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Settlement - Other Dwellings
 
Boston, 120 High Street
Boston, 120 High Street
Boston, 120 High Street

This house, dating from the late eighteenth century, is considered by Pevsner to be the best house in the street.

It has five bays, with a pediment over the centre bays which contains a Rococo cartouche and long garland of flowers.

March 2013

Boston, 120 High Street
Boston, 128 High Street
Boston, 128 High Street
Boston, 128 High Street

Numbers 124-136 form an unusual eighteenth century terrace of three storeys and eighteen bays divided by giant pilasters.

This photograph shows one of the original doorways.

March 2013

Boston, 128 High Street
Boston, 35 High Street
Boston, 35 High Street
Boston, 35 High Street

Structural timbers in the gable end of 35 High Street indicate its medieval origins.

It is one of several timber-framed houses of this period along this stretch of High Street.

March 2013

Boston, 35 High Street, timber framed building
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House

Fydell House was bought by Richard Fydell in 1733, and was owned by members of the family in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Seen here is a rear view across the formal gardens. The armillary sphere in the foreground is part of a tribute to Joseph Banks – a frequent visitor to the house.

Frank Robinson, September 2014

Boston, Fydell House, Joseph Banks, Robert Fydell
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House
Boston, Fydell House

Fydell House is thought to have been built in 1702-03 to a design by architect William Sands, who was responsible for the garden of Ayscoughfee Hall in Spalding.

The Jackson family were the original owners of the house and it was probably built for Mrs Lennox Jackson, who was then an elderly widow living with her family.

In 1733, Richard Fydell (1710-80), a worker in the wine trade, bought the house from Richard Browne. Richard went on to build a very successful business, which his son Thomas (1740-1812) continued.

Richard and Thomas between them were mayors of Boston six times. They also represented Boston in five parliaments. Thomas’s own son, Thomas Junior (1773 – 1814) also represented Boston at parliament.

1975 image

Boston, Fydell House, William Sands, Lennox Jackson, Richard Browne
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall
Boston, Shodfriars Hall

The half-timbered building shown here is the front part of Shodfriars' Hall (designed by brothers G G Scott junior and J O Scott) in South Street, Boston.

It was built in 1874 and includes timber framing of a smaller earlier building on the site.

Behind this front part is a red brick club-room with storage below.

Postcard, 1913
Boston, hall, scott,
Bourne, Red Hall
Bourne, Red Hall
Bourne, Red Hall

Red Hall, of c1600, was used as a passenger station and station master's house from the arrival of the railway in Bourne in 1861 until it closed in 1959 (although a goods branch remained until 1965).

From the grounds a glimpse can be had of the goods warehouse.

Bourne, railway, station, Red Hall,
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall

Teapot Hall, Dalderby (TF 252 665) is a much-quoted example of a very simple cruck-framed cottage structure.

However, as M W Barley points out, its sloping walls would have denied headroom and are uncharacteristic of a cruck-framed cottage.

He concludes that it was not a genuine survival of a primitive tradition but was most likely built in the nineteenth century.

Unfortunately it was burned down in 1945 to celebrate VJ Day!

J D Wheeldon

Dalderby, cruck-framed cottage,
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall

A pre-war photograph of this unique building.

Tiles cover the sloping side walls below the low thatched roof.

The front wall appears to be constructed in traditional mud and stud.

Dalderby,
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall
Dalderby, Teapot Hall

View from the south-east of this well known Lincolnshire curiosity.

Pre-World War newspaper photograph

Dalderby, Tea Pot Hall
Epworth, The Old Rectory
Epworth, The Old Rectory
Epworth, The Old Rectory

The Old Rectory is John and Charles Wesley's home. It was built in 1709 after the previous building was destroyed by fire.

postcard published by Barnes & Breeze of Epworth, undated

Epworth, Old Rectory, Barnes & Breeze
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, Church End, Vicarage Cottages

These two cottages are at the western end of the church yard. The main southern gate into the church yard is on the right.

The cottage nearest to the viewer is still extant (Vicarage Cottage) and has the date 1797 carved above the door.

The barely-visible thatched cottage behind it has been demolished (see separate image).

Postcard: date stamp 1925

Friskney, Vicarage Cottages
Friskney, The Vicarage
Friskney, The Vicarage
Friskney, The Vicarage

The Vicarage was built in the 18th century and was still in use into the last half of the 20th.

It is now a private dwelling.

Postcard: early 1900s (Edward VII stamp)

Friskney, vicarage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage
Friskney, Vicarage Gate, cottage

The hand-written commentary on the reverse of this old postcard identifies the two figures as Mrs B Johnson and Mr R Robinson (the school master).

Postcard: c1904 (according to hand-written description on the reverse)

Friskney, Vicarage Cottages
Great Limber, Priest's House
Great Limber, Priest's House
Great Limber, Priest's House

A priory was founded at Limber Magna before 1180 and dissolved in the 15th century.

All that remains of the priory is the old Priest’s House with seven-feet thick stone walls.

It has been extended at various times and some of the stone has been faced with brick.

H D Martineau c.1980
Great Limber, priest's house, priory, limber magna,
Heighington, Beckfield House
Heighington, Beckfield House
Heighington, Beckfield House

Beckfield House faces onto Station Road. Facing the house to the south is the Recreation Ground, bought by Beckfield’s owner Mr Robert Wright to prevent buildings spoiling his outlook. He let the field to the village for a peppercorn rent of 1/- a year.

Mr Wright bought the house in 1918, he died there in 1933 and his widow died in 1956. The house was sold in 1957 and is now an old people's home.

This photograph was probable taken in the 1930s.

Heighington, Beckfield House, Station Road, Recreation Ground, Robert Wright
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm
Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm

An early view of the back of the farmhouse at Clarke’s Charity Farm.

This property was left by Sir Edward Clarke to provide funds for a 'Bread Charity'.

The house faces south onto High Street with the Beck running across the north end of the yard - hence the ducks!

Heighington, Clarke's Charity Farm, Bread Charity
Heighington, Council Houses
Heighington, Council Houses
Heighington, Council Houses

Council houses built 1950-51 on the north side of Almond Avenue, parallel to Fen Road.

The open space in the right foreground is part of that left for the children’s play area.

The field had been under barley the previous year; the crop was cut by a horse-drawn binder and the stooks carried to Abraham Bell’s Manor Farm by horse and cart.

One of the horses was called ‘Duke’.

Heighington, Council Houses, Abraham Bell
Heighington, Park View House
Heighington, Park View House
Heighington, Park View House

Park View House, Number One High Street.

The right hand end of the side by the road is three storeys high with the rafters of a much steeper roof still remaining under the present flatter Georgian roof.

The Dovecot on the far left is over the Bull Pen.

Did the sound of the doves give a calming background for the bull and mask sudden noises which might alarm him?

The farm buildings (Town End Farm) are now separate private dwellings. They were built to a Victorian 'High Farming' pattern; it was the largest farm in the parish.

Heighington, Park View House, Dovecot, bull pen, Town End Farm
Holbeach, Mansion House
Holbeach, Mansion House
Holbeach, Mansion House

The Mansion House in High Street, Holbeach, is thought to date from 1681, though built in Queen Anne style.

Sir Norman Angell, Nobel Peace Prize winner, was born here in 1872.

The building has recently been restored for use as a hotel and bistro bar.

Ken Redmore, 2011 

Holbeach, Norman, Angell, Mansion House, Nobel Peace Prize,
Humberston, thatched cottage
Humberston, thatched cottage
Humberston, thatched cottage

This thatched cottage stood on the south side of North Sea Lane. It was demolished c.1966.

September 1965

Humberston, thatched cottage
Immingham, Worker's Cottage
Immingham, Worker's Cottage
Immingham, Worker's Cottage

In 1907, Price, Wills and Reeve, the contractors building Immingham Docks, built temporary housing for their workers.

This bungalow on Pelham Road with its timber frame clad in corrugated iron sheets, is a surviving example.

It is now a listed building.

Frank Robinson, January 2015

Immingham, cottage, corrugate iron, Price, Wills and Reeve
Jew's House
Jew's House
Jew's House

The Jew's House at the foot of Steep Hill is a two-storeyed stone house of the twelfth century.

It is one of the oldest domestic buildings in the country and is generally considered to have been the rabbi's house.

The hall was on the upper floor with an ornate entrance from the street.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Jew's House, Steep Hill,
Jew's House
Jew's House
Jew's House

The Jew's House at the foot of Steep Hill is a two-storeyed stone house of the twelfth century.

It is one of the oldest domestic buildings in the country and is generally considered to have been the rabbi's house.

The hall was on the upper floor with an ornate entrance from the street.

Undated postcard, probably c1930

Lincoln, Jew's House, rabbi,
Jews' Court
Jews' Court
Jews' Court

Jews' Court, home of SLHA, was rescued from proposed demolition by the City Council in the 1930s.

Much of its construction is medieval and it is possibly the site of an earlier synagogue.

Buildings, Lincoln, Jews' Court
Jews' Court and Jew's House
Jews' Court and Jew's House
Jews' Court and Jew's House

Jews' Court (on the right), home of SLHA, is immediately adjacent to the Jew's House.

Much of its construction is medieval and it is possibly the site of an earlier synagogue.

Lincoln, Jews' Court, Jew's House,
Langton by Spilsby, Cottage
Langton by Spilsby, Cottage
Langton by Spilsby, Cottage

This quaint circular Cottage Orné in Langton by Spilsby (TF 392704) probably dates from the early 19th century.

(Curiously, Langton by Horncastle also has a 'Cottage Orné', though a less elaborate example that this. Dwellings of this type are quite uncommon in Lincolnshire.)


Frank Robinson, 2009

Langton By Spilsby, cottage orne,
Lincoln, Castle Hill
Lincoln, Castle Hill
Lincoln, Castle Hill

The area between Exchequer Gate and the Castle in Lincoln, known as Castle Hill, is cobbled.

The timber-framed building on the corner of Bailgate, formerly a bank and now the local tourist office, has two overhangs and three gables.

On the north side of the hill towards the castle are fine 18th and 19th century houses.

Undated postcard

Lincoln, Castle Hill, Castle, Bailgate,
Louth, Toll Cottage
Louth, Toll Cottage
Louth, Toll Cottage

The route across the Wolds from Louth to Horncastle became a turnpike following the Louth Turnpike Act of 1770.

This early 19th century toll cottage is about 1 mile SW of the centre of Louth and stands at the corner of Horncastle Road and Halfpenny Lane (TF 319860).

Frank Robinson, 2010

Louth, toll cottage house, Halfpenny Lane,
Mablethorpe, Tennyson's House
Mablethorpe, Tennyson's House
Mablethorpe, Tennyson's House

As a child and later in his youth Alfred Tennyson made frequent visits to the nearby Lincolnshire coast.

He and his brother Charles famously celebrated the publication of their first volume of poetry by declaiming the lines on the windswept beach at Mablethorpe.

For periods in each summer from 1828 and 1843 he stayed at this house, Marline Villa, High Street, Mablethorpe.

Undated postcard

Mablethorpe, Tennyson,
South Kelsey, Cottage
South Kelsey, Cottage
South Kelsey, Cottage

This cottage is situated on the banks of the Caistor Canal in South Kelsey, but no more is known about exact location or its occupiers.

It appears to be of mud-and-stud construction.

South Kelsey, cottage, mud and stud
Thimbleby, Thatched Cottages
Thimbleby, Thatched Cottages
Thimbleby, Thatched Cottages

These cottages are examples of traditional Lincolnshire 'mud and stud' construction.

They have recent alterations, but were built in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Thimbleby, thatched cottages, mud and stud,
Washingborough, Thatched Houses
Washingborough, Thatched Houses
Washingborough, Thatched Houses

These were probably the last thatched houses in Washingborough.

The view looks south with the Hunter’s Leap pub immediately on the left, at the top of Oak Hill.

Washingborough, thatched house, Hunter's Leap, Oak Hill
Wilson's Cottages, Newport
Wilson's Cottages, Newport
Wilson's Cottages, Newport

The stone cottages on Newport, Lincoln, known as Wilson's Cottages, were restored by Lincoln Civic Trust in 1993.

They were opened by H R H The Duke of Gloucester.

Pencil drawing by David Vale, 1993

Lincoln, Newport, Wilson's Cottages, Lincoln Civic Trust, Duke of Gloucester,