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Archaeology - Medieval
 
Bardney, Abbey, column
Bardney, Abbey, column
Bardney, Abbey, column

Photograph of a column at Bardney Abbey, during excavations undertaken by the Reverend Laing between 1909 and 1914.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Bardney, Abbey, column, Reverend Laing
Bardney, Abbey, excavators
Bardney, Abbey, excavators
Bardney, Abbey, excavators

Photograph of a group of excavators at Bardney Abbey, during excavations undertaken by the Reverend Laing between 1909 and 1914.  Reverend Laing himself sits at the centre.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Bardney, Abbey, group laing
Bardney, Abbey, inside west front
Bardney, Abbey, inside west front
Bardney, Abbey, inside west front

Photograph of the inner side of the west front at Bardney Abbey, during excavations undertaken by the Reverend Laing between 1909 and 1914.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Bardney, Abbey west front Laing
Beesby, ridge and furrow
Beesby, ridge and furrow
Beesby, ridge and furrow

Snow emphasises the pattern of ridge and furrow near the site of Beesby deserted medieval village (2 miles south-west of North Thoresby, at TF 267 967).

Frank Robinson, March 2013

Beesby, ridge and furrow
Boston, Hussey Tower
Boston, Hussey Tower
Boston, Hussey Tower

The Hussey Tower, close to the centre of Boston (TF 331436), is one of the earliest brick buildings in Lincolnshire (c1460).

It was built by Richard Benyngton JP as part of a larger domestic complex.

Among the surviving architectural features of interest are a brick vaulted ceiling and an octagonal stair turret.

It is in the care of the Heritage Trust for Lincolnshire on behalf of the owners, Boston Borough Council.

Postcard, c1910
Boston, tower, benyngton,
Calceby, St Andrew
Calceby, St Andrew
Calceby, St Andrew

The chalk remains of the church of St Andrew, Calceby, (TF389757) stand among the lumps and bumps of the deserted medieval village.

It is one of eight medieval villages on the eastern side of the Wolds marked on the OS Explorer maps.

Frank Robinson, 2009

Calceby, church,
Exchequergate
Exchequergate
Exchequergate

The oldest of the gates which were built along with walls to fortify the Cathedral precincts, Exchequer Gate dates from the fourteenth century.

Inside the arches there is vaulting with diagonal and ridge-ribs.

SLHA occupied the northern section of this building, (as an office) for a period of time during the 1980s.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Exchequergate, Cathedral,
Great Ponton, Ellys Manor House
Great Ponton, Ellys Manor House
Great Ponton, Ellys Manor House

The most spectacular feature of Great Ponton's Ellys Manor is the early 16th century wall paintings which are widely regarded as the finest domestic wall paintings in Britain.

They feature trees and other lush plant life shading deer and peacocks in a French tapestry style.

Great Ponton, wall paintings,
Langton by Spilsby, sheep walks
Langton by Spilsby, sheep walks
Langton by Spilsby, sheep walks

These steep slopes near Langton are extensively terraced and have served as sheep walks in modern times.

These features are said to be strip lynchets of medieval origin - though popular legend claims they were ‘Roman vineyards’!

Frank Robinson, February 2013

Langton By Spilsby, strip lynchet, sheep walk
Lincoln, medieval roof tile
Lincoln, medieval roof tile
Lincoln, medieval roof tile

This glazed roof tile once adorned the roof of a Medieval building in Lincoln.  Such ridge decoration was once commonplace, and often featured mythical creatures and caricatures.

This tile has a human face on both sides and it has been suggested from the depiction that the face may represent that of a Jew.

Lincoln’s Medieval Jewish community was large, and although some of its members ranked among the wealthiest in the land, though not all of Lincoln’s Jews were so well off.

Sadly, Lincoln had its part to play in the persecution of the Jews which led to their expulsion from Britain in 1290.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Archaeology, medieval roof tile, Jewish community,
Marshchapel, saltern
Marshchapel, saltern
Marshchapel, saltern

Low mounds, scattered over several square miles in this part of the Marsh, are the ploughed over spoil heaps of an earlier salt industry (by the evaporation of sea water).

Individual ‘salterns’, like this one, can be identified with those shown on a Marshchapel parish map of 1595.

Frank Robinson, November 2013

Marshchapel, saltern, salt extraction
North Ormsby, medieval village
North Ormsby, medieval village
North Ormsby, medieval village

The earthworks of the medieval village extend for 500m on the south side of a shallow valley, between the present village to the east and the site of a medieval priory to the west.

Seen here are some of the rectangular enclosures between the stream and a hollow way.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

North Ormsby, deserted medieval village
North Ormsby, medieval village
North Ormsby, medieval village
North Ormsby, medieval village

Earthworks and trackways near the site of the medieval priory of North Ormsby.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

North Ormsby, deserted medieval village
Pottergate Arch
Pottergate Arch
Pottergate Arch

This impressive medieval archway was extensively restored in 1884.

It is the south-east gateway to the Cathedral Close, though now passed on either side by the modern road.

It is constructed of local dressed stone and ashlar with rubble core and a lead roof.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Pottergate Arch,
Scredington, Packhorse Bridge
Scredington, Packhorse Bridge
Scredington, Packhorse Bridge

The two-arched packhorse bridge at Scredington (TF 097409), constructed in c1250, now carries a footpath over a village stream.

Close by are the remains of a moat and the extensive site of a medieval manor.


Stewart Squires, 2004

Scredington, pack horse bridge, moat,
Tattershall, Medieval whistle
Tattershall, Medieval whistle
Tattershall, Medieval whistle

This glazed ceramic whistle is in the form of a jester’s head and was discovered at Tattershall in 1980 and dates to the 16th Century.

Such representations are rare and the whistle may have formed part of a jester’s equipment.

Although not found at Tattershall Castle, the whistle may have some connection to festivities held there.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Tattershall, ceramic whistle, jester
Tithe Barn
Tithe Barn
Tithe Barn

The Tithe Barn dating from c1440 stands to the south of Vicars Court in Lincoln, below the cathedral.

It initially served as a warehouse but was probably put to use at some time as an infirmary or refectory.

2005

Lincoln, Tithe Barn, Vicars Court,
West Rasen, Packhorse Bridge
West Rasen, Packhorse Bridge
West Rasen, Packhorse Bridge

This packhorse bridge is about 20 metres long and crosses the River Rase in West Rasen, about 3 miles west of Market Rasen (TF 063893).

It is said to have been built in the early 1300s by the then Bishop of Lincoln, who also built a bridge over the Ancholme, two miles away at the place now known as Bishopbridge.

Pevsner, however, dates the bridge to the 15th century.

F Robinson, 2010

West Rasen, packhorse bridge, Bishopbridge