Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Infrastructure - Roads and Bridges
 
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge
Barton upon Humber, Humber Bridge

The Humber Bridge was opened to traffic on the 24th of June 1981 after an eight year-long building period.

It measures 1410m between the towers and the overall length between the cable anchorages is 2220m.

The cables comprise 71000 km of 5mm dia wire spun back and forth between the anchorages.

The consulting engineers were Freeman Fox and Partners.

Chris Lester 2012 

Barton Upon Humber, suspension, bridge,
Billinghay, New Bridge
Billinghay, New Bridge
Billinghay, New Bridge

Billinghay is a large village in the Witham fen between Lincoln, Horncastle, Sleaford and Boston. The Roman Car Dyke passes through the parish.

The major land drain in the area, the Billinghay Skirth, runs to the east of the village and up to the Witham near Tattershall Bridge.

The New Bridge crosses this drain to give access from the village to the A153, the former Horncastle to Sleaford turnpike road.

The tall chimney in the centre background is thought to be at the Billinghay North and Walcot Dales Pumping Station (TF 177559). The pump was operated by steam engine from 1864 to 1940.

undated postcard (by B. Smith of Heckington)

Billinghay, Billinghay Skirth, New Bridge, Car Dyke, B Smith of Heckington, Walcot Dales pumping sta
Bishop Norton, Footbridge
Bishop Norton, Footbridge
Bishop Norton, Footbridge

This small footbridge is at the bottom of the hill on the road from Bishop Norton to Atterby.

It is a single span bridge, usually described as a clapper bridge, over Atterby Beck and gives access to the fields to Atterby.

The huge stone slab is suitable for use by single line of walkers.

It is considered to be ancient and is listed by English Heritage.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Bishop Norton, footbridge,
Boston, Hospital Bridge
Boston, Hospital Bridge
Boston, Hospital Bridge

When the Maud Foster Drain was widened by John Rennie in 1811 three matching cast-iron footbridges were cast at Butterley (Derbyshire) and erected in Boston.

They are thought to have been designed either by Rennie himself or William Jessop, another eminent drainage engineer.

The Hospital Bridge shown here, close to the Maud Foster windmill, is one of the two bridges that remain (the other is at Cowbridge).

Ken Redmore, 2008

 

Boston, bridge, rennie, butterley, maude foster drain,
Boston, New Town Bridge
Boston, New Town Bridge
Boston, New Town Bridge

This view shows the road crossing Boston's new Town Bridge erected in 1913 to the design of John J Webster.

The old bridge on this site was demolished in 1913 and the new one opened on 18 July.

The building in the background is the Assembly Rooms built in 1819-22.

Postcard, 1914

Boston, bridge, assembly rooms,
Boston, Old Town Bridge
Boston, Old Town Bridge
Boston, Old Town Bridge

This view is looking from High Street in Boston across the Town Bridge into the Market Place.

The bridge shown here was designed by John Rennie, built in 1803-07 and demolished in April 1913.

Controversially, Boston Corporation tried to charge tolls on the bridge until they lost a court case in 1830.

Postcard, 1911
Boston, bridge, rennie,
Branston, Finger Post
Branston, Finger Post
Branston, Finger Post

A very fine 1930s cast iron finger post, now fully restored, is shown here.

The roundel on top gives the location (Branston Mere) and the local authority (K.C.C. = Kesteven County Council).

The post is 0.5 mile east of Waddington Airfield on the B1178.

Chris Lester, 2001
Branston, sign, finger, post,
Cleethorpes, charabanc
Cleethorpes, charabanc
Cleethorpes, charabanc

This charabanc ran from the Lincoln Arms in Cleethorpes to Hainton Street in Grimsby.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, charabanc
Cleethorpes, omnibus
Cleethorpes, omnibus
Cleethorpes, omnibus

 The Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway omnibuses travelled between Grimsby Station and Cleethorpes eight times each way daily in 1852.

postcard

Cleethorpes, omnibus, MSLR
Freiston, bridge
Freiston, bridge
Freiston, bridge

This brick bridge c.1805 is one of several crossing the Hobhole Drain, the main drain in the East Fen. It was designed by Sir John Rennie.

Frank Robinson, July 2014

Freiston, bridge, Sir John Rennie, Hobhole Drain
Gainsborough, Trent Bridge
Gainsborough, Trent Bridge
Gainsborough, Trent Bridge

This fine three-span ashlar masonry bridge was designed by William Weston in 1790.

The stone balustrades shown here were replaced by steel railings when cantilevered footpaths were added in 1964.

It was freed from tolls in 1932.

1930s photograph

Gainsborough, Trent Bridge, William Weston, tolls
Holbeach, Milestone
Holbeach, Milestone
Holbeach, Milestone

An unusual survival of the turnpike period is this eighteenth century milestone outside the parish church in High Street, Holbeach.

Ken Redmore, 2010

Holbeach, milestone,
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge

The steel bow girder bridge over the Witham at Langrick was built in 1908 at the joint expense of the Great Northern Railway (which controlled the Witham navigation) and the two county councils - Holland and Lindsey - linked by the bridge.

It replaced a long established ferry between Brothertoft and Langrick.

Ken Redmore, 2003

Langrick, bridge, river Witham, steel bow girder, GNR,
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge
Langrick, Bridge

The steel road bridge, which cost £8490 to construct, carries some attractive wrought iron decoration, incorporating the shields of the two county councils either side of the River Witham (Lindsey and Holland).

The total length of the bridge is 174ft (53.4m) with a centre span of 120ft (36.6m).

Ken Redmore, 2003

Langrick, bridge, steel bow girder, Holland County Council, Lindsey,
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge
Lincoln, High Bridge

The High Bridge at Lincoln, is seen in this 1950s photograph from a viewpoint in Waterside to the east.

At this time much of the north-south traffic passed along the High Street, over the High Bridge and under the Stonebow.

The obelisk which once stood on the east side of the bridge had been demolished before this date.

Postcard, c1955

Lincoln High Bridge,
Lincoln, Holmes Road, Lifting Bridge
Lincoln, Holmes Road, Lifting Bridge
Lincoln, Holmes Road, Lifting Bridge

At the western end of the Brayford where the Fossdyke begins this lifting bridge gave access from Carholme Road via Holmes Road to the Holmes Yard railway goods depot.

The roof of the depot is seen at the top left of the picture; immediately below is the bridge operator's cabin.

This bridge frequently caused traffic delays in the Brayford area.

It is now the location of the high level road bridge completed a few years ago.

The University of Lincoln occupies the site of the goods depot.

Doris Longbottom, c1970

Lincoln, Brayford, Holmes Road, lifting bridge,
Lincoln, Newport Roman Arch
Lincoln, Newport Roman Arch
Lincoln, Newport Roman Arch

Newport Arch is the surviving portion of the north gate to the Colonia (one of four gates centrally placed in the walls of the rectangular settlement).

The central roadway arch is 16 feet (5 metres) wide and the arch providing the footpath alongside side is 7 feet (2m) wide.

The present ground level is approximately eight feet which is (2.4m), higher than in the Roman period.

Postcard from painting by Arthur C Payne

Lincoln Newport Arch, Roman,
Lincoln, Newport Roman Arch
Lincoln, Newport Roman Arch
Lincoln, Newport Roman Arch

Newport Arch is the surviving portion of the north gate to the Colonia (one of four gates centrally placed in the walls of the rectangular settlement).

The central roadway arch is 16 feet (5 metres) wide and the arch providing the footpath alongside side is 7 feet (2m) wide.

The present ground level is approximately eight feet which is (2.4m), higher than in the Roman period.

Postcard, 1906

Lincoln, Newport Arch, Roman,
Little Bytham, Railway Bridge
Little Bytham, Railway Bridge
Little Bytham, Railway Bridge

This is the one surviving bridge (at TF 025 176) from the short-lived Little Bytham to Edenham Light Railway, commonly know as Lord Willoughby's Private Railway.

It opened in 1856 and closed for passengers in 1871, though horse-drawn goods wagons continued to use the line until 1884.

It provided a link from the main Towns Line at Little Bytham to a terminus close to Willoughby's home at Grimsthorpe Castle.

The bridge carries the minor road from Little Bytham to Witham on the Hill.

Ken Redmore, 2011

Little Bytham, railway bridge, Lord Willoughby, Edenham,
Louth, Toll Cottage
Louth, Toll Cottage
Louth, Toll Cottage

The route across the Wolds from Louth to Horncastle became a turnpike following the Louth Turnpike Act of 1770.

This early 19th century toll cottage is about 1 mile SW of the centre of Louth and stands at the corner of Horncastle Road and Halfpenny Lane (TF 319860).

Frank Robinson, 2010

Louth, toll cottage house, Halfpenny Lane,
Market Rasen, Turnpike Milestone
Market Rasen, Turnpike Milestone
Market Rasen, Turnpike Milestone

There are several former turnpike milestones in Lincolnshire.

All made of stone and rather crudely lettered - along the A631 near Market Rasen (TF 117888, TF 134885, TF 149885, TF 165883, TF 181887).

This road was the former Louth-Bawtry turnpike, set up in 1765.

Ken Redmore, 2004

Market Rasen, milestone, turnpike, A631,
Newton on Trent, Dunham Bridge
Newton on Trent, Dunham Bridge
Newton on Trent, Dunham Bridge

This is the original toll bridge of 1832 built over the Trent at Dunham linking Lincolnshire and Nottinghamshire.  It is of bowstring type, designed by George Leather.

The bridge was replaced by a modern concrete structure in 1979, but it remains in local ownership.

Photograph 1978

Newton on Trent, Dunham Bridge, George Leather
Scredington, Packhorse Bridge
Scredington, Packhorse Bridge
Scredington, Packhorse Bridge

The two-arched packhorse bridge at Scredington (TF 097409), constructed in c1250, now carries a footpath over a village stream.

Close by are the remains of a moat and the extensive site of a medieval manor.


Stewart Squires, 2004

Scredington, pack horse bridge, moat,
Spital in the Street, Coaching Inn
Spital in the Street, Coaching Inn
Spital in the Street, Coaching Inn

A large coaching inn (SK 967900) was built of stone in Spital on the Street a few hundred yards north of Caenby Corner on Ermine Street (present A15) in the 18th century.

It provided accommodation for travellers and stabling for horses using this main north-south turnpike from Lincoln to the Humber.

In later years it became the simple (though rather large) farmhouse for the Home Farm.


Bill head, 1837

Spital In The Street, Coaching Inn, turnpike,
Stamford, Toll Bar
Stamford, Toll Bar
Stamford, Toll Bar

A Turnpike Trust was formed in 1762 for the road between Deeping and Morcott in Rutland.

The Newstead Toll Bar stood on what is now the A16 between Stamford and Uffington.

undated postcard

Stamford, turnpike toll bar, Newstead
Stamford, Town Bridge
Stamford, Town Bridge
Stamford, Town Bridge

The Town Bridge across the Welland which links the town to St Martin (to the right), once in Northamptonshire.

postcard 1925

Stamford, Town Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge

The third Cross Keys Bridge over the river Nene at Sutton Bridge.

This Swing Bridge was built by the Great Northern Railway in 1894-1897 at a cost of £80,000 and was initially worked by hydraulic power.

It carried both rail and road traffic until the railway closed in 1959.

The bridge still opens for river traffic heading to and from Wisbech.

Postcard, 1920

Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge, River Nene, swing bridge,
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge
Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys Bridge

Construction on this swing bridge began in 1894 and it opened for traffic on 25 July 1897. The engineer was J. Allen McDonald, engineer to the Midland Railway.

It was made and erected by A. Handyside & Co. Ltd of Derby & London, with hydraulic power by Sir W. C. Armstrong, Whitworth & Co. Ltd of Newcastle on Tyne.

Postcard posted 1915

Sutton Bridge, Cross Keys swing bridge
Tattershall, Bridge over the River Witham
Tattershall, Bridge over the River Witham
Tattershall, Bridge over the River Witham

John Rennie built this fine red brick bridge at Tattershall over the Witham in 1815 to replace an earlier bridge of c1795 which had collapsed when the river was being dredged.

Stone copings and iron railings were provided in 1920 but removed in 1977.

A new road bridge was built alongside in 1991/92.

Ken Redmore, 2003

Tattershall, Tattershall Bridge, Witham, John Rennie,
Uffington, Parish Boundary Marker
Uffington, Parish Boundary Marker
Uffington, Parish Boundary Marker

This cast-iron boundary post is alongside the A16 about one mile west of Stamford town centre (TF 046078).

It marks the boundary between Uffington and St George's parish, Stamford.

It is one of the four nineteenth century parishes in the town.

Ken Redmore, 2010

Uffington, boundary post, cast iron, Stamford, St George,
West Rasen, Packhorse Bridge
West Rasen, Packhorse Bridge
West Rasen, Packhorse Bridge

This packhorse bridge is about 20 metres long and crosses the River Rase in West Rasen, about 3 miles west of Market Rasen (TF 063893).

It is said to have been built in the early 1300s by the then Bishop of Lincoln, who also built a bridge over the Ancholme, two miles away at the place now known as Bishopbridge.

Pevsner, however, dates the bridge to the 15th century.

F Robinson, 2010

West Rasen, packhorse bridge, Bishopbridge
Wold Newton, milestone
Wold Newton, milestone
Wold Newton, milestone

The Grimsby to Wold Newton turnpike act was passed in 1765.

This iron milestone still stands at the roadside, 2 furlongs north of the village of Wold Newton.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

Wold Newton, milestone