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Skendleby
 
Skendleby, Giants Hill, Long Barrow
Skendleby, Giants Hill, Long Barrow
Skendleby, Giants Hill, Long Barrow

This is all that remains of the Giants Hills Neolithic long barrow.

The principal remaining barrow is 200ft (60m) long and 5ft (1.5m) high at TF 428711.

Excavation in the 1930s revealed a timber enclosure and the skeletons of eight individuals. Construction of the barrow began in about 3000 BC, with use continuing for about 1000 years.

Two other barrows were originally nearby - four more survive in this part of the Wolds.


Frank Robinson, 2010

Skendleby, long barrow, neolithic, Giants Hill,
Skendleby, main street
Skendleby, main street
Skendleby, main street

Skendleby is a small village 4 miles north east of Spilsby.

The possible remains of St James Chapel, Skendleby Priory, were excavated in 2005.

Nearby RAF Skendleby operated as a Chain Home Low radar station between 1941-45 and served as a ground control intercept station during the Cold War.

Skendleby, school
Skendleby, Nuclear Bunker
Skendleby, Nuclear Bunker
Skendleby, Nuclear Bunker

This nuclear bunker (TF 442708), set in the beauty of the Lincolnshire Wolds, is a grim reminder of Cold War days.

Above ground here are four ventilation shafts, and this 'bungalow' (whose 'windows' are actually painted on concrete).

Below ground the nuclear bunker, last developed in the 1980s, could house a regional seat of government, and accommodate over 100 people.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Skendleby, nuclear bunker, cold war,
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul

St Peter and St Paul has many 14th century features, notably the windows - such as the east one seen here - with reticulated or flowing tracery.

The church was extensively restored by Sir G G Scott in 1875.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul church, G G Scott
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul

The tower and chancel are in ashlar limestone, the chancel is local greenstone with limestone dressing.

September 2015

Skendleby, St Peter and St Paul church
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul

G G Scott's restoration of 1875 provided ashlar limestone for the tower and nave - and presumably the rather modest porch.

The two windows in the nave have reticulated tracery of the fourteenth century.

September 2015

Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul church
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul

View from the south.

July 2016

Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul church
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, font
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, font
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, font

The octagonal font has a panelled stem and moulded bowl on large heads. There is a top band of fleurons with small heads.

September 2015

Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul church, font
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, interior
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, interior
Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, interior

The simple interior of St Peter & St Paul, looking east.

According to Pevsner, the position of the tower (north of the church's east-west axis) suggests there was once a north aisle, but the chancel and chancel arch (symmetrically positioned) contradict this supposition.

Perhaps the N arcade was taken out before the chancel arch was built, surmises Pevsner.

September 2015

Skendleby, St Peter & St Paul, interior