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Louth
 
Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital
Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital
Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital

Crowtree Lane Hospital was built in 1873 at a cost of £2000 to replace the dispensary in New Street.

After the former workhouse on High Holme Road was developed as the main hospital for the town in 1938, Crowtree Lane dealt with maternity patients only.

It is now part of King Edward VI School.

Ken Redmore, 2006

Louth, Crowtree Lane Hospital,
Louth, Holy Trinity
Louth, Holy Trinity
Louth, Holy Trinity

A fire in 1991 destroyed all but the tower of the Victorian church of 1866 by Rogers & Marsden.  The tower has an octagonal top and an unusually high stair turret.

The new nave and community rooms were opened in 1999.

September 2012

Louth, Holy Trinity church, Rogers & Marsden
Louth, Holy Trinity
Louth, Holy Trinity
Louth, Holy Trinity

Holy Trinity, a Victorian church of 1866, was severely damaged by fire in 1991.

Opened in 1999, the new building with its attractive spire, was designed as a community centre and incorporates meeting rooms and catering facilities as well as a modern worship space.

September 2012

Louth, Holy Trinity church, fire
Louth, Hubbard's Hills
Louth, Hubbard's Hills
Louth, Hubbard's Hills

This rustic wooden shelter in Hubbard's Hills was one of four given by local Member of Parliament, R W Perks, at a total cost of £100, when the park was first opened in 1907.

Undated postcard

Louth, Hubbard's Hills, R W Perks
Louth, Hubbard's Hills
Louth, Hubbard's Hills
Louth, Hubbard's Hills

Hubbard's Hills is a deep wooded valley to the south-west of the town. It was acquired for the town using a generous bequest from Alphonse Pahud, a language teacher at Louth Grammar School.

card posted 1940s

Louth, Hubbard's Hills, Alphonse Pahud, Louth Grammar School
Louth, Independent Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel

The Independent Chapel in Cannon Street was built 1828, superseding the former Countess of Huntingdon Chapel bought in 1800.

It was taken out of use 1928, first becoming a cinema, then offices.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Louth, Independent Chapel, Cannon Street, Countess of Huntingdon
Louth, Julian's Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill

The four-storey mill on the Lud and at the beginning of Grimsby Road (former A16) was known at one time as Bridge Street Mill or St Mary’s Mill.

The position of two former undershot waterwheels can be seen on the wall at river level.

April 2013

Louth, Julian's Mill, Bridge Street Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill

The mill was built be Francis Julian, a French immigrant builder, in 1755.

The mill is built of brick in Flemish Bond, with burnt headers for decorative effect.

April 2013

Louth, Julian's Mill, Francis Julian
Louth, Julian's Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill
Louth, Julian's Mill

Exceptionally heavy rain in the Wolds immediately to the west of Louth caused the small River Lud to flood much of the town.

Several buildings – mainly houses – were destroyed and 23 lives were lost.

This marker can be seen on the front right corner of the mill in the general photo of the building.

April 2013

Louth, Julian's Mill, flood
Louth, Little Eastgate
Louth, Little Eastgate
Louth, Little Eastgate

The view from the tower of St James's Church, Louth, looking towards the town centre along Little Eastgate is remarkably similar to that depicted in a fine panorama painted by William Brown in 1844.

The street leading away in the centre of the picture is Eastgate, dominated by the Town Hall of 1854, a large brick building with stone dressings and balustrade.

Brown's Panorama hangs in the Council Chamber.

Mark Acton, 2008

Louth, view from church tower, Eastgate, Brown panorama, Town Hall,
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line

The east side of Louth had several parks which have been taken into the growing town.  One such was Stewton House Park.

The railway from Boston cut through it so that land to the west of the line was sold off for large houses and gardens and that to the east is mostly housing estate.

The railway has gone but the route is still there and converted to a pleasant tree-lined footpath.

Louth, East Coast Line, Railway, footpath
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line

This information board alongside the footpath to the south-east of the town centre gives details of the former East Lincolnshire Line which passed through Louth.

 

Louth, East Lincolnshire Railway Line, footpath
Louth, Railway Station
Louth, Railway Station
Louth, Railway Station

Opened in 1848, Louth station was on the East Lincolnshire Railway, opened in 1848.

The Tudor Gothic style with a large porte-cochère, (covered carriage entrance), over the main doorway was designed to give a sense of occasion to travelling by train. Furthermore, it was the entrance for all, not just the well to do as would be the case in the country house which its design resembled.

Passenger trains ceased in 1970 but goods trains to the malthouse alongside the station ran for another ten years.

This building has since been converted into apartments.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Louth, Railway station
Louth, St James
Louth, St James
Louth, St James

St James's Church in Louth, viewed from Westgate. The magnificent Perpendicular spire, 295 ft high, was completed in 1515.

Westgate has some very fine Georgian houses, including buildings belonging to the Grammar School.

Postcard, c1910

Louth, St James, spire, Westgate, Grammar School,
Louth, St Michael
Louth, St Michael
Louth, St Michael

St Michael’s dates from 1863 and was designed in Gothic style by Louth architect James Fowler.

The lofty interior is largely brick - mostly red, but with black and yellow decoration - and is lavishly furnished.

The Lady Chapel, with its apse, dates from 1908.

September 2012

Louth, St Michael church, James Fowler, Lady Chapel
Louth, Thorpe Hall Mill
Louth, Thorpe Hall Mill
Louth, Thorpe Hall Mill

Thorpe Hall Mill (TF 320871) was built in the eighteenth century as a papermill and was converted for corn grinding in about 1840.

At one time it was 5 storeys high and fifty feet long with an 18-foot waterwheel.

It continued in use as a corn mill until about 1920; in the recent past it has been used as a trout farm.

Print by J W Wilson, 1840

Louth, papermill, river Lud, Thorpe Hall,
Louth, Thorpe Hall Mill
Louth, Thorpe Hall Mill
Louth, Thorpe Hall Mill

Thorpe Hall Mill (TF 320871) was built in the eighteenth century as a papermill and was converted for corn grinding in about 1840.

At one time it was 5 storeys high and fifty feet long with an 18-foot waterwheel.

It continued in use as a corn mill until about 1920; in the recent past it has been used as a trout farm.

undated postcard
Louth, paper mill
Louth, Toll Cottage
Louth, Toll Cottage
Louth, Toll Cottage

The route across the Wolds from Louth to Horncastle became a turnpike following the Louth Turnpike Act of 1770.

This early 19th century toll cottage is about 1 mile SW of the centre of Louth and stands at the corner of Horncastle Road and Halfpenny Lane (TF 319860).

Frank Robinson, 2010

Louth, toll cottage house, Halfpenny Lane,
Thorpe Hall, Louth
Thorpe Hall, Louth
Thorpe Hall, Louth

The earliest part of the house is 1584.

It was acquired by the Bolle family (originally from Swineshead, and also at Haugh).

The house was rebuilt in the late 17th century and was extensively restored in the 20th.

More details about this house and its owners can be found in T R Leach's book, 'Lincolnshire Country Houses and their Families: Part 1', published by SLHA.  Buy a copy.

Louth, Thorpe Hall, Bolle