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Firsby
 
Firsby, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel

Firsby’s Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Fendyke Road opened in 1903.

July 2016

Firsby, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Firsby, Railway Gatehouse 1916
Firsby, Railway Gatehouse 1916
Firsby, Railway Gatehouse 1916
One of the few buildings surviving from the former Firsby Station on the East Lincolnshire Line is the gatehouse, or crossing keeper’s cottage, alongside the B1195.
 
This drawing of the east elevation of the gatehouse was made when a small extension was added to the north (right) in 1916.
 
It is apparent that the building was originally faced in brick, with quoins possibly in contrasting brick; and it had a slate roof.
 
Original drawing from GNR Engineers’ Office
Firsby,
Firsby, Railway Gatehouse 2021
Firsby, Railway Gatehouse 2021
Firsby, Railway Gatehouse 2021
The gatehouse, seen here from the east, as it is in the engineers’ drawing, stood on the west side of the line and south of the station at the point where the long down platform began. (Part of the platform wall can be seen in the centre of the garden.)
 
The house has retained its basic ‘footprint’, but the brick walls have been rendered and roof covered in concrete tiles.
 
Jean Howard, May 2021
Firsby,
Firsby, Railway Station
Firsby, Railway Station
Firsby, Railway Station

The village of Firsby was rather small to have such a large and imposing station as this to serve it.

Opened in 1848 it became the junction station for trains to Spilsby in 1868 and Skegness, the first section of which opened to Wainfleet in 1871.

Closed with the line in 1970, the photograph shows the almost complete remains of its overall roof which it retained to the end.

Trains to Skegness now bypass the site to the south and little remains today of this once impressive collection of buildings.

Peter Grey Archive, 1969

Firsby, railway station
Firsby, Railway Station
Firsby, Railway Station
Firsby, Railway Station
This view from the south-west looks along the principal approach road to the station.
 
This large country station had an all-over roof covering the platforms, and a cast iron footbridge.
 
In the background to the right is the chimney of the pumping station situated a short distance to the east.
 
Nearest the camera is the stationmaster’s house with a large Venetian window on the west elevation.
 
Photograph c.1900, courtesy Stewart Squires

Firsby,
Firsby, Railway Station House 1
Firsby, Railway Station House 1
Firsby, Railway Station House 1
The only surviving structure from the range of station buildings is this house. It backed on to the down platform and was the first building reached when approaching from the public road.
 
The house was probably occupied by the station master, though there was a similar house at the other end of the range.
 
The large Venetian window on the east (left) elevation seen in the photo of 1900 has been replaced by smaller conventional windows and new windows have also been inserted in the south elevation.
 
Jean Howard, May 2021
Firsby,
Firsby, Railway Station House 2
Firsby, Railway Station House 2
Firsby, Railway Station House 2
In striking contrast, the east elevation of the house is built in dull yellow brick in very plain style. This faced immediately on the down platform and was embraced by the all-over roof.
 
The windows appear to be modern replacements, though both the ground floor window and the doorway are topped by original flat arches with shaped brick voussoirs.
 
Jean Howard, May 2021
Firsby,
Firsby, Railway Station portico
Firsby, Railway Station portico
Firsby, Railway Station portico
The classical portico in front of the entrance is an unusual decorative feature for a country station.
 
Sketch by Peter Lely.
Firsby,
Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew

Firsby was once a railway junction and very little else.

St Andrew's church, built in 1856, is the work of G. E. Street*.

* George Edmund Street (1824-1881) was a leading architect in the Victorian Gothic revival. He built many churches and is best known for the Royal Courts of Justice in the Strand, London, a far cry from Firsby.

Mark Acton, 2016

Firsby, St Andrew, G E Street
Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew

Same viewpoint, same day, different camera, different photographer.

The cross seen to the left of the picture has a base and lower shaft dating from the fifteenth century. It has been restored and converted into the village war memorial.

May 2016

Firsby, St Andrew church, war memorial
Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew

Wintertime view of the church from the south.

Frank Skelton, 1970s

Firsby, St Andrew
Firsby, St Andrew, bellcote
Firsby, St Andrew, bellcote
Firsby, St Andrew, bellcote

The double bellcote is built over the west end of the nave, a common design feature of Victorian country churches.

Below the bellcote - not visible here - is a rose window in plate tracery.

May 2016

Firsby, St Andrew bellcote
Firsby-Louth, GNR Railway Boundary Marker Post
Firsby-Louth, GNR Railway Boundary Marker Post
Firsby-Louth, GNR Railway Boundary Marker Post

This GNR boundary marker post stands alongside the former East Lincolnshire line on the stretch between Firsby and Louth.

It probably indicated the boundary of the line for the benefit of the contractor during construction.

Jean Howard, 2021

Gunby, GNR post