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Gayton le Marsh
 
Gayton le Marsh, Askleigh Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Askleigh Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Askleigh Farm

A handsome composition of polychromatic brickwork: yellow ‘quoins’, and corbelled hoods above the openings.

Modern large-paned windows and concrete roof tiles have changed the original appearance.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Askleigh Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Elvins Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Elvins Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Elvins Farm

This delightful small farmhouse, with decorative brickwork and three original sash windows, stands beside a busy farmyard and would seem to be largely overlooked.
 
The name may relate to Thomas Elvin who farmed in Gayton in 1840s and whose 45 acres were taken over by a nephew Elvin Townsend.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Elvins Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Elvins Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Elvins Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Elvins Farm

The tailboard of a traditional farm cart is used as signage at the entrance to the yard. The ownership of W A Forman must post-date 1933.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Elvins Farm
Gayton le Marsh, Poplar Farm Buildings
Gayton le Marsh, Poplar Farm Buildings
Gayton le Marsh, Poplar Farm Buildings

Some of the traditional farm buildings remaining in the yard of Poplar Farm.

The yard includes three large metal silos, just out of view to the left, and is fenced off from adjoining properties.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Poplar farm
Gayton le Marsh, Smithy
Gayton le Marsh, Smithy
Gayton le Marsh, Smithy

This small building, designated a smithy on the 1905 25” map, stands at the fork of Main Road and Back Lane.
 
Samuel and John White are listed as blacksmith and wheelwright respectively from 1842 until c 1870. Although two other smiths briefly took the smithy on, both trades had disappeared by 1892.
 
Now the largest portion of the building is possibly a store or garage accessed through double doors in the right-hand end, but a recess with seat and noticeboard is provided for public use.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Smithy, Samuel John White
Gayton le Marsh, St George
Gayton le Marsh, St George
Gayton le Marsh, St George

St George's was a brick building of 1847 attached to a Perpendicular tower. Pevsner described it as 'rather depressing' & 'distasteful to look at'.¹

Conveniently condemned as unsafe it was finally destroyed by dynamite despite the efforts of the villagers to save it. 'A shameful business', thought Henry Thorold.²

¹ N. Pevsner & J. Harris, The Buildings of England: Lincolnshire, 1964

² H. Thorold, Lincolnshire Churches Revisited, 1993

 

Gayton Le Marsh, St Georhe church
Gayton le Marsh, St George, Churchyard
Gayton le Marsh, St George, Churchyard
Gayton le Marsh, St George, Churchyard

Despite the absence of St George’s church, a place of more recent burials and wild flowers – a large patch of cowslips can be seen.
 
Were the church still here this view would be captioned ‘interior looking east’.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, St George's churchyard
Gayton le Marsh, Utility Building
Gayton le Marsh, Utility Building
Gayton le Marsh, Utility Building

This small building stands on the edge of a meadow a few hundred yards from the village street. Its map reference is TF 428849.

We are still checking out its function.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, milking parlour
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)

This was built by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1894 to replace their inadequate 1837 chapel.
 
It is constructed of yellow gault bricks with a steeply pitched roof and retains the cross finial on the gable end.
 
The chapel closed in 1987 and has been converted into a house.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)

The western elevation showing the gable of the porch entrance, a rebuilt section with oriel window and a Velux roof light giving light to the inserted upper floor.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (New)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)

The old chapel is now accessed through a large opening in the far gable end and is used as a store, probably by the house immediately adjoining on the south side.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021 

Gayton Le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)

The first Wesleyan Methodist chapel was built here in 1809 and was replaced with this building in 1837. As can be seen, it was very compact and accessed directly from the road edge.
 
The chapel was abandoned when the congregation built a larger chapel in 1894.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Gayton le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)

The date stone - confirming the opening of the chapel in 1837 -  is above the central doorway.

Jean Howard, 9 May 2021

Gayton Le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel