Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Heighington
 
Heighington, Beckfield House
Heighington, Beckfield House
Heighington, Beckfield House

Beckfield House faces onto Station Road. Facing the house to the south is the Recreation Ground, bought by Beckfield’s owner Mr Robert Wright to prevent buildings spoiling his outlook. He let the field to the village for a peppercorn rent of 1/- a year.

Mr Wright bought the house in 1918, he died there in 1933 and his widow died in 1956. The house was sold in 1957 and is now an old people's home.

This photograph was probable taken in the 1930s.

Heighington, Beckfield House, Station Road, Recreation Ground, Robert Wright
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease

This is Heighington's Chapel of Ease before 1863 when it still served as the Boys’ School for local villages.

The Rector feared that it might be mistaken for a Methodist Chapel, at a time when these brick chapels were appearing widely in Lincolnshire, so he had it faced in stone.

He also fitted the building with pews and enhanced it with an east window of stained glass.

Two school rooms for the boys were built on the north side with a connecting door into the Chapel so that the right to the Charity Fund for the boys to be taught in the Chapel of Ease was retained.

The building existed in 1500 and probably long before and was originally thatched. It is still used as Heighington’s Church.

Heighington, Chapel of Ease, boys' school
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease
Heighington, Chapel of Ease

The Chapel of Ease at Heighington, with the chimney from the boiler room sticking up at the back.

Initially the Chapel and each school room had open fires, but later central heating radiators were served from a boiler room.

The playground, now the carpark, is north of the right hand side stone wall.

Heighington, Chapel of Ease, schoolroom
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm

An early view of the back of the farmhouse at Clarke’s Charity Farm.

This property was left by Sir Edward Clarke to provide funds for a 'Bread Charity'.

The house faces south onto High Street with the Beck running across the north end of the yard - hence the ducks!

Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm, Bread Charity
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm

A view of the farmyard with the hay harvest coming home.

At this time there was a low hedge on the north side of the house enclosing a small garden.

In the early twentieth century the farm was in the tenancy of Mr Drakes.

Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm, Drakes, Hay Harvest
Heighington, Council Houses
Heighington, Council Houses
Heighington, Council Houses

Council houses built 1950-51 on the north side of Almond Avenue, parallel to Fen Road.

The open space in the right foreground is part of that left for the children’s play area.

The field had been under barley the previous year; the crop was cut by a horse-drawn binder and the stooks carried to Abraham Bell’s Manor Farm by horse and cart.

One of the horses was called ‘Duke’.

Heighington, Council Houses, Abraham Bell
Heighington, Curtis's Lorries
Heighington, Curtis's Lorries
Heighington, Curtis's Lorries

This photograph was taken on 7 August 1954 and shows the post-Second World War fleet of Curtis’s lorries in Mill Field. The furthest eight appear to be ex-army vehicles.

This is now the site of the Primary School with, in the background, houses on the south side of Washingborough Road.

Heighington, Curtis, Lorry, Mill Field
Heighington, Fen Road Chapel members
Heighington, Fen Road Chapel members
Heighington, Fen Road Chapel members
Heighington Fen Road Methodist Chapel members in George Capps’s lorry on Good Friday in the mid-1950s.
Heighington, Fen Road Chapel group, George Capps
Heighington, Garratt's Boys School
Heighington, Garratt's Boys School
Heighington, Garratt's Boys School

Pupils of Garratt's Boys School in the 1920s.

The Master is Mr Simmons.

The chalkboard appears to carry the lettering "Heighington Endowed School 1922".

Heighington, Garratt's Boys School, Simmons
Heighington, Heighington House
Heighington, Heighington House
Heighington, Heighington House

Heighington House in the early twentieth century was run as a Girls' Finishing School where daughters of wealthy farmers 'learnt enough French for a menu, deportment and conversazioné', according to one ex-pupil.

It was originally a farmhouse and bears on a front quoin a sundial with the words 'William Arden fecit'. Arden was a farmer from Bassingham who retired here and built the stone front on the old brick house.

Heighington, finishing school, heighington house, William Arden
Heighington, High Street
Heighington, High Street
Heighington, High Street

The High Street looking west towards the Post Office corner. The telegraph pole on the RHS stands in front of the railings of the Village Hall and pub carpark.

Just past the Butcher and Beast is Hufton’s Blacksmith shop, by this time it sold Shell petrol from a tank under the floor, through a long arm over the pavement.

The stone houses past this, with railings in front, were taken down in the 1950s. During the War soldiers had been billeted in their long attic range, where perhaps the boarders at the Boys’ School had slept.

The house at the end of the view was the School Master’s House (owned by Garrett's Charity), the house to its left was the house and surgery of three consecutive families of doctors from about 1927 to the early 1990s.

Heighington, High Street, Hufton blacksmith
Heighington, Mill
Heighington, Mill
Heighington, Mill
Caption to follow
Heighington, water mill
Heighington, Motor Lorries
Heighington, Motor Lorries
Heighington, Motor Lorries

Some of the earliest motor lorries belonging to the watermill in Heighington.

The man second to the left is Bert Scott.

Heighington, lorry, watermill, Bert Scott
Heighington, Park View House
Heighington, Park View House
Heighington, Park View House

Park View House, Number One High Street.

The right hand end of the side by the road is three storeys high with the rafters of a much steeper roof still remaining under the present flatter Georgian roof.

The Dovecot on the far left is over the Bull Pen.

Did the sound of the doves give a calming background for the bull and mask sudden noises which might alarm him?

The farm buildings (Town End Farm) are now separate private dwellings. They were built to a Victorian 'High Farming' pattern; it was the largest farm in the parish.

Heighington, Park View House, Dovecot, bull pen, Town End Farm
Heighington, Post Office
Heighington, Post Office
Heighington, Post Office

Red brick, green tiled front of Heighington Post Office, the double-fronted building on the left.

Its stone front had been demolished in the early 1920s when "The cart got away with the ’oss” coming down the hill opposite.

The Robinson family moved from their Monks Road shop and re-built the front and ran it as the Post Office and general store for two generations.

The adjoining cottage now has the left hand side door blocked up.

Heighington, Post Office, Robinson
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station

Branston and Heighington Station looking south. The bridge carries the new road to Branston over the line, the old Chapel Lane being diverted by a sharp right-angle bend to the left at the railway sidings and station.

Chapel Lane was re-named Station Road and the Bridge is Station Hill.

There was a staircase, for the convenience of Branston passengers, up onto the Bridge from this platform.

Heighington,
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station

Station buildings viewed from the west, across the line.

This Station is typical of all those along this line which was built to be especially strong to carry the heavy coal trains from the Midlands and the North to London so the passenger traffic on the main line was not delayed.

Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station Staff
Heighington, Railway Station Staff
Heighington, Railway Station Staff

Station staff just before the station closed.

Left George Creasey, porter; centre Mr Rogers, the last station master; right Len Rasen, junior porter.

Mr Rogers moved from the Station House to the right- hand side stone cottage opposite the Flagpole.

Len Rasen continued to work for British Rail and later moved to Chesterfield.

Heighington, Railway Station, staff
Heighington, Railway Station Closure Notice
Heighington, Railway Station Closure Notice
Heighington, Railway Station Closure Notice

Notice of station closure following the Beeching Report.

The passenger service (fare, 3d to Lincoln, six minutes) had been closed earlier but the line had remained open and busy.

The Station site is now under new private housing, despite local efforts to re-open it for passengers.

Heighington, Railway Station, Beeching, closure
Heighington, Sheep
Heighington, Sheep
Heighington, Sheep

Mr Edward Barker’s pedigree Lincolnshire Longwool sheep of Town End Farm.

The sheep are looking north in the field known as Moor Heads.

The houses face onto Park Lane. The field is part of The Parks which was enclosed as park land in the twelfth century.

Heighington, Longwool Sheep, Park Lane
Heighington, Station Road
Heighington, Station Road
Heighington, Station Road

Station Road looking east towards the village from the right-angle bend onto Station Hill.

The Grange on the left hand side, then Beckfield (the Beck runs behind it, parallel to the road), and the view is closed by the old Methodist Chapel School Room.

Heighington, Station Road, Beckfield House, Grange, Methodist Chapel
Heighington, The Beck
Heighington, The Beck
Heighington, The Beck

Heighington Beck, west from the High Street to the three-storey watermill.

Mr Frank East lived in the semi-detached brick house on the left, built by his (stone mason) father on the site of his old thatched stone house in spring 1893.

The October Village Feast had been held on the old site as building work could not start in the winter because of the effect of frost on the mortar.

Heighington, Beck, Watermill
Heighington, Village Hall
Heighington, Village Hall
Heighington, Village Hall

Heighington Village Hall was built of corrugated iron in 1898 after fundraising by the Ladies Sewing Circle.

There are orchard trees at the back. The front car park is shared by the 'Butcher & Beast' Pub next door.

This photograph shows it in 1995 after being re-painted by two prisoners from Morton Hall Open Prison, Swinderby, their transport to the site being provided by Village Hall Committee members.

Heighington, village hall, Morton Hall Open Prison
Heighington, Watermill
Heighington, Watermill
Heighington, Watermill

Back view of Heighington Mill over its pond.

The water runs under the building. It is now a private residence and the millstream can be viewed inside through a glass panel in the floor.

Heighington, watermill