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Potterhanworth
 
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church

The foundation stone for this chapel in Barff Road was laid in 1888. A hall for the Sunday School and community use was opened in 1962.

July 2011


Potterhanworth, Methodist Church
Potterhanworth, Methodist Sunday School, banner
Potterhanworth, Methodist Sunday School, banner
Potterhanworth, Methodist Sunday School, banner
Methodist Church Sunday schools often owned banners such as this, to be used in parades and at other special events.
Potterhanworth, Methodist Church banner
Potterhanworth, Railway Station
Potterhanworth, Railway Station
Potterhanworth, Railway Station

Great Eastern and Great Northern Joint Railway carrying trains between East Anglia to south Yorkshire and beyond opened in 1882.

It was created from a mix of existing railway routes together with one new section, that from Spalding to Lincoln, also opened in 1882. Potterhanworth station was on this latter stretch.

It was built to the same architectural design as the other village stations on the new line.

The station closed to passengers in 1955 and for goods in 1964.

The line remains open but the building in this photograph has since been demolished.

Peter Grey Archive, 1971

Potterhanworth, railway station
Potterhanworth, St Andrew
Potterhanworth, St Andrew
Potterhanworth, St Andrew

St Andrew’s was rebuilt in 1854 by R C Hussey, replacing the earlier Georgian  building.

The church comprises a nave of 4 bays, north aisle and chancel, all with Decorated style windows.

The tower, however, is largely 14th century.

July 2011

Potterhanworth, St Andrew, R C Hussey
Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe
Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe
Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe

The analysis of the petrology of Neolithic stone axes has been an important element of their study for the last few decades.

Understanding the sources of the stone used has enabled a greater understanding of trade routes and the desirability of certain materials. 

Petrological study is also highlighting when axes are made from exotic stones, which hint at far wider patterns of trade and cultural connection.

This axe, from Potterhanworth, is one such object.  It is made from jadeite sourced in the foothills of Monte Viso in the Italian Alps.  It was made around 4,000BC but probably entered Britain a few centuries later.

Only a handful of axes of this type are known from Britain.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe, Mount Viso
Potterhanworth, Water Tower
Potterhanworth, Water Tower
Potterhanworth, Water Tower

The water tower in Potterhanworth was built in 1903 and financed by an endowment from Christ’s Hospital.

A capacity of 37,000 gallons was supplied from a 150 foot deep artesian bore hole.

The rooms beneath the tank were used by the Home Guard in World War 2. Redundant in 1978, the building was converted into a private home in 1995.

Mark Acton, 2013

Potterhanworth, water tower, Home Guard