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Industry - Bricks and Tiles
 
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard

Hacks or drying sheds at Blyth's brick and tile yard, Ings Lane, Barton on Humber (TF 023 233).

This site was one of 40 brick and tile making yards on the south bank of the Humber in the late 19th century (13 were in Barton).

The total output was about 40 million pieces per annum.

Blyth's yard to the west of the Humber Bridge closed in 2006; one other yard remains in production. 

Ken Redmore, 2007

Barton Upon Humber, tiles, blyth's,
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard

Open side of a hack at Blyth's brick and tile yard, Ings Lane, Barton on Humber.

Bricks and pantiles were made on this 30 acre site for about 130 years.

Clay was dug from the rear of the site furthest from the river.

Bricks and tiles were made by hand (later by machine) close by, and the "green" pieces then dried in these open-sided covered racks until ready for firing. 

Ken Redmore, 2007

Barton Upon Humber, tiles, pantiles,
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard
Barton upon Humber, Blyth's tile yard

Interior of a hack at Blyth's brick and tile yard, Barton on Humber.

Pantiles were the principal product of the yards on the Humber bank, especially in the twentieth century.

Blyth's yard had three kilns, latterly of the down-draught, intermittent type.

The yard at one time had its own jetty for exporting finished tiles (as far as London) and importing coal from south Yorkshire for firing the kilns. 

Ken Redmore, 2007

Barton Upon Humber, tiles, pantiles,
Baumber, Brick Kiln
Baumber, Brick Kiln
Baumber, Brick Kiln

Brick kiln at Baumber (TF 195 752), in the south-west corner of the parish.

This kiln type, similar to the scotch kiln but with vaulted brick roof and vents is found occasionally in Lincolnshire (eg, see Farlesthorpe) but seldom elsewhere.

The Baumber kiln was worked from c1870-95, principally by the Hutchinson & Jordan families. It was restored in 1986 for the owner, Mrs Fawcett, by Martin Hammond. 

Ken Redmore, 2006

Baumber, kiln, bricks, scotch,
Farlesthorpe, Brick Kiln
Farlesthorpe, Brick Kiln
Farlesthorpe, Brick Kiln

The Brick kiln at Farlesthorpe (TF 480 739), is a very similar size and layout to the Baumber kiln (see Baumber).

The local clay - low in iron and high in chalk content - produced grey-yellow bricks, many of which were used in the second half of the 19th century in nearby Alford.

In recent times the kiln and the two reconstructed lean-to firing sheds either side have been used as farm implement stores.

Ken Redmore, 2006

Farlesthorpe, bricks, clay,
Farlesthorpe, Brick Kiln
Farlesthorpe, Brick Kiln
Farlesthorpe, Brick Kiln

The interior of the brick kiln at Farlesthorpe shows the vaulted brick roof with its range of ventilation holes and the fire-holes at ground level.

"Green" bricks, possibly together with tiles and drainage pipes, were packed in a spaced, regular fashion in the kiln so that hot gases from combustion of coal in the sixteen fire-holes passed slowly through.

The process of brick making in the kiln through loading, heating up, cooling down and unloading had taken almost a fortnight.

Ken Redmore, 2006


 

Farlesthorpe, brick,
Lincoln, River Witham at Stamp End Lock
Lincoln, River Witham at Stamp End Lock
Lincoln, River Witham at Stamp End Lock

This lithographic print dated 1837 just predates the rapid industrialisation of Lincoln in the mid-19th century.

The view across the Witham shows Stamp End Lock in the foreground.

Clayton and Shuttleworth established their foundry and engineering works next to the Witham beyond the lock in the 1840s.

Behind the barge on the right are the smoking kilns (or clamps?) of John Gourley's brickyard.

S T Davies, 1837

Lincoln, river Witham, Stamp End Lock, Clayton & Shuttleworth, Gourley, brick kilns,
Stamford, Terra Cotta Works
Stamford, Terra Cotta Works
Stamford, Terra Cotta Works

The fine entrance to Blashfield's terra cotta works on Wharf Road, Stamford, have been retained even though the site behind has been completely redeveloped.

J N Blashfield moved from London to Stamford in 1859 and made ornamental and decorative tiles here.

J C Grant, agricultural implement maker and iron founder, had occupied the site for the previous 15 years.

The terra cotta works closed in 1875.


Ken Redmore, 2010

Stamford, Blashfield, terra cotta
Sutton on Sea, Brick Kiln
Sutton on Sea, Brick Kiln
Sutton on Sea, Brick Kiln

Sutton On Sea Brick Kiln, (TF 504 808), is very similar to the kilns at Baumber and Farlesthorpe except for the absence of lean-to firing sheds.

(These lightweight structures have been removed in this kiln, though their bases remain.)

Bricks were produced here from about 1860 until the 1930s. This reflects the growth of Sutton as a seaside resort over this period, especially after the railway arrived.

Ken Redmore, 2006

Sutton On Sea, brick kiln,
Thornton Curtis, Abbey Gatehouse
Thornton Curtis, Abbey Gatehouse
Thornton Curtis, Abbey Gatehouse

The impressive brick and stone barbican and gatehouse of Thornton Abbey were built in the late 14th century.

They are considered by English Heritage to be 'the largest and among the finest in England'.

This is the earliest surviving brick structure in Lincolnshire.


Frank Robinson, 2010

Thornton Curtis, abbey gatehouse, barbican
Wainfleet All Saints, School
Wainfleet All Saints, School
Wainfleet All Saints, School

Wainfleet was the birthplace of William Waynflete, who became Bishop of Winchester and Chancellor of England in the 15th century.

Wainfleet School was founded in 1484 by Waynflete as a feeder school for his other foundation, Magdalen College Oxford.

This fine red brick building was in continual use as a school until the 1980s; it now houses the local museum and library.

Frank Robinson, 2007

Wainfleet All Saints, Magdalen School, William Waynflete, brick,
Willoughby, St Helen
Willoughby, St Helen
Willoughby, St Helen

St Helen's is built principally of local greenstone (or Spilsby Sandstone), not the most durable of building materials. As in several other churches in the locality, brick has been used for repairs.

The bricks here appear to be 18th century or earlier.  Several have been laid on edge.

August 2013

Willoughby, St Helen church, bricks
Withcall, Railway Station, Platform Edging
Withcall, Railway Station, Platform Edging
Withcall, Railway Station, Platform Edging

In the nineteenth century the edges of railway platforms were usually made of hard blue coping bricks, as shown here at Withcall station on the Bardney to Louth line (completed 1876).

Similar bricks made by Joseph Hamblet of West Bromwich were also used in station buildings, bridges and other railway structures at many Lincolnshire lines built in this period.

For example, they are seen on the Midland and Great Northern Railway between Bourne and Little Bytham, constructed in the period 1890-93.

The platforms on this line were reconstructed some time after the GNR bought the line from the original company.

Ken Redmore, 2009

Withcall, railway station, platform edging, Joseph Hamblet,