hall, Temple Moore, Allenby, Garfit
Kettlethorpe Hall
Kettlethorpe Hall
Kettlethorpe Hall

The medieval house on this site was occupied by Katherine Swynford.

The eighteenth century house shown in this drawing, dated 1793, by Nattes for Sir Joseph Banks was demolished in the mid-1800s.

The present house was built for Weston Cracroft Amcotts of Hackthorn in the 1860s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Kettlethorpe, Hall, Katherine Swynford, Nattes, Weston Cracroft Amcotts
Knaith Hall
Knaith Hall
Knaith Hall

The architectural history of this house is uncertain though it is known to be based on the Cistercian nunnery of Heynings, dissolved in c.1539.

It was owned and occupied by the Willoughby family until the early eighteenth century.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Knaith, Hall, Heynings, Willoughby family
Langton Hall
Langton Hall
Langton Hall

This was the last grand house built by the Langtons in the village of Langton by Spilsby.

It was designed by James Fowler of Louth and erected at a cost of £8000 in the 1860s.

The house, in continual occupation by the Langtons, was extended in the 1870s and demolished in the 1950s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Langton By Spilsby, James Fowler
Lea Hall
Lea Hall
Lea Hall

The Andersons were the owners of Lea from the 14th century through to the twentieth.

The hall was unoccupied after 1923 was used by the army in World War 2 and demolished in the early 1960s.

This relatively modest house had a stair turret added by J L Pearson in 1875.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Lea, Hall, Anderson, J L Pearson
Leadenham Hall
Leadenham Hall
Leadenham Hall

Built in the last decade of the eighteenth century in a position to the west of the village overlooking the Trent valley.

This is the view from the south-west, showing the principal façade facing south.

The east wing (not visible here) terminates in an arcade probably by Vulliamy in 1829.

April 2013

Leadenham, Vulliamy
Leasingham, Manor House
Leasingham, Manor House
Leasingham, Manor House

Leasingham Manor House dates from the seventeenth century.

The grand south front, hidden from the street, has five bays and two storeys with rusticated quoins and a panelled parapet.

The doorcase has Doric pilasters.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Leasingham, Doric
Ludborough, Manor House
Ludborough, Manor House
Ludborough, Manor House

This a long low brick house, daying from the Elizabethan or Jacobean periods.

The porch on the south side has a four-centred arch to the doorway and pediment above.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Ludborough, Manor house
Manby Hall
Manby Hall
Manby Hall

This was one of the houses owned by the Anderson family of north Lincolnshire.  It was built in the 1770s (in Broughton) when Brocklesby was the Andersons’ principal residence.

Major alterations were undertaken in the 1860s but it was always infrequently occupied.

The house was demolished in c.1970.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Broughton, Manby Hall, Brocklesby, Anderson
Metheringham, Manor House
Metheringham, Manor House
Metheringham, Manor House

This house, with its Greek cross plan with stepped gables, was built for the Sir Thomas Skipworth in the seventeenth century.

It was badly damaged by fire in the nineteenth century.

It was twice occupied by agents of Henry Chaplin of nearby Blankney.

Hugh D Martineau c.1980

Metheringham, Manor house, Greek Cross, Skipworth
Morton by Gainsborough, Morton House
Morton by Gainsborough, Morton House
Morton by Gainsborough, Morton House

This is rendered house dating from the late eighteenth century has five bays and two storeys with top balustrade and porch of unfluted Ionic columns

Hugh D Martineau c.1980

Morton by Gainsborough, Manor House
Nettleham Hall Gates
Nettleham Hall Gates
Nettleham Hall Gates

These highly decorated gates (regrettably in a poor state and target of recent graffiti) were bought by John Hood from St. Peter at Arches church, High Street, Lincoln prior to its demolition in 1856.

They date from about 1720 and were designed by Francis or William Smith.
The piers and wall were added about 1890.

The gates became the grand entrance to Hood's residence, Nettleham Hall, which burnt down in 1935.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Nettleham, Nettleham Hall, gates, St Peter at Arches,
Nocton Hall
Nocton Hall
Nocton Hall

Sir William Ellys built a house here in the late seventeenth century; it was E-shaped with large projecting wings and turrets.

Frederick Robinson, first Earl of Ripon, and one time Prime Minister, was the owner of Nocton Hall when it was destroyed by fire in 1834.

Photograph taken in 1978

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Nocton, Hall, William Ellys, Frederick Robinson, Earl of Ripon
Normanby, Normanby Park
Normanby, Normanby Park
Normanby, Normanby Park

The ancient Sheffield family came to Normanby Park in the 17th century.

In 1820 Sir Robert Smirke rebuilt the present Mansion for Sir Berkeley Sheffield and significant additions were made in 1907.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Normanby, Normanby Park,
Northorpe Hall
Northorpe Hall
Northorpe Hall

This large Elizabethan house, occupied at various times by Monsons and Peacocks, fell into ruin and was finally abandoned in the 1940s.

The hall was replaced by a new hall on an adjacent site in 1875.

Postcard from the 1920s

Northorpe, Hall, Monson, Peacock
Panton Hall
Panton Hall
Panton Hall

The Turnor family of Stoke Rockford built this house in the northern part of their Lincolnshire estate in 1775.

On the site of an earlier mansion, it was designed by John Carr of York.

Panton was sold by the Turnors in 1917 and was then occupied by a Franciscan college.

The house was demolished in 1964 but the fine stables of the 1770s remain.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Panton, Hall, Turnor, Stoke Rochford, John Carr, Franciscan college
Ranby, Ranby Hall
Ranby, Ranby Hall
Ranby, Ranby Hall

This mansion was built for the Otter family of Clayworth, Notts.

In 1905 it was occupied by Lt Col Rowley Richard Conway Hill and in 1919 by Lord Charles Cavendish Bentinck.

The Revd John B Haggar resided here in 1933.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

Ranby Hall, Otter, Rowley Richard Conway Hill, Lord Charles Cavendish Bentinck, Rev John B Haggar
Reasby Hall
Reasby Hall
Reasby Hall

Internal Medieval stonework supports the view that Reasby Hall in the parish of Snelland was once a grange for Barlings Abbey, 3.5 miles to the south.

Above the porch of the present nine-bay house are the arms of an Earl of Scarbrough and the date of 1708.

Ken Redmore, 2010

Reasby, hall, Barlings Abbey, grange, Earl of Scarbrough,
Revesby, Revesby Abbey
Revesby, Revesby Abbey
Revesby, Revesby Abbey

The first country house named after the twelfth-century abbey was built in the early eighteenth century.

The present house was built in 1844 by William Burn for J Banks Stanhope.

View from the south.

November 2014



Revesby, Abbey, William Burn, J Banks Stanhope
Riby Grove
Riby Grove
Riby Grove

This Palladian mansion, as with many country houses, was extended in the Victorian period. Its architectural history is little known.

The owners of the house from the 17th century include, in succession, Husseys, Tomlines and Pretymans.

The house was sold by the Pretymans in the 1930s and demolished soon after.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Riby, Grove, Hussey, Tomline, Pretyman
Riseholme Hall
Riseholme Hall
Riseholme Hall

Riseholme Hall was built by the Chaplin family in 1744.

Purchased by the Church Commissioners in 1840, the Hall was restyled by the architect William Rainton and until the late nineteenth century was the Palace of the Bishop of Lincoln.

After World War 2, the Hall and estate became an agricultural college, now a Campus of the University of Lincoln.

In July 2012, the Further Education provision at Riseholme College transferred to Bishop Burton College.

See: www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/riseholmecollege/ourcampus/history

Riseholme, Hall, Bishop's Palace, William Rainton, agricultural college
Scampton Hall, Gateway
Scampton Hall, Gateway
Scampton Hall, Gateway

The Gateway in Scampton House Field was built as the grand entry to Scampton Hall.

It was built for Sir John Bolle around 1603, but, following the demolition of the Hall, it now stands lonely in a field.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Scampton, Scampton Hall, gateway, John Bolle,
Scawby Hall
Scawby Hall
Scawby Hall

This is the seat of the Nelthorpe family who have occupied it continuously since it was built in c.1600.

The main front of the red brick house dates from the eighteenth century and part of the east front was rebuilt in 1913.

Drawing of 1795

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Scawby, Hall, Nelthorpe family
Scremby Hall
Scremby Hall
Scremby Hall

The Brackenbury family lived in this large house from the mid-eighteenth century for a little over 100 years.

After a succession of owners and insufficient investment its contents were sold in 1937 and the house was demolished in the 1970s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Scremby, Hall Brackenbury
Scrivelsby Court
Scrivelsby Court
Scrivelsby Court

Scrivelsby Court, the seat of the Dymoke family, was demolished in 1956.

The house was built, rebuilt and extended on many occasions over the centuries.

Serious fires occurred in 1761 and 1869.

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Scrivelsby,
Shillingthorpe Hall
Shillingthorpe Hall
Shillingthorpe Hall

This fine mansion near Braceborough was built in 1796 for Dr John Willis, physician to King George III.

A number of owners occupied the house in the 19th century and, in common with many Lincolnshire houses, was used by the army during World War 2.

It was demolished around 1960.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Greatford, Shillingthorpe Hall, John Willis
Somerby Hall
Somerby Hall
Somerby Hall

This early nineteenth century house, in yellow brick, was built for the Westons when Rev Charles Fleetwood Weston was head of the family.

The Chatterton family were its occupants in the 20th century but it fell into a bad state of repair and was demolished in 1964.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Somerby, Hall, Charles Fleetwood Weston, Chatterton family
Souh Elkington, Elkington Hall
Souh Elkington, Elkington Hall
Souh Elkington, Elkington Hall

Elkington Hall, in South Elkington, was a relatively plain building, relieved by a substantial tower.

It was built in 1842 for the Smyth family by Edward Buckton Lambe.

It remained in the Smyth family until the estate was sold in the 1930s. The house was demolished in the 1960s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

See another image of this house


South Elkington, Elkington Hall, smyth
South Kelsey, Hall
South Kelsey, Hall
South Kelsey, Hall

A large Tudor house here belonged to the Ayscoughs.

It was surrounded by a moat and its front was flanked by octagonal turrets.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.


South Kelsey, Ayscough
Spilsby, The Avenue
Spilsby, The Avenue
Spilsby, The Avenue

About one mile south-west of the town was Eresby Hall, home of the Willoughby family.

The house was destroyed by fire in 1769. This is the fine avenue leading south from the Spilsby-Hundleby road.

postcard printed and published by W K Morton in Spilsby.

Spilsby, The Avenue, Eresby Hall, Willoughby, W K Morton
Stoke Rochford Hall
Stoke Rochford Hall
Stoke Rochford Hall

Built for Christopher Turnor by William Burn in 1844. The style is described by Pevsner as Jacobethan.

undated postcard

Stoke Rochford, William Burn, Christopher Turnor
Sudbrooke Holme
Sudbrooke Holme
Sudbrooke Holme

The early occupants of this fine house were the Richard Ellisons, father and after him the son.  Richard the elder built the house in c.1790.

Later owners of the house were Pelhams and Sibthorps.

The gardens were extensive and elaborate.

The house was demolished in the 1920s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Sudbrooke, Holme, Ellison, Pelham, Sibthorp
Syston Hall
Syston Hall
Syston Hall

Syston Hall, one of several Lincolnshire properties owned by members of the widespread Thorold family, was built in 1768-69.

The main block was of three stories and seven bays, the centre three bays forming a canted bay.

The house became unoccupied in 1912 and was demolished in 1928.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Syston, Hall, Thorold
Temple Belwood
Temple Belwood
Temple Belwood

Temple Belwood, on the eastern edge of Belton (Isle of Axholme), took its name from its original owners, the Knights Templar.

William Johnson replaced an Elizabethan house with a new building (shown here) in 1787.  The architect was Samuel Foster.

It was developed as a boarding house by new owners in 1900 and later as a school.

The walled kitchen garden is the principal survivor of this substantial house.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Belton Axholme, Temple Belwood, Knights Templar, William Johnson, Samuel Foster
Thonock Hall
Thonock Hall
Thonock Hall

Perhaps originally built in the mid-Georgian period, Thonock Hall near Gainsborough was re-cased and stuccoed in the 1830s.

Home to the Bacons, baronets, it fell into disrepair after the death of Sir Hickman Bacon in 1945 and was demolished in 1964.

Undated posted published by W. F. Belton of Gainsborough

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Thonock, Hall
Thoresby House
Thoresby House
Thoresby House

This illustration, made for Sir Joseph Banks in the 1790s, is of a little known though substantial house in South Thoresby built for the Wood family.

It was demolished in the 1820s.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

South Thoresby, House, Wood
Thorganby Hall
Thorganby Hall
Thorganby Hall

Thorganby Hall, though Georgian in its details, is the remains of a house rebuilt in 1648.

The two-storey five-bay front is seventeenth century in plan with nineteenth century casing.

It was the home of the Willoughby family and later the Nainbys.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Thorganby, Hall, Nainby
Thorpe Hall, Louth
Thorpe Hall, Louth
Thorpe Hall, Louth

The earliest part of the house is 1584.

It was acquired by the Bolle family (originally from Swineshead, and also at Haugh).

The house was rebuilt in the late 17th century and was extensively restored in the 20th.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Louth, Thorpe Hall, Bolle
Torksey Castle
Torksey Castle
Torksey Castle
More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.
Torksey, Castle
Tupholme Hall
Tupholme Hall
Tupholme Hall

This house, the first home of the Vyners in Lincolnshire, was completed sometime before 1726.

The estate was sold by the Vyners shortly after the First World War and, despite strong attempts to save the house, it was demolished in 1984.

Photograph 1980

Tupholme, Hall, Vyner
Uffington Hall
Uffington Hall
Uffington Hall

Uffington was a substantial and impressive house built for Charles Bertie in 1688.

The staircase, walls and ceilings were painted by Verrio.

The house was destroyed by fire in 1904 and never rebuilt.

Gates, stables and a few other outbuildings – all in fine style – remain.

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Uffington,
Walmsgate Hall
Walmsgate Hall
Walmsgate Hall

Walmsgate Hall was built in 1824 for James Whiting Yorke. It passed through the Dallas Yorke family to Lord Francis Cavendish Bentinck before being sold to the Haggas family and demolished in the 1950s.

Undated postcard of the west front by T. A. Humberstone of Walmsgate.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Walmsgate, Walmsgate Hall, James Whiting Yorke, Dallas Yorke, Francis Cavendish, Haggas, T A Humbers
West Ashby, Manor House
West Ashby, Manor House
West Ashby, Manor House

Brick Gothic of the 1840s.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

West Ashby, Manor
West Ashby, West Ashby House
West Ashby, West Ashby House
West Ashby, West Ashby House

An early eighteenth century house, L-shaped with an east front of 5 bays. It has two storeys and pedimented dormers.

The doorway on the East elevation is particularly fine – Roman Doric pilasters and frieze, straight canopy resting on carved brackets.

Hugh D Martineau, c.1980

West Ashby, West Ashby House, Doric
Whaplode, Manor House
Whaplode, Manor House
Whaplode, Manor House

Dating from 1737 this small country house is built in red brick with painted ashlar dressings. It has hipped slate roofs with dogtooth eaves and 3 lateral stacks.

The central doorway on the south elevation has a columnar porch with entablature.

The single hipped dormers have plain sashes which flank a central open pediment supported on a pair of consoles and containing a keyed oculus.

Hugh D Martineau c.1980

Whaplode, Manor House
Willingham House
Willingham House
Willingham House

Willingham House in North Willingham was built in 1790 for Ayscough Boucherett perhaps to the design of Robert Mitchell.

It housed German and Italian prisoners during the Second World War.

Declared unsafe, it was blown up by the Royal Engineers in 1967.

Undated postcard, photograph by C Fieldhouse

See other images of this house

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

North Willingham,
Willoughby Hall
Willoughby Hall
Willoughby Hall

This substantial house in Flemish style was built for the Allix family by William Watkins in 1873 in West Willoughby, one mile west of Ancaster.

Ancaster stone was used from the nearby quarries.

A succession of tenants lived at the hall, but it was largely unoccupied after World War 1.

In ruinous condition, it was demolished in 1964.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Ancaster, Willoughby Hall, West Willoughby, Ancaster stone, Allix, William Watkins
Worlaby Hall
Worlaby Hall
Worlaby Hall

This seventeenth century house was built by Lord Bellasyse in red brick in the Artisan Mannerism style.

The house was pulled down in 1807 and this is the only known illustration.

Drawing of 1796

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Worlaby, Lord Bellasyse, Artisan Mannerism