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Lincoln Bridges
 
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street Bridge
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street Bridge
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street Bridge

For 102 years, 1882 to 1984, the lower end of Lincoln High Street was crossed by this bridge.

It carried the Lincoln Avoiding Line at a high level around the south of the City, providing a route for trains not needing to disrupt traffic by passing over the level crossings in the City centre.

his bridge will be well remembered for the inspired advertising slogan it carried in its later years, shown in this view.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984


IA and Bridges,
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Witham Bridge
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Witham Bridge
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Witham Bridge

This bridge, carrying the Lincoln Avoiding Line over the River Witham in the foreground and the drain beyond, behind the garages, was the City’s longest railway bridge. It was 96 metres, (315 feet), long.

The Firth Road premises of what is now Siemens can be seen through and beyond the bridge.

The Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around the City, part of the route of the Great Eastern and Great Northern Joint Railway carrying trains between East Anglia, to south Yorkshire and beyond.

This part of that route was closed in 1983 and dismantled the following year, at which time this bridge was demolished.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984


IA and Bridges,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

This modern painting of High Bridge, viewed from the west, clearly shows the twentieth century restoration work.

Lincoln High Bridge,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

The High Bridge at Lincoln, is seen in this 1950s photograph from a viewpoint in Waterside to the east.

At this time much of the north-south traffic passed along the High Street, over the High Bridge and under the Stonebow.

The obelisk which once stood on the east side of the bridge had been demolished before this date.

Postcard, c1955

Lincoln High Bridge,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

The High Bridge at Lincoln, viewed here from the west, is the only bridge in the country with secular medieval buildings.

It dates from the mid-twelfth century and was extended later in the middle ages; there was a major restoration of the timber-framed buildings in 1902 shortly after this photograph was taken.

The river Witham under the bridge was deepened and made navigable in the 1790s.

Postcard, c1900

Lincoln High Bridge, medieval building,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Unposted and undated Kingsway Real Photo Series card
IA and Bridges, Hign Bridge, Lincoln, Glory Hole
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

View of High Bridge from the east.

Stokes' cafe is seen over the bridge, with the Marks and Spencer store  - almost brand new at the time of the photo - to the left.

Frith postcard, 1939

IA and Bridges, Lincoln High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

Another view of the bridge form the west taken from the south bank.

undated postcard

IA and Bridges, Lincoln High Bridge
Lincoln, Holmes Road, Lifting Bridge
Lincoln, Holmes Road, Lifting Bridge
Lincoln, Holmes Road, Lifting Bridge

At the western end of the Brayford where the Fossdyke begins this lifting bridge gave access from Carholme Road via Holmes Road to the Holmes Yard railway goods depot.

The roof of the depot is seen at the top left of the picture; immediately below is the bridge operator's cabin.

This bridge frequently caused traffic delays in the Brayford area.

It is now the location of the high level road bridge completed a few years ago.

The University of Lincoln occupies the site of the goods depot.

Doris Longbottom, c1970

Lincoln, Brayford, Holmes Road, lifting bridge,
Lincoln, Lifting Bridge
Lincoln, Lifting Bridge
Lincoln, Lifting Bridge
IA and Bridges,
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge

Much of the workers' housing for the major engineering companies of Clayton and Shuttleworth and Ruston, Proctor was on the north side of the Witham, whereas the factories were on Waterside South.

Consequently this footbridge, midway between the Magpie road bridge (on Broadgate) and Stamp End Lock, had remarkably heavy use.

Ken Redmore

Lincoln, Montague Street bridge, Clayton & Shuttleworth, Ruston Proctor,
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge

Plaque on the Montague Street Bridge, which was built by J T B Porter & Co at their Gowt's Bridge Foundry off the lower High Street in Lincoln.

The firm specialised in gas works installation, but they also made a wide range of castings for bridges and street furniture.

Ken Redmore, 2011

Lincoln, Montague Street bridge, Porter, Gowts Bridge,
Mayfield Bridge
Mayfield Bridge
Mayfield Bridge

The Old Mayfield Bridge, linking Waterside North to Sincil Street, was built in 1868 by Michael Penistan and replaced by a new bridge in March 1958.

IA and Bridges, Mayfield Bridge, Michael Penistan
Mayfield Bridge
Mayfield Bridge
Mayfield Bridge

The second Mayfield Bridge, built in1958.

undated photograph

IA and Bridges, Mayfield Bridge
Pelham Bridge
Pelham Bridge
Pelham Bridge

This photograph taken in January 1958 looks northwards from Pelham Bridge shortly before its completion.

IA and Bridges, Pelham Bridge