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Ancaster
 
Ancaster, Roman hare brooch
Ancaster, Roman hare brooch
Ancaster, Roman hare brooch

This enamelled copper alloy brooch, in the form of running hare, dates to the 2nd Century AD.

Hares were sacred animals in Iron Age Britain, and it is likely that these beliefs continued into the Roman period.

Brooches such as this may therefore had greater significance to their wearers than simple representations of common animals.

The brooch was found at Ancaster, the site of an important Roman town.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Ancaster, Romam hare brooch
Ancaster, Roman Trenico inscription
Ancaster, Roman Trenico inscription
Ancaster, Roman Trenico inscription

This carved stone was originally part of an archway, leading into a Romano-Celtic shrine near Ancaster.

The inscription reads:

DEO VIRIDIO
TRENICO ARCVM
FECIT DE [SV]O DONA[VIT]

This translates as 'To the God Viridius, Trenico set up this arch at his own expense'.

Viridius is a deity known only at Ancaster, and represents an Iron Age deity whose worship continued into the Roman period.

His name, which includes the element 'vir' (man, in Latin) suggests that he may represent a god with connections to masculinity and virility.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Ancaster, Roman inscription, Trenico Viridius, Romano-Celtic shrine
Ancaster, St Martin
Ancaster, St Martin
Ancaster, St Martin

Externally, much of St Martinís is Perpendicular, dating from the 14th and 15th centuries. There is 12th century work in the chancel, however, notably the corbel table.

May 2015

 

Ancaster, St Martin church
Ancaster, St Martin
Ancaster, St Martin
Ancaster, St Martin

The clerestory, topped by battlements and pinnacles, dates from the 15th century.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church
Ancaster, St Martin
Ancaster, St Martin
Ancaster, St Martin

The Porch is 13th century, though its roof was rebuilt in 1713.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, porch
Ancaster, St Martin, capital
Ancaster, St Martin, capital
Ancaster, St Martin, capital

This capital on the pier at the east end of the north aisle shows detailed decoration of the Norman period (c.1160-70).

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, capital
Ancaster, St Martin, fees board
Ancaster, St Martin, fees board
Ancaster, St Martin, fees board

This board in the porch of St Martin's church is undated. (Fees are likely to have remained unchanged for a long period of time in the 19th and early 20th centuries.)

April 2016


Ancaster, St Martin church, fees board
Ancaster, St Martin, font
Ancaster, St Martin, font
Ancaster, St Martin, font

The 12th century tub font has intersecting blank arcading on its sides.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, font
Ancaster, St Martin, grave cover
Ancaster, St Martin, grave cover
Ancaster, St Martin, grave cover

Within the porch stand two 14th century grave covers depicting priests. This one has his hands clasped in prayer.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, grave cover
Ancaster, St Martin, grave cover
Ancaster, St Martin, grave cover
Ancaster, St Martin, grave cover

This 14th century grave cover stands in the porch and depicts a priest with a chalice.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, grave cover
Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone
Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone
Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone

A finely decorated gravestone by the north-east corner of the church.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, gravestone
Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone
Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone
Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone

This is a fine, deeply carved headstone in local limestone. Unfortunately the inscription has long since disappeared.

April 2016

Ancaster, St Martin, gravestone
Ancaster, St Martin, interior
Ancaster, St Martin, interior
Ancaster, St Martin, interior

The 12th century north arcade has sturdy piers and round arcades with Norman billet and zigzag decoration.

May 2015

Ancaster, St Martin church, interior
Ancaster, St Martin, memorial
Ancaster, St Martin, memorial
Ancaster, St Martin, memorial

Monument to Captain William Kent Allix, who fell at the Battle of Inkerman during the Crimean War.

Mark Acton, 2016

Ancaster, St Martin, Memorial, William Kent Allix, Crimean War
Ancaster, St Martin, monument
Ancaster, St Martin, monument
Ancaster, St Martin, monument

This tablet with fine trumpeting angel is on the wall of the north aisle and commemorates Elizabeth Long who died in 1743. She was wife of Edward Long.

April 2016

Ancaster, St Martin church, monument, Elizabeth Long, angel, Edward Long
Ancaster, St Martin, monument
Ancaster, St Martin, monument
Ancaster, St Martin, monument

A monument by Thomas King of Bath for John Roe who died in 1796.

April 2016

Ancaster, St Martin church, monument, Thomas King of Bath, John Roe
Ancaster, St Martin, monument
Ancaster, St Martin, monument
Ancaster, St Martin, monument

The single pedestal supporting the monument to John Roe bears the name of the sculptor, T(homas) King, Ft (fecit) Bath, founder of a long lasting company of west country monumental masons. His dates: 1741-1804.

April 2016

Ancaster, St Martin church, monument, Thomas King
Willoughby Hall
Willoughby Hall
Willoughby Hall

This substantial house in Flemish style was built for the Allix family by William Watkins in 1873 in West Willoughby, one mile west of Ancaster.

Ancaster stone was used from the nearby quarries.

A succession of tenants lived at the hall, but it was largely unoccupied after World War 1.

In ruinous condition, it was demolished in 1964.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach and R Pacey's book, 'Lost Lincolnshire Country Houses: Volume 2', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Ancaster, Willoughby Hall, West Willoughby, Ancaster stone, Allix, William Watkins