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Society - Folklore
 
Belton House, Stables Graffiti
Belton House, Stables Graffiti
Belton House, Stables Graffiti

Graffiti including a post mill and apotropaic marks on the outside of Belton House Stables. The stables are contemporary with the house c1688 and probably the work of master mason William Stanton.

DB 4 December 2017

Belton Kesteven, Belton House, Stables, Graffiti, Apotropaic
Caistor, Fonaby, The Stone Sack
Caistor, Fonaby, The Stone Sack
Caistor, Fonaby, The Stone Sack

This odd shaped stone once stood in a field near Fonaby Top Farm, Caistor (about 1 mile north of the town).

The tale goes as follows: One day, St Paulinus was riding by, when he spied a farmer sowing corn, and requested grain from the nearby sack to feed his ass. The grudging farmer replied  ‘That’s not a sack –it’s a stone’.   ‘Then stone it shall be’ said the saint.  And so it was.

The stone is said to be broken up now, and lying under a nearby field hedge.

See: www.themodernantiquarian.com

Undated postcard

Caistor, Fonaby Top Farm, Stone sack, St Paulinus
Laughton, Maypole Dancing
Laughton, Maypole Dancing
Laughton, Maypole Dancing

Laughton is a small village some 6 miles north of Gainsborough. Its name comes from the Old English for ‘leek enclosure’ or ‘herb garden’.

postcard, 1906

Laughton, Maypole dancing
Laughton, Maypole Dancing
Laughton, Maypole Dancing
Laughton, Maypole Dancing

Laughton is a small village some 6 miles north of Gainsborough. Its name comes from the Old English for ‘leek enclosure’ or ‘herb garden’.

postcard, 1908

Laughton, Maypole dancing