Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Infrastructure - Railways and Tramways
 
Aby, Railway Shed
Aby, Railway Shed
Aby, Railway Shed

The GNR East Lincolnshire line from Peterborough to Grimsby via Spalding and Boston provided a good passenger service for the eastern part of Lincolnshire to and from London until it closed post-Beeching in 1970.

As with other rural stations on the route, Aby had a short siding with a goods shed designed to provide shelter for loaded railway wagons.

This substantial red brick building now provides good storage for the local landowner.

Ken Redmore, 2004 

Aby, railway, goods shed, GNR
Bardney, Railway Bridge
Bardney, Railway Bridge
Bardney, Railway Bridge

The railway line across the Wolds from Louth through Wragby to Bardney was opened in 1876 and closed in 1960.

On the stretch between Bardney and Wragby there are very few surviving features of the line.

The station at Kingthorpe has been completely demolished; a crossing keeper's house on Abbey Lane, Bardney is much altered.

However, this fine bridge over a drain close to the B1202 one mile north of Bardney (TF 123 712) remains in good original condition.

Ken Redmore, 2009

Bardney, bridge, railway,
Bardney, Railway Station
Bardney, Railway Station
Bardney, Railway Station

The Lincoln to Boston line was opened in 1848 as part of the Great Northern Railway’s Lincolnshire Loop Line.

It followed the route of the River Witham for much of its 37 mile length. It became the junction for the Bardney to Louth line in 1874.

The distinctive Italianate style of these buildings was inspired by Queen Victoria and Prince Albert who used it for their palace at Osborne House on the Isle of Wight, built 1845-51.

The line closed for passenger trains in 1970 but trains continued to visit the adjacent sugar beet factory until 1981.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Bardney, railway station, Lincolnshire Loop Line, Italianate
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station

The spartan station at Barton seen here in 1981.

Opened in 1846, the station had, on the goods platform seen to the left, a rare open sided goods shed. On the passenger platform was a traditional set of brick buildings.

What is shown here comprises a series of improvements implemented as part of the opening of the Humber Bridge in June 1981 at which time the station became an important part of the public transport link between Grimsby and Hull via the bridge.

Peter Grey Archive, 1981

Barton Upon Humber, railway station,
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station
Barton upon Humber, Railway Station

There was only one platform for passengers at Barton Station, on the south side of the line.

The old station buildinbgs were demolished in the 1980s and the modern minimal structure completed in 1998.

Peesps postcard, published in Barton upon Humber, undated

 

Barton Upon Humber, Railway station
Benniworth, High Street Tunnel
Benniworth, High Street Tunnel
Benniworth, High Street Tunnel

High Street Tunnel, 510m (560 yds) long, is the shorter of the two tunnels on the Louth to Bardney line.

It passes under Caistor High Street (B1225) about 1 mile north of Benniworth village and lies between the former stations at Donington on Bain and South Willingham.

It was opened in September 1875.  (The far end of the tunnel can just be seen in this photograph.)

May 2013

Benniworth, High Street Tunnel, South Willingham
Boston, Railway Bridge
Boston, Railway Bridge
Boston, Railway Bridge

This shows the railway bridge carrying the Great Northern Railway across the river Witham on the upstream side of the Grand Sluice at Boston.

The iron bridge designed by Richard Johnson, GNR's chief engineer, was opened on 28 May 1885 to replace the original wooden bridge of 1848.

Postcard, 1909

 

Boston, bridge, gnr, grand sluice,
Boston, Railway Station
Boston, Railway Station
Boston, Railway Station

Opened in 1848, Boston was an important station at the junction of the line from Grimsby to Peterborough with the line from Boston to Grantham and Nottingham.

Seen here in 1970, it was about to lose the through services with the closure of the former route.

Today it is served by trains running between Nottingham and Skegness.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Boston, railway station
Bourne, Railway Station Complex
Bourne, Railway Station Complex
Bourne, Railway Station Complex

This fine brick warehouse is on the site of the former Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway line and part of the station complex at Bourne.

The M&GNJR line between Saxby (Leicestershire) in the west and Bourne was opened in 1893 to link up with the company's earlier cross-country line to Sutton Bridge and Kings Lynn.

The Great Northern Railway also ran a north-south line (Sleaford to Stamford) through the town.

Chris Lester, 2004
Bourne, railway, MGNJR, warehouse,
Bourne, Red Hall
Bourne, Red Hall
Bourne, Red Hall

Red Hall, of c1600, was used as a passenger station and station master's house from the arrival of the railway in Bourne in 1861 until it closed in 1959 (although a goods branch remained until 1965).

From the grounds a glimpse can be had of the goods warehouse.

Bourne, railway, station, Red Hall,
Brocklesby, Railway Station
Brocklesby, Railway Station
Brocklesby, Railway Station

Built about 1848 for the MS and L Railway Company, this Brocklesby Station was conveniently close to Brocklesby Hall, the seat of the Earl of Yarborough who was then the company chairman.

In April 1849 Prince Albert arrived here by royal train to be the guest of the Earl before continuing to Grimsby next day, with great ceremony, to lay the foundation stone of the new dock.

The station closed in the 1990s. Photo taken from road bridge over the railway.

Frank Robinson, 2010
Brocklesby, railway, MS&L, Yarborough,
Burgh le Marsh, Railway Station
Burgh le Marsh, Railway Station
Burgh le Marsh, Railway Station

An attractive composition of station house, platform buildings and signal box, Burgh le Marsh station remains surprisingly complete today despite its closure, along with the railway here, in 1970.

Until 1923 it was known simply as Burgh.

For over 20 years, until the line to Skegness from Firsby was opened, it was the nearest station to the seaside town, six miles away to the east.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

Burgh Le Marsh, railway station, Firsby
Cleethorpes, tram
Cleethorpes, tram
Cleethorpes, tram

Trams in 1892 left the Wheatsheaf in Cleethorpes for Grimsby every 15 minutes from 08.15 to 22.15.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, tram
Coningsby, Railway Station
Coningsby, Railway Station
Coningsby, Railway Station

Opened with what was known as the ‘New Line’, between Coningsby Junction and Bellwater Junction, in 1913, the line and station closed in 1970.

The station platforms are of timber, without large buildings on them. This was to reduce the weight at this location, sited as it was on the top of an embankment.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Coningsby, railway station, timber platform
Cowbit, Railway Station
Cowbit, Railway Station
Cowbit, Railway Station

The Great Eastern Railway opened a line between Spalding and March in Cambridgeshire in 1867, later to be linked by the GNR to Lincoln, a total distance of 122 miles.

Cowbit, the first station south of Spalding, was closed to passengers in 1961 and to freight in 1964.

The line between Spalding and March closed in 1982.

Cowbit, Railway Station, Spalding March
Donington on Bain, Railway Building
Donington on Bain, Railway Building
Donington on Bain, Railway Building

The tiny weighbridge hut survives near the entrance to the former station yard at Donington on Bain on the Louth to Bardney railway line, closed for passenger traffic in 1951 and 9 years later for goods.

Donington, at 70 metres above sea level, was the highest station on the line.

From here there were stiff climbs to tunnels through the Wolds to both west and east.

Ken Redmore, 2008

Donington On Bain, railway, weighbridge,
East Barkwith, Railway Station
East Barkwith, Railway Station
East Barkwith, Railway Station

The Louth to Bardney line had seven intermediate stations.

Five of these (Hallington, Donington on Bain, Hainton & South Willingham, East Barkwith and Wragby) had near identical station buildings, built in red and cream brick.

The station at East Barkwith (TF 172 811) was on the Panton Road, a few hundred yards south-east of the village centre.

Ken Redmore, 2009


 

East Barkwith, Panton, Louth to Bardney,
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station

This station, on the East Lincolnshire Railway line across the East Fen was opened in 1848.

Although the railway is still in use (Boston to Skegness line), Eastville Station was closed to passengers in 1961 and to goods traffic in 1964.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, railway station
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station
Eastville, Railway Station

East Ville station, between Firsby and Boston, opened in 1848.

Originally named East Ville & New Leake, it changed its name to East Ville in 1952. This is one of those occasional stations that the railway companies insisted on a slightly different name from that of the village it served.  The two words can be seen on the signal box in this 1971 view. The village was always Eastville locally.

On 11 September 1961 it was one of 25 rural stations in the County that lost its passenger trains, but goods trains continued to call until 1964.

Trains between Boston and Skegness still pass the site but the signal box and traditional crossing gates have gone.

Peter Grey Archive, 1971

Eastville, railway station, New Leake
Edenham, Railway Weighouse
Edenham, Railway Weighouse
Edenham, Railway Weighouse

The former Little Bytham to Edenham railway was laid down at his own personal expense by Lord Willoughby to bring passengers and goods - especially coal - to the centre of his estate at Grimsthorpe and to nearby Bourne.

It opened in 1856 and ran for a relatively short time.

Three stone buildings of the terminus survive at Edenham: the station building, engine shed and tiny weighhouse (shown here), all now subsumed within an extensive farmstead.

Ken Redmore, 2011

 

Edenham, Willoughby, Grimsthorpe, weighouse,
Firsby, Railway Station
Firsby, Railway Station
Firsby, Railway Station

The village of Firsby was rather small to have such a large and imposing station as this to serve it.

Opened in 1848 it became the junction station for trains to Spilsby in 1868 and Skegness, the first section of which opened to Wainfleet in 1871.

Closed with the line in 1970, the photograph shows the almost complete remains of its overall roof which it retained to the end.

Trains to Skegness now bypass the site to the south and little remains today of this once impressive collection of buildings.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

Firsby, railway station
Gainsborough, Railway Bridge
Gainsborough, Railway Bridge
Gainsborough, Railway Bridge

This bridge across the Trent was built in 1848/49 by John Fowler for the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway to carry the line from Grimsby to Sheffield.  It was later shared with the GNR line from Lincoln to Doncaster.

The two main spans of this bridge are tubular wrought iron girders of rectangular section, one of the earliest examples of such a structure.

The bridge was rebuilt in the early 1990s.

Photograph 1970

Gainsborough, railway bridge, John Fowler
Goxhill, Railway Station
Goxhill, Railway Station
Goxhill, Railway Station

Goxhill station was opened by the Great Central Railway in 1848 on its line from Grimsby to New Holland.

Today the station buildings are still largely complete but these buildings, on the northbound platform, have been demolished.

The station remains open but lost its goods services in 1964. Between 1912 and 1963 it was also the junction for passenger trains to and from Immingham Dock station.

Peter Grey Archive, 1981

Goxhill, railway station
Harlaxton, Manor, Service Tramway
Harlaxton, Manor, Service Tramway
Harlaxton, Manor, Service Tramway

At the rear of the Harlaxton Manor, from the elevated ground, runs a tramway which carried goods such as coal and other heavy raw materials for the kitchen and other service rooms located underneath.

The track still remains and at points along the tunnel are chutes for delivery of the goods to rooms below.

Mark Acton, 2008

Harlaxton, Manor, tramway,
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station

Branston and Heighington Station looking south. The bridge carries the new road to Branston over the line, the old Chapel Lane being diverted by a sharp right-angle bend to the left at the railway sidings and station.

Chapel Lane was re-named Station Road and the Bridge is Station Hill.

There was a staircase, for the convenience of Branston passengers, up onto the Bridge from this platform.

Heighington,
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station

Station buildings viewed from the west, across the line.

This Station is typical of all those along this line which was built to be especially strong to carry the heavy coal trains from the Midlands and the North to London so the passenger traffic on the main line was not delayed.

Heighington, Railway Station
Heighington, Railway Station Staff
Heighington, Railway Station Staff
Heighington, Railway Station Staff

Station staff just before the station closed.

Left George Creasey, porter; centre Mr Rogers, the last station master; right Len Rasen, junior porter.

Mr Rogers moved from the Station House to the right- hand side stone cottage opposite the Flagpole.

Len Rasen continued to work for British Rail and later moved to Chesterfield.

Heighington, Railway Station, staff
Heighington, Railway Station Closure Notice
Heighington, Railway Station Closure Notice
Heighington, Railway Station Closure Notice

Notice of station closure following the Beeching Report.

The passenger service (fare, 3d to Lincoln, six minutes) had been closed earlier but the line had remained open and busy.

The Station site is now under new private housing, despite local efforts to re-open it for passengers.

Heighington, Railway Station, Beeching, closure
Kirkstead, Woodhall Junction, Railway Station
Kirkstead, Woodhall Junction, Railway Station
Kirkstead, Woodhall Junction, Railway Station

The Lincoln to Boston line was opened in 1848 as part of the Great Northern Railway’s Lincolnshire Loop Line. What was then called Kirkstead station was renamed Woodhall Junction in 1922.

The station buildings had been extended in 1855 when it became the junction for the branch line to Horncastle.

A busy ferry here, over the River Witham, was replaced by a swing bridge in 1891 and reached by the level crossing which the Lincoln bound train in this view is about to cross. It was replaced in turn in 1968 by the bridge from which this photograph is taken.

The passenger service to Horncastle ceased in 1954 and to Lincoln in 1970. Goods trains continued to run serving the goods yards here and at Horncastle until April 1971.

The cast iron gent’s urinal from this station can be seen in the Museum of Lincolnshire Life in Lincoln.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

Kirkstead, Woodhall junction railway station
Kirton in Holland, Railway Station
Kirton in Holland, Railway Station
Kirton in Holland, Railway Station

Between Boston and Spalding, Kirton station opened in 1848 and is shown here in 1970, on the last weekend before the line closed.

On 11 September 1961 it was one of 25 rural stations in the County that lost its passenger trains, but goods trains continued to call until 1964.

The large building, centre right, was the potato warehouse built by the ‘Potato King’, William Dennis. By 1918 Dennis was farming some 12,000 acres in the County, including 2000 acres at Kirton. Potatoes were at one time a major traffic for the railway.

Everything in this view has now gone. A roundabout now occupies the site, the railway now the route of the A16 with all the land to the right of the railway redeveloped for housing.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Kirton in Holland, William Dennis, potato railway
Lincoln, Avoiding Line
Lincoln, Avoiding Line
Lincoln, Avoiding Line

This bridge, carrying the Lincoln Avoiding Line over the River Witham in the foreground and the drain beyond, behind the garages, was the City’s longest railway bridge. It was 96 metres, (315 feet), long.

The Firth Road premises of what is now Siemens can be seen through and beyond the bridge.

The Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around the City, part of the route of the Great Eastern and Great Northern Joint Railway carrying trains between East Anglia, to south Yorkshire and beyond.

This part of that route was closed in 1983 and dismantled the following year, at which time this bridge was demolished.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, avoiding line
Lincoln, Avoiding LIne
Lincoln, Avoiding LIne
Lincoln, Avoiding LIne

The Lincoln Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around the City centre to carry, principally, goods trains.

Using this through trains did not require the closure of the level crossings and trains from most directions could also access the Lincoln Holmes Yard, again avoiding level crossings.

It was closed in 1983 and the route dismantled the following year. Much of the track bed has disappeared under housing and commercial redevelopments.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, avoiding line
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Greetwell Junction
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Greetwell Junction
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, Greetwell Junction

The Lincoln Avoiding Line opened in 1882 as a railway bypass around Lincoln City centre.

At its eastern end was Greetwell Junction, the place where the new route connected with the line to Sleaford, also opened in 1882, together with a new line eastwards to link with the line to Boston, opened in 1848.

The Avoiding Line closed in 1983 and in this view the demolition train can be seen in the left background.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, Lincoln avoiding line, Greetwell Junction
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street
Lincoln, Avoiding Line, High Street

For 102 years, 1882 to 1984, the lower end of Lincoln High Street was crossed by this bridge.

It carried the Lincoln Avoiding Line at a high level around the south of the City, providing a route for trains not needing to disrupt traffic by passing over the level crossings in the City centre.

his bridge will be well remembered for the inspired advertising slogan it carried in its later years, shown in this view.

Peter Grey Archive, 1984

IA and Bridges, avoiding line, Lincoln High Street
Lincoln, High Level Crossing
Lincoln, High Level Crossing
Lincoln, High Level Crossing

Level crossings in Lincoln have been the subject of controversy in the City since 1848 when the City Council received a petition expressing concern from a number of townspeople.

Since that time they have been a controversial issue and remain so today.

Details can be found in The Railway History of Lincoln, by Ruddock and Pearson, 1974.

Over the years their number has been reduced but that over the High Street remains.

Here, in 1982, the traditional crossing gates were being replaced with lifting barriers, an improvement to reduce street closure times.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

IA and Bridges, Lincoln High Street level crossing
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse
Lincoln, Railway Warehouse

The Great Central Railway opened their new warehouse on Holmes Yard on 8 July 1907 but it became surplus to requirements after the Railway Grouping in 1923.

At that time, along with the Great Eastern and the Great Northern Railways in the City they all became part of the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER).

The LNER decided to concentrate their sack hire service to farmers at four locations, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, York and Lincoln and this became the Lincoln sack depot.

It closed in 1963, becoming for some years a builders' merchant, in which guise it is seen here.

It survives today but now as the Library of the University of Lincoln which occupies the site of the former Holmes goods yard.

Peter Grey Archive, c.1980

IA and Bridges, G C R Railway Warehouse, sack depot
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station
Lincoln, St Mark's Station

Lincolnshire’s first main railway station, originally called simply Lincoln it was renamed Lincoln St Marks in 1950.

Opened in 1846 and built by the Midland Railway the attractive architecture of the lines buildings was particularly impressive.

It became the City’s main station in 1965 when trains to London were diverted here from the City’s other station.

With major alterations to the railway layout in Lincoln in 1985 it was closed but this building has been successfully converted as part of the shopping centre here and this view is little changed.

Peter Grey Archive, 1981

IA and Bridges, St Mark's Station, Midland railway
Little Bytham, Railway Bridge
Little Bytham, Railway Bridge
Little Bytham, Railway Bridge

This is the one surviving bridge (at TF 025 176) from the short-lived Little Bytham to Edenham Light Railway, commonly know as Lord Willoughby's Private Railway.

It opened in 1856 and closed for passengers in 1871, though horse-drawn goods wagons continued to use the line until 1884.

It provided a link from the main Towns Line at Little Bytham to a terminus close to Willoughby's home at Grimsthorpe Castle.

The bridge carries the minor road from Little Bytham to Witham on the Hill.

Ken Redmore, 2011

Little Bytham, railway bridge, Lord Willoughby, Edenham,
Little Steeping, Railway Station
Little Steeping, Railway Station
Little Steeping, Railway Station

The site of Little Steeping station, between Boston and Firsby, seen here in 1970.

On 11 September 1961 it was one of 25 rural stations in the County that lost its passenger trains, but goods trains continued to call until 1964.

Trains between Boston and Skegness still pass the site but the signal box and traditional crossing gates have gone to be replaced with automatic barriers.

Note the signal box with a very pronounced backwards lean.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Little Steeping, railway station
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line

The east side of Louth had several parks which have been taken into the growing town.  One such was Stewton House Park.

The railway from Boston cut through it so that land to the west of the line was sold off for large houses and gardens and that to the east is mostly housing estate.

The railway has gone but the route is still there and converted to a pleasant tree-lined footpath.

Louth, East Coast Line, Railway, footpath
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line
Louth, Old Railway Line

This information board alongside the footpath to the south-east of the town centre gives details of the former East Lincolnshire Line which passed through Louth.

 

Louth, East Lincolnshire Railway Line, footpath
Louth, Railway Station
Louth, Railway Station
Louth, Railway Station

Opened in 1848, Louth station was on the East Lincolnshire Railway, opened in 1848.

The Tudor Gothic style with a large porte-cochère, (covered carriage entrance), over the main doorway was designed to give a sense of occasion to travelling by train. Furthermore, it was the entrance for all, not just the well to do as would be the case in the country house which its design resembled.

Passenger trains ceased in 1970 but goods trains to the malthouse alongside the station ran for another ten years.

This building has since been converted into apartments.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Louth, Railway station
Market Rasen, Railway Station
Market Rasen, Railway Station
Market Rasen, Railway Station

The fast train from Lincoln arriving at Market Rasen station in 1887 or 1888.

The locomotive in the photo is a Manchester Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway class 23, an 0-6-0.

This was shortly before interlocking block signalling was installed on this line.


Courtesy Chris Padley

Market Rasen, railway station, train,
Metheringham, Railway Control Building
Metheringham, Railway Control Building
Metheringham, Railway Control Building

Alongside Metheringham station was a small brick building with the remnants of heavy steel shutters around its windows.

It was built during World War II as an emergency railway control building.

If the control office at Lincoln station ten miles away had been knocked out by enemy bombing then the trains and traffic would have been controlled from here.

It was one of 20 such buildings in the country and was a rare survivor, having been used as a railway store for almost 70 years until it was demolished in 2011.


Stewart Squires, 2010

Metheringham, railway control,
Midville, Railway Station
Midville, Railway Station
Midville, Railway Station

 Opened with what was known as the ‘New Line’, between Coningsby Junction and Bellwater Junctions, in 1913, the line and station closed in 1970.

The route was created primarily to help speed excursionists from the Midlands to Skegness and Mablethorpe but it also served the many farms and hamlets scattered along the northern edges of the East and West Fens. Midville station was a good example of this.

Some buildings remain today but the track bed has disappeared, incorporated into the adjacent fields.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Midville, railway station
New Bolingbroke, Railway Station
New Bolingbroke, Railway Station
New Bolingbroke, Railway Station

Opened with what was known as the ‘New Line’, between Coningsby Junction and Bellwater Junctions, in 1913, the line and station closed in 1970.

The route was created primarily to help speed excursionists from the Midlands to Skegness and Mablethorpe and it was very successful at doing this. It also served some small villages en route of which New Bolingbroke was one.

Everything in this view has gone now although the very distinctive former booking office, out of view to the right, remains in a new use to mark the location.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

New Bolingbroke, railway station
Potterhanworth, Railway Station
Potterhanworth, Railway Station
Potterhanworth, Railway Station

Great Eastern and Great Northern Joint Railway carrying trains between East Anglia to south Yorkshire and beyond opened in 1882.

It was created from a mix of existing railway routes together with one new section, that from Spalding to Lincoln, also opened in 1882. Potterhanworth station was on this latter stretch.

It was built to the same architectural design as the other village stations on the new line.

The station closed to passengers in 1955 and for goods in 1964.

The line remains open but the building in this photograph has since been demolished.

Peter Grey Archive, 1971

Potterhanworth, railway station
Saxilby, Railway Signal Box
Saxilby, Railway Signal Box
Saxilby, Railway Signal Box

The signal box at Saxilby (SK 892753) was built in 1922 to replace an earlier one within the station limits.

It protects a public road to the south of the station and has a strong LNER style.

Stewart Squires, 2003

Saxilby, railway signal box,
Skellingthorpe, railway line removal
Skellingthorpe, railway line removal
Skellingthorpe, railway line removal

The Lancashire, Derbyshire and East Coast Railway was an ambitious 171 mile project to link Warrington in the west and new docks at Sutton on Sea in the east, thus giving a new outlet for Derbyshire coal.

In the event, in 1896 only the central portion, from Chesterfield to Pyewipe on the outskirts of Lincoln was built and Skellingthorpe became the line's only Lincolnshire station.

The line lost its passenger service in 1955. The route, however, was important for coal trains to Immingham and seasonal passenger trains taking people from north Nottinghamshire to the Lincolnshire seaside and remained in use until total closure in 1980.

The track, seen here near Skellingthorpe, was removed in 1981.

Peter Grey Archive, 1981

Skellingthorpe, railway line, Pyewipe,
Southrey, Railway Station
Southrey, Railway Station
Southrey, Railway Station

The Lincoln to Boston line was opened in 1848 as part of the Great Northern Railway’s Lincolnshire Loop Line.

Southrey station closed with the line in 1970 but goods trains to and from Horncastle continued to pass through until 1971.

This was one of the stations alongside the River Witham with a ferry service linking the isolated farms on Dunston Fen on the west bank with the station.

Now part of the long distance cycling and walking trail, the ‘Water Rail Way’, the platforms, concrete name boards and station master's house still survive.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Southrey, railway station
Spalding, Steppingstones Railway Footbridge
Spalding, Steppingstones Railway Footbridge
Spalding, Steppingstones Railway Footbridge

This wrought iron footbridge, with five equal spans of 50 feet, and a total length of 368 feet overall, spanned a total of 16 running lines and sidings just north of Spalding station (TF 245 231).

It was built in 1860 for GNR and demolished in 2010.

This photograph shows some of the architectural detailing, which is both functional and attractive. The spandrels, external brackets, stairway balusters, supporting columns and their caps were all finely detailed.

Spalding, Steppingstone Railway footbridge
Stickney, Railway Station
Stickney, Railway Station
Stickney, Railway Station

Stickney station opened with what was known as the ‘New Line’, between Coningsby Junction and Bellwater Junction, in 1913.

Built by the Great Northern Railway with a double track, in 1916 the GNR Board agreed to lift one line of rails to assist the war effort. This happened on several branch lines nationwide with the rails destined for use in France.

The missing track was reinstated in 1923.

This station lost its goods service in 1964, became unstaffed in 1968 and the line and station closed in 1970.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Stickney, railway station
Stixwould, Railway Station
Stixwould, Railway Station
Stixwould, Railway Station

The Lincoln to Boston line was opened in 1848 as part of the Great Northern Railway’s Lincolnshire Loop Line.

It lost its goods yard in 1963 and closed for passengers in 1970. However, goods trains to and from Horncastle passed through for another six months until April 1971.

The railway here is now part of the long distance cycle and footpath, the Water Rail Way.

The stationmaster’s house, in the background, has since been imaginatively extended and the former signal box is now linked to and part of the house.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Stixwould, railway station
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge

The third Cross Keys Bridge over the river Nene at Sutton Bridge.

This Swing Bridge was built by the Great Northern Railway in 1894-1897 at a cost of £80,000 and was initially worked by hydraulic power.

It carried both rail and road traffic until the railway closed in 1959.

The bridge still opens for river traffic heading to and from Wisbech.

Postcard, 1920

Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge, River Nene, swing bridge,
Tumby Woodside, Railway Station
Tumby Woodside, Railway Station
Tumby Woodside, Railway Station

Opened with what was known as the ‘New Line’, between Coningsby Junction and Bellwater Junctions, in 1913, the line and station closed in 1970.

Serving such a rural area it unusually became a terminus for some trains in the year before closure.

There were three trains calling here from Lincoln to Skegness with a further three, to and from Lincoln, terminating here.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Tumby Woodside, railway station
Washingborough, Ferry and Station
Washingborough, Ferry and Station
Washingborough, Ferry and Station

Washingborough Ferry over the River Witham was close by the railway station which stood on the bank.

This was the Lincoln to Boston line, now a cycle track.

Washingborough, Ferry, Witham, Lincoln to Boston railway
Washingborough, Railway Station
Washingborough, Railway Station
Washingborough, Railway Station

The Lincoln to Boston line was opened in 1848 as part of the Great Northern Railway’s Lincolnshire Loop Line.

Built alongside the River Witham, this was one of those stations on the line which had a ferry.

Seen here in 1971 the station had lost its goods and passenger services in July 1940. Despite this in this view taken 31 years later the platforms were intact.

Now part of the long distance cycling and walking trail, the ‘Water Rail Way’, the platforms, and the buildings seen here still survive.

Peter Grey Archive, 1971

Washingborough, railway station
Withcall, Railway Station, Platform Edging
Withcall, Railway Station, Platform Edging
Withcall, Railway Station, Platform Edging

In the nineteenth century the edges of railway platforms were usually made of hard blue coping bricks, as shown here at Withcall station on the Bardney to Louth line (completed 1876).

Similar bricks made by Joseph Hamblet of West Bromwich were also used in station buildings, bridges and other railway structures at many Lincolnshire lines built in this period.

For example, they are seen on the Midland and Great Northern Railway between Bourne and Little Bytham, constructed in the period 1890-93.

The platforms on this line were reconstructed some time after the GNR bought the line from the original company.

Ken Redmore, 2009

Withcall, railway station, platform edging, Joseph Hamblet,
Woodhall Spa, Railway Station
Woodhall Spa, Railway Station
Woodhall Spa, Railway Station

Woodhall Spa station was on the 7 mile line opened in 1855 between Kirkstead (later Woodhall Junction) and Horncastle. Passenger services ceased in 1954 and goods traffic in 1971.

This view looking west from the station shows the extremely acute angle of the road and railway crossing.  Cyclists often found this hazardous.

This postcard was posted in 1909.

Woodhall Spa, railway station
Woodhall Spa, Railway Station
Woodhall Spa, Railway Station
Woodhall Spa, Railway Station

Woodhall Spa was the only intermediate station on the Horncastle branch railway which opened in 1855.

This is the Broadway level crossing and, in the foreground, is the site of the passenger station.

Passenger trains stopped running on the line in 1954 and the station was demolished. Goods trains continued to use the line until final closure in 1971.

Space was very limited by the railway and the town’s only goods siding was further south, beyond a second level crossing. The siding was in use until 1964.

Peter Grey Archive, 1970

Woodhall Spa, railway station