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Amber Hill
 
Amber Hill, Drainage Scoop Wheel
Amber Hill, Drainage Scoop Wheel
Amber Hill, Drainage Scoop Wheel

For many years the principal form of pump used to drain the Fens was a scoop wheel comprising an array of flat wooden paddles rotating in a narrow slot and capable of lifting a surprisingly large mass of water through a height of a few feet (eg, Dogdyke could raise 25 tons per minute).

Initially these scoop wheels were wind-powered then steam was introduced.

By the time that diesel engine power came into use the more efficient centrifugal pump had been developed and scoop wheels largely disappeared.

This example of a scoop wheel was photographed in 1972 at Amber Hill.

It is standing adjacent to the brick tower of the windmill which powered it.

Chris Lester, 1972

Amber Hill, drainage, scoopwheel, windmill,
Amber Hill, Drainage Scoop Wheel
Amber Hill, Drainage Scoop Wheel
Amber Hill, Drainage Scoop Wheel

View of the wooden scoop wheel, recently restored.

Peter Kirk Collection, 2002

Amber Hill, wind drainage engine, Peter Kirk
Amber Hill, St John The Baptist
Amber Hill, St John The Baptist
Amber Hill, St John The Baptist

"Parish church. 1867 by Edward Browning, in neo Norman style"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1360489 

"It was made redundant on the 9th November 1995 and then later adapted for private dwelling use"

http://parishes.lincolnshire.gov.uk/AmberHill/section.asp?catId=22217 

Peter Kirk Collection, 22 June 2002

Amber Hill, Saint John The Baptist, Church, Edward Browning
Amber Hill, Wind Drainage Engine
Amber Hill, Wind Drainage Engine
Amber Hill, Wind Drainage Engine

Hundreds of wind-powered drainage pumps once lined the rivers and drains in the Fens, of which this is the principal survivor.

This engine was probably built in the late eighteenth century and was taken out of use when steam powered pumping stations were introduced in the 1840s. It was originally about twice the current height and would have worked with four sails.

The wooden scoop wheel has been restored in recent years.

Location of mill: TF 229 460

Peter Kirk Collection, 2002
Amber Hill, wind drainage engine scoop wheel