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Infrastructure - Rivers and Canals
 
Alvingham, Canal Lock
Alvingham, Canal Lock
Alvingham, Canal Lock

The lock at Alvingham was one of eight on the Louth Navigation which linked Louth to the sea near Tetney.

The canal was designed by John Grundy, and opened in 1770, remaining in use until 1924.

This view shows the unusual concave brick sections which make up the lock wall. This design enabled the walls to resist lateral ground pressure more effectively.

Frank Robinson, 2011

See Louth Navigation, a history: Stuart Sizer

Alvingham, canal, Grundy, lock, Navigation, Louth,
Bardney, Bardney Lock
Bardney, Bardney Lock
Bardney, Bardney Lock

Bardney Lock, one mile north-west of the village centre, was built in 1865 to replace the original lock of c.1770.

It controls water levels on the Witham at the most prominent of the cuts which straightened and improved the river in the eighteenth century.

The lock has unusual curved gates, also seen at Antons Gowt and Stamp End, Lincoln.

September 2013

Bardney, Bardney Lock
Bardney, Ferry
Bardney, Ferry
Bardney, Ferry

There is known to have been a ferry over the Witham at Bardney for over 1000 years.

As shown in this Victorian photograph, there were separate ferries for passengers and vehicles; both of them chain operated.

The building of a bridge over the river 1894-96 to the north-west (left) of this scene brought the ferry services to an end.

Undated postcard

Bardney, Ferry, bridge,
Boston, Cowbridge
Boston, Cowbridge
Boston, Cowbridge

One of three matching footbridges cast at Butterley (Derbyshire) in 1811 and erected over the Maud Foster Drain (TF 329471).

It was designed by John Rennie or William Jessop.

March 2013

Boston, Cowbridge, John Rennie, William Jessop
Boston, Grand Sluice
Boston, Grand Sluice
Boston, Grand Sluice

The Witham Navigation was created in the 1760s and ended at the Grand Sluice, with the tidal haven beyond the sluice.

The Great Northern Railway crossed the river at this point and by the date of this picture the river was used for recreation rather than commerce, as these rowing boats show.

Postcard, c1912
Boston, sluice, navigation, witham,
Boston, Maud Foster Drain, Cowbridge
Boston, Maud Foster Drain, Cowbridge
Boston, Maud Foster Drain, Cowbridge
An angling competition is depicted alongside the Maud Foster Drain which is about two miles north of Boston town centre in the Edwardian period.

The road on the right-hand bank is the present B1183 to Horncastle; the public house on the extreme right is thought to be the Cowbridge House Inn.

Hundreds of anglers travelled by train from Sheffield and the Midlands for sport in both the Witham and the fenland drains at this time.

Undated postcard
Boston, angling, witham, drain,
Boston, Packhouse Quay
Boston, Packhouse Quay
Boston, Packhouse Quay

This boat is moored at Packhouse Quay which had been the heart of the port of Boston until the Dock, south of the town, was opened in the 1880s.

Some of the warehouses remain in the town centre but they have been converted to other uses.

Postcard, c1918
Boston, warehouse, quay,
Boston, Paddle Steamers
Boston, Paddle Steamers
Boston, Paddle Steamers

Even after Boston Dock was opened south of the town, paddle steamers Privateer and Boston were still moored at the old quays in the town centre and occasionally took pleasure trips into the Wash.

This paddle steamer passes the timber yard in the South End on its way downstream.

Postcard, c1908
Boston, paddle steamer,
Boston, Railway Bridge
Boston, Railway Bridge
Boston, Railway Bridge

This shows the railway bridge carrying the Great Northern Railway across the river Witham on the upstream side of the Grand Sluice at Boston.

The iron bridge designed by Richard Johnson, GNR's chief engineer, was opened on 28 May 1885 to replace the original wooden bridge of 1848.

Postcard, 1909

 

Boston, bridge, gnr, grand sluice,
Boston, River Witham
Boston, River Witham
Boston, River Witham

The River Witham north of Boston was diverted from a winding channel into this new straight cutting in the 1760s.

Behind the barge in this view is the railway bridge and beyond it, the Grand Sluice which separated the inland river from the tidal haven.

Postcard, 1911

Boston, witham, grand sluice,
Boston, Warehouses
Boston, Warehouses
Boston, Warehouses

Three warehouses, dating from the late 18th and early 19th centuries, front the river Witham close to the centre of Boston.

On the extreme right is Packhouse Quay, a building converted by the County Council into the Sam Newsum Music Centre in 1978.

Ken Redmore, 2008
Boston, warehouse,
Caistor Canal, 01. Entrance from Ancholme
Caistor Canal, 01. Entrance from Ancholme
Caistor Canal, 01. Entrance from Ancholme

Looking north, the New River Ancholme is shown in the background and Caistor Canal in the foreground.

The River Ancholme, which runs north from Bishopbridge near Market Rasen through Brigg to the Humber, was made navigable by a series of improvements from the 17th to the 19th centuries.

It provided an essential link for Caistor Canal.

Christopher Padley, 1965

Caistor Canal, river Ancholme,
Caistor Canal, 02. Entrance from River Ancholme
Caistor Canal, 02. Entrance from River Ancholme
Caistor Canal, 02. Entrance from River Ancholme

The footbridge at the end of the canal (shown in the other, 1960s photograph) has been removed, though the well-constructed stone abutments remain.

Caistor Canal, Entrance
Caistor Canal, 03. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 03. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 03. Beck End Lock

This view of the first lock on the canal looks upstream from the footbridge over the entrance from the Ancholme.

Chris Padley, 1965

Caistor Canal, Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 04. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 04. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 04. Beck End Lock

The first of six locks on the canal, looking east.

The small accommodation bridge it a relatively recent construction.

 

Caistor Canal, Beck End lock,
Caistor Canal, 05. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 05. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 05. Beck End Lock

This view of the first lock on the canal is from the upstream (east) end.

In common with the other five surviving locks on the canal, much of the original 18th century stonework of the lock walls remains in good condition.

The canal now provides drainage for an area of land between Moortown and the Ancholme.

Caistor Canal, Beck End lock,
Caistor Canal, 06. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 06. Beck End Lock
Caistor Canal, 06. Beck End Lock

Good quality Derbyshire stone was used for constructing the locks.

Built in the 1790s and with no significant maintenance since the canal's closure in the 1870s, it is in remarkably good condition.

Caistor Canal, Beck End lock,
Caistor Canal, 07. Ings Lock
Caistor Canal, 07. Ings Lock
Caistor Canal, 07. Ings Lock

Ings Lock is the second lock from the Ancholme, about 2 km (1.2 miles) from the river.

A sizeable tree on the north bank has severly damaged the lock wall on that side.

Caistor Canal, Ings Lock,
Caistor Canal, 08. near Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 08. near Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 08. near Willow Lock

Caistor Canal, opened in 1795 and closed in the 1880s, ran due east from the river Ancholme to Moortown, a distance of 4 miles.

The canal stopped 3 miles short of Caistor, before the steep rise in the Wolds escarpment. It was entirely within the parish of South Kelsey.

In 1848 a station was built on the Lincoln to Grimsby railway at Moortown half-a-mile nearer Caistor than the canal-head, and this was a major factor in the decline of the canal.

Caistor Canal, willow lock,
Caistor Canal, 09. Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 09. Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 09. Willow Lock

Willow Lock is about half-a-mile west of South Kelsey.

The fine state of the stonework is well illustrated in this photograph.  The irregular courses introduced into some of the stonework are evident in the right foreground.

Caistor Canal, willow lock,
Caistor Canal, 10. Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 10. Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 10. Willow Lock

This photograph at the upstream end of Willow Lock shows both the simple fixed weir introduced in the twentieth century.

To the left in the lock wall at water level is the entrance to the by-pass channel, controlled by paddles.

When the paddle was opened water from the upstream side of the lock gates entered the lock to lift a vessel progressing towards Moortown.

Caistor Canal,
Caistor Canal, 11. Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 11. Willow Lock
Caistor Canal, 11. Willow Lock

This is the entrance to the by-pass channel on the upstream end of the lock.

Caistor Canal, Willow Lock, by-pass channel
Caistor Canal, 12. Willow Lock, Gate fitting
Caistor Canal, 12. Willow Lock, Gate fitting
Caistor Canal, 12. Willow Lock, Gate fitting

The embedded gate hinge fitting for Willow Lock has typical a design typical of the late-eighteenth century.

Caistor Canal, Willow Lock, gate hinge
Caistor Canal, 13. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 13. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 13. Mill Lock

This photograph, taken in the mid-1960s, shows Mill Lock in a relatively clean condition.

The accomodation bridge was erected by the landowner after the closure of the canal.

Caistor Canal, mill lock,
Caistor Canal, 14. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 14. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 14. Mill Lock

General view of Mill Lock looking east.

Caistor Canal, mill lock,
Caistor Canal, 15. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 15. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 15. Mill Lock

Mill Lock, probably more than the others, has been extensively repaired with brick and re-used stone.

A watermill (shown in photograph 17.) stood close to the lock side on the left of the picture.

The mill wheel was positioned in the former lock chamber.

When the mill was demolished in the early twentieth century the lock wall was reconstructed.

Caistor Canal, mill lock,
Caistor Canal, 16. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 16. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 16. Mill Lock

Another photograph of the south wall of the lock chamber at Mill Lock.

The mill dam was just to the left of the photograph.

The repair work undertaken to the wall after the demolition of the watermill can be seen to the left of the picture.

Caistor Canal, mill lock,
Caistor Canal, 17. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 17. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 17. Mill Lock

This iron-framed entrance to the by-pass channel at Mill Lock has survived in good condition.

Caistor Canal, mill lock, by-pass channel
Caistor Canal, 18. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 18. Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 18. Mill Lock
The upstream entrance to Mill Lock was rebuilt in brick on the south side following the demolition of the watermill.
Caistor Canal, Mill Lock
Caistor Canal, 19. Mill Lock Watermill
Caistor Canal, 19. Mill Lock Watermill
Caistor Canal, 19. Mill Lock Watermill

Mill Lock was converted to act as the wheel pit for a new watermill built some time before 1872, i.e. when the canal was reaching the end of its active use.

It was demolished around the time of the First World War.

The mill dam was built in the place of the upper lock gates.

Lincolnshire Mills Group, Unknown date

Caistor Canal, mill lock, water mill
Caistor Canal, 20. Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 20. Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 20. Moor Lock

Moor Lock, between South Kelsey and Moortown, is the fifth lock from the Ancholme and the highest one which survives.

Tree growth has badly damaged the north wall of this lock.

Caistor Canal, Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 21. Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 21. Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 21. Moor Lock

This photograph illustrates the contemporary function of the canal as a drainage channel.

A weir has been inserted in the place of the upper lock gates.

Caistor Canal, Moor Lock, drainage
Caistor Canal, 22. Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 22. Moor Lock
Caistor Canal, 22. Moor Lock

The original toolwork on the Derbyshire stone used for the lock walls is clear at Moor Lock.

Caistor Canal, Moor Lock,, stonework
Caistor Canal, 23. Moortown stonework
Caistor Canal, 23. Moortown stonework
Caistor Canal, 23. Moortown stonework

The sixth and final lock on the canal was at Moortown.

No elements of the lock's structure remain, though, until recently, a depression in the land indicated its position.

Shaped stone blocks, almost certainly from the former lock, have been reassembled to create a wall nearby.

Caistor Canal,
Caistor Canal, 24. Moortown Warehouse
Caistor Canal, 24. Moortown Warehouse
Caistor Canal, 24. Moortown Warehouse

The upper terminus of Caistor Canal was at Moortown, about 3 miles short of the town.

A number of merchants set up business at Moortown, although it remained a very small community which owed its existence entirely to the canal.

This fine warehouse of the 1790s has been converted for residential use.

Caistor Canal, moortown, warehouse,
Caistor Canal, 25. Moortown Warehouse
Caistor Canal, 25. Moortown Warehouse
Caistor Canal, 25. Moortown Warehouse

Side elevation of the late-eighteenth century warehouse at Moortown, the only permanent reminder of the canal basin here at the head of Caistor Canal.

Caistor Canal, moortown, warehouse,
Deeping St James, Deeping Gate Bridge
Deeping St James, Deeping Gate Bridge
Deeping St James, Deeping Gate Bridge

The Stamford Canal was constructed in the late seventeenth century to provide a navigable waterway to Deeping St James and thence by existing main drains to Boston and the sea.

Some sections of its course, as here, alongside the main street (B1525) in Deeping St James, were created by making the parallel River Welland navigable; elsewhere a separate channel was dug.

This fine stone pack horse bridge, which straddles the Welland/canal dates from 1651.

Deeping St James, Stamford Canal, Deeping Gate Bridge, River Welland
Gainsborough, Packet Wharf
Gainsborough, Packet Wharf
Gainsborough, Packet Wharf

The packet wharf on the Trent at Gainsborough.

From the Album of Gainsboro’ Views published by Amcoats & Co, Booksellers, Stationers & Printers, Lord Street, Gainsborough, c.1900?

 

Gainsborough, packet wharf
Grantham, Canal
Grantham, Canal
Grantham, Canal

The Grantham Canal runs for 33 miles from Grantham to the River Trent at West Bridgford.

It opened in 1797 and closed in 1936.

The Grantham Canal Society has been working to restore it.

The exact location of this undated postcard is uncertain.

Grantham, canal, Trent, West Bridgford
Holdingham, Lock
Holdingham, Lock
Holdingham, Lock

This lock was built when the New River Slea was made navigable in 1794, linking Sleaford to the Witham at Chapel Hill.

Holdingham Lock is built of brick with iron reinforcing bands and stone cappings.

A channel of the river drives Holdingham Mill, seen to the left.

October 2011

Holdingham, lock, Sleaford canal navigation
Horkstow, Suspension Bridge
Horkstow, Suspension Bridge
Horkstow, Suspension Bridge

Horkstow bridge (TA 973190), a notable example of a suspension bridge, was built by Sir John Rennie as part of the improvements to the Ancholme Navigation in 1834-5.

It has a simple plank deck and a span of 130ft.

Horkstow is one of the earliest unaltered suspension bridges in the country, providing access for farm traffic.

Frank Robinson, 2008

Horkstow, suspension bridge, John Rennie, Ancholme, Navigation,
Horncastle, Canal Warehouses
Horncastle, Canal Warehouses
Horncastle, Canal Warehouses

Both rivers in the town – the Bain and the Waring – supplied water for industry and were also canalised for use by boats of shallow draft.

Industries grew up along the banks of both rivers (canal basins) and there were several warehouses, such as these at off West Street, for wool, grain, timber and leather.

Horncastle, canal warehouses
Horncastle, River Waring
Horncastle, River Waring
Horncastle, River Waring

The River Waring rises a few miles to the north-east in Fulletby parish.

It was canalised along this stretch to form a limb of the Horncastle-Tattershall canal, known as the South Basin.

On the left-hand side (north) is Wharf Road, once the location of several warehouses and other businesses using water transport for the movement of goods.

Postcard, 1911

Horncastle, River Waring, Wharf Road, Horncastle Canal,
Horncastle, Staunch
Horncastle, Staunch
Horncastle, Staunch

A key element of water control for drainage and navigation in Horncastle is the staunch (or stanch) at the confluence of rivers Bain and Waring and the beginning of the Horncastle-Tattershall Canal.

Installed in 1802 when the canal opened, it maintained the water level in both of the town’s canal basins and released excess water down the Bain at times of flood.

The staunch keeper's cottage can be seen to the right.

1914

Horncastle, staunch, stanch
Horncastle, The Staunch
Horncastle, The Staunch
Horncastle, The Staunch

Water level in the town’s two rivers is controlled at the staunch – or, as it was known locally, stanch.

It is situated off Coronation Walk close to the confluence of rivers Bain and Waring and at the beginning of the Horncastle to Tattershall Canal.

At a time of potential flood in the town water is discharged through the staunch into the original bed of the Bain. A modern sluice has replaced the staunch shown here.

Ken Redmore, 1957

Horncastle, staunch, stanch
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge

The steel bow girder bridge over the Witham at Langrick was built in 1908 at the joint expense of the Great Northern Railway (which controlled the Witham navigation) and the two county councils - Holland and Lindsey - linked by the bridge.

It replaced a long established ferry between Brothertoft and Langrick.

Ken Redmore, 2003

Langrick, bridge, river Witham, steel bow girder, GNR,
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge

The steel road bridge, which cost £8490 to construct, carries some attractive wrought iron decoration, incorporating the shields of the two county councils either side of the River Witham (Lindsey and Holland).

The total length of the bridge is 174ft (53.4m) with a centre span of 120ft (36.6m).

Ken Redmore, 2003

Langrick, bridge, steel bow girder, Holland County Council, Lindsey,
Lincoln, Brayford
Lincoln, Brayford
Lincoln, Brayford

A watercolour painting of the Brayford at Lincoln by Countess Manvers (born Marie-Louise Roosevelt Butterfield), 1889-1984.

Lady Manvers trained in Paris and over her long life painted many scenes around the East Midlands, especially of her home at Thoresby Hall, Nottinghamshire.

The Pierrepont collection of her work (c600 paintings) is held at Thoresby.

Lincoln Brayford, Lady Countess Manvers, Thoresby Hall, Pierrepont,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

This modern painting of High Bridge, viewed from the west, clearly shows the twentieth century restoration work.

Lincoln High Bridge,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

The High Bridge at Lincoln, is seen in this 1950s photograph from a viewpoint in Waterside to the east.

At this time much of the north-south traffic passed along the High Street, over the High Bridge and under the Stonebow.

The obelisk which once stood on the east side of the bridge had been demolished before this date.

Postcard, c1955

Lincoln High Bridge,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

The High Bridge at Lincoln, viewed here from the west, is the only bridge in the country with secular medieval buildings.

It dates from the mid-twelfth century and was extended later in the middle ages; there was a major restoration of the timber-framed buildings in 1902 shortly after this photograph was taken.

The river Witham under the bridge was deepened and made navigable in the 1790s.

Postcard, c1900

Lincoln High Bridge, medieval building,
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge

Much of the workers' housing for the major engineering companies of Clayton and Shuttleworth and Ruston, Proctor was on the north side of the Witham, whereas the factories were on Waterside South.

Consequently this footbridge, midway between the Magpie road bridge (on Broadgate) and Stamp End Lock, had remarkably heavy use.

Ken Redmore

Lincoln, Montague Street bridge, Clayton & Shuttleworth, Ruston Proctor,
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge
Lincoln, Montague Street Bridge

Plaque on the Montague Street Bridge, which was built by J T B Porter & Co at their Gowt's Bridge Foundry off the lower High Street in Lincoln.

The firm specialised in gas works installation, but they also made a wide range of castings for bridges and street furniture.

Ken Redmore, 2011

Lincoln, Montague Street bridge, Porter, Gowts Bridge,
Lincoln, River Witham at Stamp End Lock
Lincoln, River Witham at Stamp End Lock
Lincoln, River Witham at Stamp End Lock

This lithographic print dated 1837 just predates the rapid industrialisation of Lincoln in the mid-19th century.

The view across the Witham shows Stamp End Lock in the foreground.

Clayton and Shuttleworth established their foundry and engineering works next to the Witham beyond the lock in the 1840s.

Behind the barge on the right are the smoking kilns (or clamps?) of John Gourley's brickyard.

S T Davies, 1837

Lincoln, river Witham, Stamp End Lock, Clayton & Shuttleworth, Gourley, brick kilns,
Market Deeping, Stamford Canal
Market Deeping, Stamford Canal
Market Deeping, Stamford Canal

This section of the Stamford Canal to the west of Market Deeping (TF 125098) runs close to the A16 with the River Welland in a parallel channel to the south.

Molcey's Mill, in the background of the photograph, was powered by the Welland and could take advantage of the canal for transporting materials to and from the mill.


Ken Redmore, 2010

Market Deeping, canal, Stamford, watermill, Molcey,
Midville, Hobhole Drain
Midville, Hobhole Drain
Midville, Hobhole Drain

The Hobhole Drain is the major drain of the East Fen. It runs north-south from Toynton All Saints to the Haven (Witham) 3 miles south-east of Boston.

The communities of Midville, Eastville and New Leake developed after drainage and the creation of the Hobhole Drain in the early years of the nineteenth century.

Postcard, 1930s

Midville, Hobhole Drain
Saxilby, Foss Dyke
Saxilby, Foss Dyke
Saxilby, Foss Dyke

Saxilby is the only settlement of any size on the 10-mile long Foss Dyke canal between Torksey Lock on the Trent and Brayford Pool in Lincoln.

Throughout Saxilby's past industry and trade was focused here; now it is a popular mooring spot for leisure craft.

Rod Callow, 2009

Saxilby, foss dyke, canal,
Sleaford, River Slea
Sleaford, River Slea
Sleaford, River Slea

A view of the navigable River Slea a short distance to the east of Sleaford town centre.

Houses in Eastgate are seen to the left; the popular walk along the river bank leads to Cogglesford Mill and the first lock on the Navigation below Sleaford.

Undated postcard

Sleaford, river Slea, navigation,
Sleaford, River Slea
Sleaford, River Slea
Sleaford, River Slea

This small steel footbridge over the Slea was completed in 2010, shortly before this photograph was taken.

The terminus of the former navigation is 200 metres to the left and The National Centre for Design is close by.

Ken Redmore 2010

Sleaford, navigation, footbridge
Spalding, River Welland
Spalding, River Welland
Spalding, River Welland

Spalding was a busy river port on the River Welland from Roman times until its decline in the early twentieth century.

undated postcard

Spalding, River Welland
Sutton Bridge, Port
Sutton Bridge, Port
Sutton Bridge, Port

The modern port of Sutton Bridge, opened in 1987, is situated on the west bank of the river Nene, close to the entrance to the former dock (indicated by the V-shape in the line of the river bank at the top of the photograph).

This is now a busy sea terminal importing goods from Europe and despatching them by lorry along the adjacent A17.

Sutton Bridge, port, river Nene,
Tattershall, Bridge over the River Witham
Tattershall, Bridge over the River Witham
Tattershall, Bridge over the River Witham

John Rennie built this fine red brick bridge at Tattershall over the Witham in 1815 to replace an earlier bridge of c1795 which had collapsed when the river was being dredged.

Stone copings and iron railings were provided in 1920 but removed in 1977.

A new road bridge was built alongside in 1991/92.

Ken Redmore, 2003

Tattershall, Tattershall Bridge, Witham, John Rennie,
Uffington, Stamford Canal Bridge
Uffington, Stamford Canal Bridge
Uffington, Stamford Canal Bridge

Stamford Canal runs parallel to the river Welland between Stamford and Deeping St James, in places as a separate channel and elsewhere as a stretch of the river made navigable.

As the canal crosses Uffington Park, 1.5 miles east of Stamford, the bed of the former canal is completely dry, though its route can still be clearly seen across the pasture land.

This small bridge once carried farm and other estate traffic across the canal.

Ken Redmore 2010

Uffington, Stamford Canal, Bridge,
Washingborough, Ferry and Station
Washingborough, Ferry and Station
Washingborough, Ferry and Station

Washingborough Ferry over the River Witham was close by the railway station which stood on the bank.

This was the Lincoln to Boston line, now a cycle track.

Washingborough, Ferry, Witham, Lincoln to Boston railway
West Deeping, Stamford Canal Lock
West Deeping, Stamford Canal Lock
West Deeping, Stamford Canal Lock

The Stamford Canal passed through West Deeping a few yards north of the church and close by West Deeping Mill (fed by a branch of the river Welland).

Here, on what is now private property, are several surviving elements of a lock.

Stone was used to support the gates at either end but the sides of the lock were earthen banks.

Ken Redmore, 2010

West Deeping, Stamford Canal, lock, Welland,