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Eastville
 
Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The chapel on Boston Road (or Spilsby Road, New Leake?) was built in 1876. The last service in the building was held in 1964 and it was sold two years later.

The chapel was adapted for use as a garage/store for the adjacent house, ‘The Cottage’.

It is located at NGR TF 402 568 (Eastville)

Barry Barton, 1977

Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station

This station, on the East Lincolnshire Railway line across the East Fen was opened in 1848.

Although the railway is still in use (Boston to Skegness line), Eastville Station was closed to passengers in 1961 and to goods traffic in 1964.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, railway station
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station

East Ville station, between Firsby and Boston, opened in 1848.

Originally named East Ville & New Leake, it changed its name to East Ville in 1952. This is one of those occasional stations that the railway companies insisted on a slightly different name from that of the village it served.  The two words can be seen on the signal box in this 1971 view. The village was always Eastville locally.

On 11 September 1961 it was one of 25 rural stations in the County that lost its passenger trains, but goods trains continued to call until 1964.

Trains between Boston and Skegness still pass the site but the signal box and traditional crossing gates have gone.

Peter Grey Archive, 1971

Eastville, railway station, New Leake
Eastville, St Jude
Eastville, St Jude
Eastville, St Jude

St Jude’s Mission Room, with war memorial and Women’s Institute, Eastville.

St Jude's was built in red brick in the 1860s.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, St Jude mission room, Women's Institute
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul

St Paul’s Church, Eastville. Two miles to the north of the station. Yellow mixed with red brick. Architect John C. Carter.  Consecrated in 1840.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, St Paul, John C Carter
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul

St Paul's was the only one of six churches built in this area of the Fenland not to be designed by Pacey.

It is constructed of yellow and red brick.

Barry Barton, c.1980

Eastville, St Paul church
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul

The church was declared redundant and developed serious structural problems by 2010. Permission to demollish was opposed in a High Court hearing.

Barry Barton, c.1980

 

Eastville,
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul
Eastville, St Paul

"It was the last of six churches built under the Fen Churches Act 1816 and was completed in 1840.

The Church ceased to be used for worship in around 2007 because there were signs of movement in the structure and the congregation could no longer support the financial burden of maintaining the building. 

https://www.bostonstandard.co.uk/news/church-is-saved-from-demolition-1-5615746

Sadly the church has now been demolished.

Peter Kirk Collection, 24 July 1993

Eastville, Saint Paul, Church, Fen Churches Act
Eastville, Wheatsheaf public house
Eastville, Wheatsheaf public house
Eastville, Wheatsheaf public house

Looking north at the junction of the Fodder Dyke and the Spilsby Road (about a quarter of a mile west of the railway station).

The Wheatsheaf pub is to the left of the photograph.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, New Leake, Wheatsheaf public house