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Belton (Kesteven)
 
Belton House
Belton House
Belton House

Built from 1685 onwards for Sir John Brownlow, the house was owned by the Brownlow and Cust families for 300 years until its acquisition by the National Trust.  Seen here are the south and west fronts.

April 2013

Belton Kesteven, Belton House
Belton House
Belton House
Belton House

Built from 1685 onwards for Sir John Brownlow, the house was owned by the Brownlow and Cust families for 300 years until its acquisition by the National Trust.  Seen here is the elegant south front.

Frank Robinson, March 2014

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, John Brownlow, Cust, National Trust
Belton House
Belton House
Belton House

View of the north front, with fine formal garden either side of the broad gravel path leading to the entrance.

undated postcard

Belton Kesteven, Belton House
Belton House
Belton House
Belton House

The house was built for 'young' Sir John Brownlow in 1685-88 by mason and builder William Stanton.

It was home to successive generations of the Brownlow and Cust families until the House and the Park were acquired by the National Trust in 1984. It receives some 400,000 visitors each year.

The Cust and Brownlow papers are now in Lincolnshire Archives.

postcard by Whipple of Grantham, 1903

Belton Kesteven, Whipple, Sir John Brownlow
Belton House, Army Camp
Belton House, Army Camp
Belton House, Army Camp

Over 170,000 men of the Machine Gun Corps trained in the grounds of Belton House during the First World War, an area which had been used by local volunteer forces since the 1880s.

Accommodation for the troops was initially in bell tents but they were replaced in 1915 by prefabricated wooden huts (shown here).

Supplies to the camp were carried on a standard gauge branch line from the main line at Peascliffe north of Grantham.

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, army machine gun corps, railway
Belton House, Army Camp
Belton House, Army Camp
Belton House, Army Camp

Over 170,000 men of the Machine Gun Corps trained in the grounds of Belton House during the First World War, an area which had been used by local volunteer forces since the 1880s.

Accommodation for the troops was initially in bell tents but they were replaced in 1915 by prefabricated wooden huts (shown here).

Supplies to the camp were carried on a standard gauge branch line from the main line at Peascliffe north of Grantham.

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, Machine Gun Corps, World War I, railway
Belton House, Barn
Belton House, Barn
Belton House, Barn

The National Trust notice explains that this is a listed structure made using corrugated iron possibly salvaged from the remains of the former Machine Gun Corps camp.

DB 1 October 2016. 

Belton Kesteven, Barn, Machine Gun Corps
Belton House, Boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse

John Cust, the first Earl Brownlow, commissioned Anthony Salvin to design the boathouse in grounds of Belton House in the 1840s.

It has unusual basket-weave plasterwork and a stone fish scale roof, and was restored by the National Trust in 2008.

This photograph from the Edwardian period shows a family party at the boathouse.

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse

John Cust, the first Earl Brownlow, commissioned Anthony Salvin to design the boathouse in grounds of Belton House in the 1840s.

It has unusual basket-weave plasterwork and a stone fish scale roof, and was restored by the National Trust in 2008.

DB 8th July 2016.

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse
Belton House, Boathouse

Stickwork boathouse located in the wilderness garden. The National Trust is currently seeking funds for its restoration.

DB 23 September 2017 

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, boathouse
Belton House, Gardens
Belton House, Gardens
Belton House, Gardens

This fine postcard depicts the garden with the fountain in full flow.

The fountain is believed to have been pumped by a pump made by John Braithwaite in 1817 and now in store at the Science Museum.

The pump was powered by a waterwheel which still survives in situ.

Braithwaite's detailed invoice for the work survives in the Brownlow deposit at Lincolnshire Archives and it is a remarkable list of parts together with details of the labour for installation.

This sunken formal garden and fountain are recognisable today, though the garden design is much simplified and water no longer issues from the fountain.

1930s photograph

 

 

Belton Kesteven, gardens, waterwheel, pump,
Belton House, Kitchen
Belton House, Kitchen
Belton House, Kitchen

The kitchen and adjoining service accommodation in the basement at Belton House are now regularly accessible to visitors.

The early 20th century fittings in kitchen, pantries, stores etc were in original (and dirty) condition at the time of this photograph.

A waist-high tramway at the side of the long corridor enabled food to be moved quickly from the kitchen to dining room. 

Ken Redmore, 2008

 

Belton Kesteven, kitchen, tramway,
Belton House, Orangery
Belton House, Orangery
Belton House, Orangery

The Orangery stands near the site of the original manor house. Designed by Jeffry Wyatville in the early 19th century.

DB 8th November 2017

 

Belton Kesteven,Belton House, orangery
Belton House, Park
Belton House, Park
Belton House, Park

In the mid-eighteenth century the park and gardens at Belton were extensively redesigned by Sir John Brownlow III (later Viscount Tyrconnel).  This included follies and other architecural features.

This decorative gate post is alongside the main drive and near the SW corner of the house.

December 2010

Belton Kesteven, gate post, Viscount Tyrconnel
Belton House, Park, Bellmount Tower
Belton House, Park, Bellmount Tower
Belton House, Park, Bellmount Tower

Viewing tower built by Viscount Tyrconnel c1751. Visual termination to the eastern avenue leading from Belton House.

DB 4 December 2017.

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, Bellmount Tower
Belton House, Pumphouse
Belton House, Pumphouse
Belton House, Pumphouse

The small building astride a branch of the Witham to the west of Belton House contains a waterwheel fitted in the early 19th century to drive a water pump.

Water from the river was pumped to tanks in the roof of the house where it could be used in the event of fire.

A second pipe led to the fine fountain in the formal gardens to the north of the house.

2011

Belton Kesteven, pumphouse, Witham
Belton House, Pumphouse Waterwheel
Belton House, Pumphouse Waterwheel
Belton House, Pumphouse Waterwheel

This waterwheel, 12 feet in diameter, is made of cast iron. It stands over a branch of the river Witham and is controlled by the sluice on the extreme right of the picture.

The wheel drove a 4-cylinder pump, built by John Braithwaite in the 1817 and dismantled in 1933. Water was pumped up to the house and to the fountain in the formal gardens.

2011 

Belton Kesteven, waterwheel, Belton House, John Braithwaite
Belton House, Stables
Belton House, Stables
Belton House, Stables

Former stables and now a restaurant. Contemporary with the house c1688 and probably the work of master mason William Stanton.

DB 4 December 2017 

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, Stables
Belton House, Stables Graffiti
Belton House, Stables Graffiti
Belton House, Stables Graffiti

Graffiti including a post mill and apotropaic marks on the outside of Belton House Stables. The stables are contemporary with the house c1688 and probably the work of master mason William Stanton.

DB 4 December 2017

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, Stables, Graffiti, Apotropaic
Belton, St Peter & St Paul
Belton, St Peter & St Paul
Belton, St Peter & St Paul

The small church of St Peter and St Paul is close to Belton House and contains several monuments to the Brownlow family, owners of the house.

The tower dates from the 12th century; the chancel is early Georgian.

Wyatville designed the mortuary chapel of 1816.

Undated photograph

Belton Kesteven, St Peter & St Paul, Brownlow, Wyatville
Belton, St Peter & St Paul
Belton, St Peter & St Paul
Belton, St Peter & St Paul

This tiny church is approached from the gardens of Belton House.  The tower dates from the 13th and 17th centuries, while the nave has a north arcade that is said to be Norman - though much restoration has taken place.

It is full of Brownlow and Cust monuments.

Frank Robinson, March 2014

Belton Kesteven, church St Peter & St Paul, Brownlow, Cust
Belton, St Peter & St Paul, memorial
Belton, St Peter & St Paul, memorial
Belton, St Peter & St Paul, memorial

In the centre of the photo are the monuments to the first Earl Brownlow (d1853), and his wife Sophia (d1814).

The church is full of imposing family monuments – hence the quip
‘Belton church was built to the glory of the Brownlows, and in memory of God’.

Frank Robinson, March 2014

Belton Kesteven, St Peter & St Paul