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Stenigot
 
Stenigot, Accommodation Bridge
Stenigot, Accommodation Bridge
Stenigot, Accommodation Bridge

This small accommodation bridge within the Stenigot Estate remains in excellent condition almost 60 years after the closure of the Louth to Bardney branch.

It linked areas of permanent pasture and was also close to woodland developed for game shooting.

May 2013

Stenigot, Louth Bardney railway accommodation bridge
Stenigot, New Farm Cottages
Stenigot, New Farm Cottages
Stenigot, New Farm Cottages

This house and cottages were built between the wars alongside the main road through the village near the church.

undated postcard

Stenigot, new farm cottages
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Chain Home Radar Station
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Chain Home Radar Station
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Chain Home Radar Station

This 360ft (110m) high steel lattice tower at Stenigot (TF 257825) is the only survivor of four transmitting towers forming part of RAF Stenigot Chain Home Radar Station.

The Chain Home system, developed during the Second World War, was the world's first air defence radar system.

Although the site is known as RAF Stenigot it is actually in the parish of Donington.


Chris Lester, 1997

Stenigot, Chain Holme Radar, RAF Stenigot, lattice tower,
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Radar Station
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Radar Station
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Radar Station

A view of RAF Stenigot from the top of the surviving transmitter tower, looking north, taken in 1995.

The building in the left foreground housed a 1950s GEE-H Master Station used for aircraft navigation.

To its right can be seen the bases of another of the four Chain Home transmitter masts.

The building in the right foreground is the Slave Receiver hut of the original wartime GEE installation. Beyond that is the water tower and beyond that is the Standby Set House which housed a diesel generator to provide emergency power.

The 1960s NATO ACE HIGH tropospheric scatter station is located in the fenced compound beyond it.

It is obstructing sight of the Chain Home Receiver building although the four concrete bases of one of the receiver masts can be seen beyond the fence and to the right of the dishes.

Approximately 120 RAF personnel manned the Chain Home site, including police and anti-aircraft gunners to protect it.

Chris Lester, 1995

Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Home Chain Radar Station, tropospheric scatter,
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Receiver Building
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Receiver Building
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Receiver Building

This building housed the radar receivers, a calculator room which converted the raw radar data into grid references and altitudes, and a plotting area which was manned largely by WAAFs.

It was situated between four 73 m (240 ft) high wooden receiver masts arranged in a rhomboid pattern.

This Grade II listed building was recently demolished.

Chris Lester, 1995

Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, radar, receiver building,
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Site View
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Site View
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Site View

An extended view of the former RAF Stenigot site which includes, to the left, the huge dismantled dishes - each 60ft (18m) across - of the ACE-HIGH microwave NATO communication system, in use from about 1960 to the 1980s.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, radar,
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Standby Set House
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Standby Set House
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Standby Set House

This fully-protected installation comprised a Mirlees Blackstone diesel engine driving a 60 KVA electrical generator to provide emergency power in the event of a failure of the mains supply.

It was demolished in 1996.

Chris Lester, 1995

Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, radar, standby set house,
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Transmitter Building
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Transmitter Building
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Transmitter Building

Two radar transmitters operating in what today would be called the Short Wave Bands were housed in this building.

The building, which is Listed Grade II is protected by blast walls and a layer of gravel on the roof contained within the brick walls, which are visible above the blast walls.

Chris Lester, 1995

Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Radar, transmitter building,
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Water Tower
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Water Tower
Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, Water Tower

The radar site is located on top of a hill at 151 m above Ordnance Datum and a good supply of water would have been required for fire-fighting.

It was demolished in 1996. The "domestic” site located half a mile away to the NE had its own water tower which survives today.


Chris Lester, 1995

Stenigot, RAF Stenigot, radar, water tower,
Stenigot, Railway Tunnel
Stenigot, Railway Tunnel
Stenigot, Railway Tunnel

Bridges and tunnel portals along the Louth to Bardney line were strengthened by tie rods and plates as part of the original construction.

This is an example of the design which was common on the line.

May 2013

Stenigot, railway tunnel, tie bar boss end
Stenigot, Railway Tunnel
Stenigot, Railway Tunnel
Stenigot, Railway Tunnel

This is the western portal to the Withcall Tunnel on the former line between Louth and Bardney and is on private land.

The tunnel lies between the parishes of Withcall and Stenigot and passes under the Bluestone Heath Road.

It is 888m (971yds) long and was opened in 1876.

May 2013

Stenigot, railway tunnel, Bardney to Lincoln
Stenigot, St Nicholas
Stenigot, St Nicholas
Stenigot, St Nicholas

Small red brick church of 1892. St Nicholas, Stenigot, contains monuments, two members of the de Guevara family who came to England with Catherine of Aragon.

They had lost their property by 1660 – the last member of the family was a hairdresser in Market Rasen.

Building locked with no key information.

Mark Acton, 2012

Stenigot, St Nicholas church, de Guevara, Catherine of Aragon