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Friskney
 
Friskney, All Saints
Friskney, All Saints
Friskney, All Saints

A fine church from the Perpendicular period with fragments of earlier dates.

Graham Dunn, 2013

Friskney, All Saints church, perpendicular
Friskney, All Saints
Friskney, All Saints
Friskney, All Saints

The top stages of the tower of All Saints are built in the Perpendicular style.

Graham Dunn, 2013

Friskney, All Saints church tower
Friskney, All Saints
Friskney, All Saints
Friskney, All Saints

Originally built in the late 12th century with additions made up to the 15th.

Restored by W Butterfield in 1879.

Postcard: c1930

Friskney, All Saints church, W Butterfield
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages

These two cottages are at the western end of the church yard. The main southern gate into the church yard is on the right.

The cottage nearest to the viewer is still extant (Vicarage Cottage) and has the date 1797 carved above the door.

The barely-visible thatched cottage behind it has been demolished (see separate image).

Postcard: date stamp 1925

Friskney, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, duck decoy
Friskney, duck decoy
Friskney, duck decoy

This overgrown pond lies within the Decoy Wood nature reserve, and was once a duck decoy. It is said that in 1866 over a thousand ducks were caught here.

The photo shows what is left of one of the ‘pipes’, down which the birds were enticed and trapped.

See:- www.lincstrust.org.uk/reserves/Friskney-Decoy-Wood

Frank Robinson, January 2014

Friskney, duck decoy
Friskney, Eaudyke Post Office
Friskney, Eaudyke Post Office
Friskney, Eaudyke Post Office

The Eaudyke Post Office was active as a post office and village store from the late nineteenth century until the 1980s.

It is now a private house.

Postcard: c.1930

Friskney, Eaudyke post office
Friskney, Fold Hill
Friskney, Fold Hill
Friskney, Fold Hill

Looking north east towards the junction between Church  Road, Field Lane and Wright’s Lane (Panton’s Corner).

The sails of Kitching’s Mill are just visible behind the buildings in the centre of the photograph.

Postcard: date stamp 1905 (Edward VII)

Friskney, Fold Hill, Kitching's Mill, Panton's Corner
Friskney, kissing gate
Friskney, kissing gate
Friskney, kissing gate

This kissing gate stood at the east end of junction of Chapel Lane and Field Lane (the eastern end of this path is called Wash Dyke Lane).

The public right of way still exists but the gate is long gone.

Postcard: c1930

Friskney, kissing gate, wash dyke lane
Friskney, Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Methodist Chapel

The main Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel Lane (off the Friskney Eaudyke). A plaque above the doorway is inscribed "Wesleyan Centenary Chapel 1839".

A single storey Sunday School Building was added to the right of the Chapel (as viewed in the photograph) in 1951. It ceased to be used as a chapel in 2006.

Postcard c1940?

Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, School
Friskney, School
Friskney, School

The building on the left is Friskney School (then one of three in the village – others being on the Friskney Eaudyke and the other in the former East Fen).

It catered for pupils between the ages of 5 and 15 until the late 1950s and then became a primary school.

The stile at the eastern end of the churchyard is on the right of the photograph.

Postcard: date stamp 1941 (George VI)

Friskney, School
Friskney, The Anchor
Friskney, The Anchor
Friskney, The Anchor

The Anchor (dated 1850 above the door in the entrance porch) is the building on the left (close to the eastern wall of the churchyard).

At that time it was one of five pubs in the village: The Good Intent was just along the road (opposite the School), The Three Tuns at the foot of Wright’s Lane, The Bricklayer’s Arms (The Middle House) on the Friskney Eaudyke, The Barley Mow at the junction of Sea Lane and the main Boston-Skegness road, and the New Inn at the village boundary on the Fodder Dyke Bank.

The Anchor and the Barley Mow are the only two survivors.

Friskney, The Anchor. Barley Mow, Bricklayer's Arms
Friskney, The Avenue
Friskney, The Avenue
Friskney, The Avenue

This is a magnifient avenue of elms about a quarter of a mile north of the church.

It was felled around 1960 (as were the elms in the churchyard) and now survives in name only.

Postcard: c1930

Friskney, The Avenue, elms
Friskney, The Vicarage
Friskney, The Vicarage
Friskney, The Vicarage

The Vicarage was built in the 18th century and was still in use into the last half of the 20th.

It is now a private dwelling.

Postcard: early 1900s (Edward VII stamp)

Friskney, vicarage
Friskney, Tofts post mill
Friskney, Tofts post mill
Friskney, Tofts post mill

Built c1730 with four common sails. It was on the landward side of the Main Road to the north of the Barley Mow in an area which until the end of the 19th century was called ‘The Floors’ – indicating a site of medieval salt pans.

At the time of this photograph, Friskney also had two tower mills – Kitching’s Mill at Fold Hill and Hoyle’s Mill at the Low Road boundary with Wainfleet St Mary (the dumpy tower of Hoyle’s mill is the only present-day survivor).

There is a mound about half a mile to the west of the church called ‘Mill Hill’. Was this the site of a much earlier post mill? Edward Kealey, in his book Harvesting the Air, Windmill Pioneers of Twelfth-Century England cites a charter, dated no later than 1189, recording the gift of a Friskney windmill and saltpans by Gilbert of Benniworth to the nuns of North Ormsby.

Postcard: c1920 (photograph by Rex Wailes, author of The English Windmill)

Friskney, Tofts post mill, Kitching's Mill, Hoyle's Mill
Friskney, Tofts post mill
Friskney, Tofts post mill
Friskney, Tofts post mill

This mill was built in c.1730 and stood at the junction of Sea Lane and the A52 (TF 481554).

The last miller, John Stephenson, who had started his career here as an apprentice in 1874, retired in 1934. Both the mill and Mr Stephenson feature in In Search of English Windmills (1931) by Thurston Hopkins and Stanley Freese.

The mill was severely damaged by storms and for a while survived with two sails.  It had to be dismantled in 1939.

Postcard: c1930

Friskney, Tofts post mill, John Stephenson
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage

The hand-written commentary on the reverse of this old postcard identifies the two figures as Mrs B Johnson and Mr R Robinson (the school master).

Postcard: c1904 (according to hand-written description on the reverse)

Friskney, Vicarage Cottages