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Settlement - Chapels
Settlement - Chapels
Hundreds of chapels were built across Lincolnshire by the Methodists and the Baptists. Even small villages often had two chapels; most towns of any size had several.
The big rash of chapel building took place between about 1840 and 1910. Since then attendance at non-conformist places of worship has declined sharply and the number of chapels still in regular use is very small.
This collection of photographs records some of the surviving buildings but also, importantly, includes images of chapel buildings when regular services were still being held or before closure and conversion to another use or even demolition.
Of particular interest are the photographs of the chapels in the Fens north of Boston taken by Barry Barton in the late 1970s. This is a comprehensive record of non-conformist places of worship in a part of the county only fully drained and developed at the beginning of the nineteenth century just as Methodism began to have a significant impact on local society.
Sources
Most of the opening and closing dates of the Methodist chapels have been obtained from Colin Shepherdson’s series of booklets (e.g. List and Brief Details of Chapels in the Alford, Skegness and Wainfleet Circuit, Past and Present, 1998).
More detailed information about non-conformist places of worship in the County can be seen on the Lincolnshire HER website and images of chapels on the Heritage Gateway website

 
Alford, Congregational Chapel
Alford, Congregational Chapel
Alford, Congregational Chapel

The former Congregational Chapel on the corner of Chauntry Road and West Street is currently a place of worship for Alford Community Church.

September 2018

Alford, Congregational Church
Alford, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Alford, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Alford, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This building on South Street was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1837. It was enlarged in 1856 and a schoolroom added in 1873.

In the early 1940s the congregation joined with the former Wesleyans in the West Street chapel.

November 2018

Alford, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Alford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Alford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Alford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This impressive Methodist Chapel on West Street was opened in 1865 following the closure of the chapel in Chapel Street. The architect was William Botterill* of Hull.

Structural problems in the 1980s brought about the sale of the chapel for commercial use. The Alford Methodist comunity use the Sunday school rooms to the rear.

September 2018

* William Botterill (1820-1903) was a prominent architect. He and his son were responsible for several public buildings in Hull and elsewhere in the country. He was the architect for the much admired Centenary Methodist Chapel in Market Rasen.

Alford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, William Botterill
Alkborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Alkborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Alkborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"The former Victorian Methodist chapel uses yellow brick dressings to contrast with the three bays of redbrick pilasters enclosing arch-headed windows.

It has a boldly dentilled gable front with finials to either side, but the ground floor has been insensitively altered to provide a garage door"

http://www.northlincs.gov.uk/EasySiteWeb/GatewayLink.aspx?alId=5708 

Inscription above the central window has been obliterated. From the rear it is evident that many roof tiles have slipped and the building is in poor condition.

DB 15 July 2018

Alkborough, Primitive Methodist chapel, church, image
Alkborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Alkborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Alkborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"Chapel. 1840 on datestone"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1241764  

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"A Society was formed in 1769 and the first chapel built in 1811/12 on the corner of Chapel Close in Front Street.

It was enlarged in 1840, the interior altered in 1994 and is now a Grade II listed building. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 15" 

DB 15 July 2018

Alkborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Althorpe, Methodist Chapel
Althorpe, Methodist Chapel
Althorpe, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Althorpe, opened in 1864, is built in contrasting red and pale cream brick.

September 2010


Althorpe, Wesleyan chapel
Anwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Anwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Anwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 it is stated that :-

"A dwelling house was licensed for worship in 1804 and the first chapel built in 1843.

It was replaced in 1886 and is now a bungalow in Chapel Lane.

The stone laying for the second chapel, in Main Road, occurred on the 10.10.1885.

The chapel is still in use, with a membership of 6, but expected to close in 1996"

DB 25 January 2020

Anwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ashby by Partney, Methodist Chapel
Ashby by Partney, Methodist Chapel
Ashby by Partney, Methodist Chapel

A Methodist society was first established in this village in 1787. This chapel, the second for the Wesleyans here, was opened in August 1885

September 2015

Ashby by Partney, Wesleyan chapel
Aslackby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Aslackby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Aslackby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Bourne Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Gerry Burrows states :-

"i) A chapel was built in 1863 by the side of a brook and rebuilt in 1882. After its closure became a baker's store but has since been demolished.

ii) The second chapel, in Temple Road was purchased from Mr Smith of Aslackby for £200 in early 1903 and may have been previously used by the Baptists. It closed in 1985 and is now a dwelling house" 

DB 20 August 2020

Aslackby, Wesleyan methodist chapel, church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church

This tiny chapel in a remote spot was built for the Wesleyans in 1857. A porch was added in 1957 to mark the centenary of the chapel.

August 2015

See other images of this church



Bardney, Dairies Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church
Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church

Looking north towards the front of the chapel.

Whitton Shield visible, mounted on the wall, to the right. 

DB 31 August 2019

Bardney Dairies, Methodist Church, chapel
Bardney, Methodist Church
Bardney, Methodist Church
Bardney, Methodist Church

The current Methodist Church in Church Lane was built in 1903 as the lecture hall and Sunday School for the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

The original chapel, which stood behind the current building, was demolished in 1973.

May 2010

Bardney, Wesleyan chapel
Bardney, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Bardney, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Bardney, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist Chapel in Wragby Road was built in 1858, as indicated by the date plaque over the door. It ceased to be used as a chapel in the 1950s.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Bardney, Primitive Methodist chapel
Barkston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Barkston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Barkston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Shepherdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"The Society was formed in 1812 and the West Street chapel opened on the 6.10.1832. It is still in use with a membership of 9" 

Unfortunately chapel closed in 2002, although the congregation continued to meet in the Village Hall until 2013.

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Barkston-Chapel--Wesleyan-Methodist-/608459.record?pt=S 

Geoff Swain Collection 9 May 1994 

Barkston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Barnetby le Wold, Methodist Chapel
Barnetby le Wold, Methodist Chapel
Barnetby le Wold, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodists have had a chapel in West Street since 1830.

The present building was opened in 1879 to which were added schoolrooms in the early twentieth century.

August 2018

Barnetby le Wold, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Barrow Haven, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barrow Haven, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barrow Haven, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) states :- 

"Ferry Road chapel was erected in 1877. It closed in 1994 and permission to sell was given in 1995. It is now standing disused"

Geoff Swain Collection 28 August 1994

Barrow Haven, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church
Barrow upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel (Now Village Hall)
Barrow upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel (Now Village Hall)
Barrow upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel (Now Village Hall)

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) states :- 

"A barn was registered for worship in September 1819 and a chapel built in 1833, also in the High Street, with a gallery being added in 1849.

A Sunday school was erected in 1853.

The last service was held on the 11.4.1943 and the chapel sold before 1947.

It is now in use as a village hall"

Geoff Swain Collection 28 August 1994

Barrow upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, Village Hall
Barrow upon Humber, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Barrow upon Humber, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Barrow upon Humber, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) states :- 

"A Society was formed in 1769 and a chapel built in the High Street in 1780.

It was enlarged in 1803 but was replaced in 1817 on the same site.

A Sunday school added in 1838.

This chapel was demolished to make way for a third chapel which was opened, again on the same site, in 1868.

A new kitchen and toilets were added in 1973.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 59" 

Geoff Swain Collection 28 August 1994

Barrow upon Humber, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel in Queen Street was the third to be built in Barton. Joseph Wright of Hull was the architect and it opened in March 1868.

Following closure as a Methodist chapel in 1961, it was used by the Salvation Army. Today it is owned by the Queen Street School Preservation Trust and has been refurbished as a community hall. It is known as the Joseph Wright Hall.

September 2017

Barton Upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Joseph Wright Hall
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The interior layout of this chapel, with steeply pitched gallery, prominent pulpit and centrally positioned organ, is typical of large Methodist chapels of the Victorian period.

The recent refurbishment has inserted a new floor at first floor level and developed the upper, gallery area as a space for concerts and performances.

The building is Grade II listed

undated photograph

Barton Upon Humber, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church
Barton upon Humber, Trinity Methodist Church

This chapel was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1861 on the site of an early 19th century chapel.

It was originally named the Wesley Chapel.

March 2016

See other images of this church

Barton Upon Humber, Methodist Church, Wesleyan chapel
Barton upon Humber, Waterside Methodist (Wesleyan Mission Chapel)
Barton upon Humber, Waterside Methodist (Wesleyan Mission Chapel)
Barton upon Humber, Waterside Methodist (Wesleyan Mission Chapel)

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) it is stated that :-

"The chapel in Waterside was opened on the 27.5.1868 and a Sunday school added and opened on the 9.11.1882.

The last service held on the 29.3.1959.

The premises were subsequently used by the Boys' Brigade but were put up for sale in 1990.

It was sold in 1997 and is now bricked up and disused"

Geoff Swain Collection 17 August 1993

Barton Upon Humber, Waterside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, Image
Bassingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Bassingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Bassingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel at Bassingham was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1839.

It is unexpectedly large (500 'sittings') for a village with a population below 1000.

August 2016

Bassingham, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan
Baston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Baston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Baston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This was the second Wesleyan Methodist chapel on Main Road. It opened in 1877 and closed for worship in 1935.

It has since been used as garage premises.

April 2019

Baston, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan
Beckingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Beckingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Beckingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel now the Village Hall.

Date tablet is indecipherable.

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1937 mentions the chapel but its date of closure is unknown.

White's Directory of 1856 mentions "a small Wesleyan Chapel" but this is probably an earlier building.

DB 8 October 2018

Beckingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Village Hall
Belchford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Belchford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Belchford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, in Chapel Lane, now a private house, was last used for worship in 1991.

Inscription states the chapel was erected in 1871; the opening service was held on 6 June 1872.

DB 3 September 2018

Belchford, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel
Belton (Axholme), Methodist Chapel
Belton (Axholme), Methodist Chapel
Belton (Axholme), Methodist Chapel
September 2010
Belton Axholme, Methodist Chapel
Benington,Sea End, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Benington,Sea End, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Benington,Sea End, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This Primitive Methodist Chapel opened in 1838 and initially closed in 1890.

However, for some reason the local ‘cause’ revived and the chapel reopened for a short period between 1908 and 1915 but then it finally closed as a place of worship.

The building was sold in 1918 and was converted into a dwelling, ‘Rose Cottage’

It is located at the junction of Sea End Road and Spicer’s Lane (TF 408 461)

Barry Barton, 1978
Benington, Sea End Primitive Methodist Chapel
Billingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Billingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Billingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former chapel in Chapel Street now a private residence. 

Colin Shepherdson in A Brief History of the Bourne Circuit states that

"The Society was formed in 1802 and the first chapel built in Chapel Street in 1829, and enlarged in 1858.

It was replaced by High Street chapel in 1906 but not sold until 1929 and is now converted into a dwelling house"

High Street chapel was demolished in June 1995

DB 7 November 2020 

Billingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Billinghay, Baptist Church
Billinghay, Baptist Church
Billinghay, Baptist Church

Built in the late eighteenth century with later additions, Bethel Baptist Chapel is Grade II listed.

It remains in active use as a place of worship.

April 2018

Billinghay, Bethel Baptist chapel
Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st West Street)
Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st West Street)
Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st West Street)

The date stone, missing in this image but which has subsequently been replaced, reads "PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHAPEL 1850 RENOVATED 2017" 

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"The first chapel was erected in 1851, in West Street, and is now in use as a storehouse"

The front of the building, facing onto West Street, formally had a central doorway but no windows.

DB 25 June 2018

Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Church
Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel (2nd High Street)
Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel (2nd High Street)
Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel (2nd High Street)

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"The second chapel was erected in the High Street in 1912 and closed on the 6.1.1996.

The chapel is currently standing empty" 

Now in use as a private house.

DB 13 June 2020 

Billinghay, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Church
Billinghay, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Billinghay, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Billinghay, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"i) A dwelling house was licensed for worship in 1793.

The Society subsequently rented a chapel, erected in 1817, but in 1832 they built their own chapel in King Street.

This chapel has since been demolished.

ii) The second chapel, in Victoria Street, was built in 1867 but very soon had to be demolished and was replaced in 1869 by another on the same site.

This chapel is still in use"

DB 25 June 2018

Billinghay, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Binbrook, Free Methodist Chapel / Queens Hall
Binbrook, Free Methodist Chapel / Queens Hall
Binbrook, Free Methodist Chapel / Queens Hall

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Market Rasen & Caistor Circuit” (Revised August 1998) Shepherdson & Mumby state :- 

"A Society was formed in 1855 and the foundation stone for a chapel, in Kirmond Road, was laid later in the same year, on the 9th August, and opened before the year ended on the 23th December.

It was renovated and reopened on the 31.7.1872.

The chapel was rebuilt on the same site with the stone laying taking place on the 1.6.1914.

The last service was held on the 1.7.1934 and the congregation then joined with the ex-Wesleyans.

The chapel was let to the Air Ministry from 1941 to 1946, and then let as a youth club from 1946 to 1954.

It was put up for sale in 1954 and sold in 1959 to became the "Queens Hall Village Centre""

DB 10 October 2018

Binbrook, Free Methodist Chapel, Queens Hall
Binbrook, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Binbrook, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Binbrook, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This image shows the original 1836 building.
 
In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Market Rasen & Caistor Circuit” (Revised August 1998) Shepherdson & Mumby state :-
 

"(i) A chapel was opened on the 27.10.1836 "in a lane off the village centre".

It closed with the opening of the new one, subsequently sold and is now in use as a garage/store shed in what used to be called Ranter's Row and now called Mount Pleasant.

ii) The foundation stone for a second chapel, in Market Place, was laid on the 15.11.1877 but the building not opened until 1879.

The last service was held on the 30.12.1934.

It was sold in 1946 for conversion in to a house and butcher's shop, and is still in use as such" 

DB 10 October 2018

Binbrook, Primitive Methodist chapel
Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Image shows the third Wesleyan Methodist chapel built on High Street in 1877/78.

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Market Rasen & Caistor Circuit” (Revised August 1998) Shepherdson & Mumby state :- 

"i) A Society was formed in 1769 and a chapel built in 1796.

ii) The building of a new chapel, in the High Street, commenced in 1815 but it was not opened until the 1.9.1816. ...

iii) The foundation stone for the third chapel, on the other side of the High Street, was laid on the 15.11.1877. Designed by Bellamy & Hardy of Lincoln. the chapel opened on the 13.6.1878"

Binbrook Methodist Church left its building in 2003 :-

http://www.woldsandtrentmethodist.org.uk/churches/1-binbrook 

DB 10 October 2018

Binbrook, Weleyan Methodist Chapel, Bellamy & Hardy
Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Image shows the second Wesleyan Methodist chapel built on High Street in 1815/16.

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Market Rasen & Caistor Circuit” (Revised August 1998) Shepherdson & Mumby state

"i) A Society was formed in 1769 and a chapel built in 1796.

ii) The building of a new chapel, in the High Street, commenced in 1815 but it was not opened until the 1.9.1816.

It was used as a Sunday school for many years after the opening of the third chapel in 1878.

Some time later it was sold and is now in use as a builder's store"

DB 10 October 2018

Binbrook, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Sunday school
Bishop Norton, Methodist Free Church
Bishop Norton, Methodist Free Church
Bishop Norton, Methodist Free Church

Inscripton states "METHODIST FREE CHURCH 1865"

DB 12 May 2019

Bishop Norton, Free Methodist, Church, Chapel
Bishop Norton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Bishop Norton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Bishop Norton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This former chapel, erected for the Primitive Methodists, opened in June 1875.

In 1949 the Wesleyan Methodists in the village closed their chapel and joined the 'Prims' to worship here.

The chapel closed in 1993.

August 2018

Bishop Norton, Methodist Chapel
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st)
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st)
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st)

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state :- 

"A chapel was erected in 1822 and enlarged in 1840 and again in 1867, It was sold in 1891, following the opening of a new one, and is now in use as by the Victorian Club in Laughton Road"

DB 28 January 2020

Blyton, Primitive Methodist, Chapel, Church
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st)
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st)
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (1st)

"PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHAPEL 1865"

Date does not tie in with those mentioned by Sheperson & English "erected in 1822 and enlarged in 1840 and again in 1867"

DB 28 January 2020

Blyton, Primitive Methodist, Chapel, Church
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (2nd)
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (2nd)
Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel (2nd)

Dated 1891 above the door. 

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state :-  

"The stone laying for the second chapel, in the High Street, took place on the 27.5.1891 and the building opened in November of the same year, An organ was installed in 1906 and the interior restyled in 1971. It is still in use with a membership of 19"

Unfortunately the chapel closed in 2003.

DB 28 January 2020

Blyton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states that "The Wesleyan chapel was erected in 1822"

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state :- 

"The High Street chapel was erected in 1827 and the last service held on the 27.1.1957 when the congregation joined with the ex-Prims in their chapel.

The chapel continued in use as an annex but was put up for sale in 1962 and finally sold in 1969.

It is now a private house, "The Old Chapel""

DB 28 January 2020

Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel, Church
Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"WESLEYAN CHAPEL 1822" 

DB 28 January 2020

Blyton, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel, Church
Bonby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Bonby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Bonby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) states :-

"Erected in 1813, Main Street chapel is a Grade II listed building and is still in use with a membership of 5" 

Unfortunately the chapel was subsequently closed in 2002.

Geoff Swain Collection 18 October 1993

Bonby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Boston, Baptist Church
Boston, Baptist Church
Boston, Baptist Church

Boston's General Baptist Church on High Street was built in 1837 in the Early Gothic Revival style of the period.

Pale buff (Gault) brick is laid in Flemish Bond.

November 2018

Boston, General Baptist Church
Boston, Baptist Church
Boston, Baptist Church
Boston, Baptist Church

View from the gallery.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388899  

"In more recent times the Church has been modernised and provides comfortable seating for 150 on the ground floor and seating, at present unused, in the balcony for 250" 

DB 5 June 2019

Boston, Baptist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church

Centenary Methodist Church in Red Lion Street, Boston, was built by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1839-40 and had an attractive facade with twin towers and a colonnade between them.

The church shown here burnt down on 29 June 1909.

Postcard, c1908
Boston, wesleyan, methodist,
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church

After the loss of the previous church on this site, destroyed by fire in 1909, this church was built. The opening date was 30 March 1911.

November 2018

Boston, Centenary Methodist Chapel Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Centenary Methodist Church

"Arrangement and fittings date from 1910"

"The church can seat 1200 and is known locally as the Methodist Cathedral"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388976 

DB 5 June 2019

Boston, Wesleyan, Centenary Methodist Church
Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Congregational Church
Boston, Congregational Church

The Congregational Church, built in 1868 by Innocent & Brown of Sheffield, stood in Red Lion Street. It seated 500.

Pevsner (The Buildings of England: Lincolnshire, 1st edition) has one word for it: horrible.

The church closed in 1972 and the site is now a car park.

From The Boston Album of Views, c.1900

Boston, Congregational Church, Innocent & Brown
Boston, Freiston Road, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Boston, Freiston Road, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Boston, Freiston Road, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A small chapel built in typical style for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1876. The last service was held here in May 1966.

November 2018

Boston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Boston, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was in West Street.

Photograph from 'The Boston Album of Views', c.1900

Boston, Primitive methodist chapel
Boston, Unitarian Chapel
Boston, Unitarian Chapel
Boston, Unitarian Chapel

The former Unitarian Chapel or Meeting House on Spain Lane (now adjacent to John Adams Way) was built in 1819 and opened in 1820.

The painted sign by the entrance still notes its opening for services at 5.00 pm on the first and third Sundays of the month. It is used by other local community groups.

November 2018

Boston, Unitarian chapel
Bourne, Baptist Chapel
Bourne, Baptist Chapel
Bourne, Baptist Chapel

"1835. 2 storeys. Simple classical front in ashlar with pilasters at corners ...  Interior - attractive iron balustrade to platform and pulpit steps"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1241973 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1889 states "The Baptist chapel, erected in 1835, at a cost of £1,700, has 500 sittings"

DB 8 July 2019

Bourne, Baptist Chapel, Church
Bourne, Burghley Street Chapel
Bourne, Burghley Street Chapel
Bourne, Burghley Street Chapel

Chapel located in Burghley Street but unclear what denomination.

The sign reads "You are invited to a preaching of the WORD of GOD each Lord's day at 6-30pm. if the Lord will"

DB 20 August 2020

Bourne, Chapel
Bourne, United Reformed Church
Bourne, United Reformed Church
Bourne, United Reformed Church

This unusual building on Eastgate was built as a Congregational Church in 1846.

EN, August 2019

Bourne, United Reformed Church
Bourne, Vestry Hall (Plymouth Brethren)
Bourne, Vestry Hall (Plymouth Brethren)
Bourne, Vestry Hall (Plymouth Brethren)

Located off North Street behind the old National School. 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1909 has an entry "Plymouth Brethren, North street; 6.30 p.m"

DB 8 July 2019

Bourne, Vestry Hall, Plymouth Brethren
Bourne, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Bourne, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Bourne, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"Methodist Church 1839 Thames Pilkington ... Interior gallery (dated 1867) with decorated frontal other victorian fittings, complete but unexceptional"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1260237 

Colin Shepherdson in A Brief History of the Bourne Circuit states that :-

"The Society was formed in 1809 and used a room in John Brown's cottage in Star Lane, now known as Abbey Road.

The first chapel was built in 1812 in Abbey Road, but standing well back from the road.

A second chapel, erected in front of the old one and which was retained for use as a Sunday school, was opened on the 23.3.1842 facing Abbey Road.

A gallery was added in 1867 and a new organ opened on the 17.11.1920.

The slate roof was replaced with asbestos sheeting in 1953.

Plans were drawn up for the erection of new schoolrooms and hall and the first phase completed in November 1958.

The second phase involved the demolition of the first chapel, in 1964 and was completed with the opening of the new church hall on the 23.5.1965.

The church was declared unsafe in 1987 and the congregation continued to worship using the church hall.

The church, a Grade II listed building, remained unused whilst plans were drawn up to make it safe, more suitable to current needs and whilst the congregation raised the considerable sums necessary to complete the work.

The church was gutted, repaired, made safe and reopened on the 6.10.1995 as a two storey building.

Plans to replace the balcony, which has been removed, with a floor of schoolrooms have not yet been implemented. The church is still in use with a membership of 110" 

DB 8 July 2019 

Bourne, Wesleyan Methodist, Thames Pilkington
Bracebridge Heath, Methodist Church
Bracebridge Heath, Methodist Church
Bracebridge Heath, Methodist Church

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) it is stated that :-

"The first chapel was built in 1872 and a Sunday school added and opened on the 20.10.1880. The foundation stone for a new chapel, built behind the old one in Grantham Road, was laid on the 19.4.1969 and opened in October of the same year. The old chapel was then demolished to make a car park in front of the new one. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 25"

Originally a Primitive Methodist Chapel. 

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Bracebridge Heath, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, image
Bracebridge Heath, St John's Hospital, Chapel
Bracebridge Heath, St John's Hospital, Chapel
Bracebridge Heath, St John's Hospital, Chapel

"Chapel. 1869 by Robert Young with Dr Palmer"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1061751  

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states

"a new chapel was erected in 1869 and will seat 450; there is also a cemetery of two acres, with a mortuary chapel"

DB 20 February 2019 

 

Bracebridge Heath, St John's Hospital, Chapel, Robert Young
Branston Booths, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston Booths, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston Booths, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel and Sunday school in Moor Lane, Branston Booths were built in 1911 to replace an earlier chapel built in 1847. They were converted into a house in 2005.

Pearl Wheatley, 2102

Branston, Booths, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Lane, Branston was built in 1883 at a cost of £1100 next to the previous chapel which became the Sunday school. The lancet windows on the ground floor are as original.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Branston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House
Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House
Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House

"The Friends Meeting House is thought to have originally been a barn, which was acquired in 1673 and converted into a meeting house in 1701, when it was encased in stone"

"The building was donated to the Society of Friends in 1701 by Thomas Robinson, a prominent Quaker who moved to Brant Broughton from London in 1665"

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Friends-Meeting-House--Meeting-House-Lane--Brant-Broughton/242481.record?pt=S 

DB 2 July 2018

Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House, Thomas Robinson, Quaker
Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House
Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House
Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House

"Interior of main Meeting House has original plain dado panelling, raised slightly higher on the north wall behind the raised stand"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1061898 

DB 8 September 2018

Brant Broughton, Friends Meeting House, Quaker
Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"The first chapel in Mill Lane was built in 1812 or 1815 and was replaced by newer buildings in 1832 and again in 1858.

The large school was erected in 1852"

"The chapel closed in 2003 and the former chapel and school room have been converted to four residential units" 

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Wesleyan-chapel--Mill-Lane--Brant-Broughton/242488.record?pt=S 

July 2018


Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Reform Chapel
Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Reform Chapel
Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Reform Chapel

"The chapel was built in Maltkiln Lane in 1862. 

It is part of the Sleaford Wesleyan Reform Union Circuit.

The Wesleyan Reform Union has remained independent of the denominational unions of 1857, 1907 and 1932"

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Brant-Broughton--Maltkiln-Lane-Chapel--Wesleyan-Reform-Union-/581833.record?pt=S 

DB 2 July 2018

Brant Broughton, Wesleyan Reform Chapel, church, image
Brigg, Methodist Church
Brigg, Methodist Church
Brigg, Methodist Church

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Brigg Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn White September 1997 (Revised July 1998) states :-

"A new all purpose church at the junction of Barnard Avenue and Wesley Road was erected in 1962/3.

The foundation stone for an extension was laid on the 13.4.1963 and it was opened on the 8.12.1963.

A further extension was opened on the 4.12.1993.

The church is still in use with a membership of 66" 

Geoff Swain Collection 18 October 1993

Brigg, Methodist Church
Brigg, St John the Evangelist and Methodist Church
Brigg, St John the Evangelist and Methodist Church
Brigg, St John the Evangelist and Methodist Church

This view looking east along Bigby Street shows the parish church of St John Evangelist with the post-war church hall in front.

Nearer the camera is the imposing facade of the Methodist Church of 1865. It was built for the Wesleyan Reform Union*, closed for worship in 1962 and demilished in 1966.

* The Wesleyan Reform Union, one of several splinter groups in Methodism, was formed in 1859. Churches were independent and self-governing; they did not join in unions of other branches of the Methodist Church. However, the Brigg WRU chapel became a member of the United Methodist connexion at some date in the second half of the 19th century.

Frith postcard, undated

Brigg, St John Evangelist, Wesleyan Reform Union
Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Broughton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan chapel on High Street was built in 1849. Exactly 100 years later the Primitive Methodists closed their chapel and merged with the Wesleyans in this building.

July 2019

Broughton, Methodist Church Wesleyan, Primitive
Brumby, Old Brumby United Church
Brumby, Old Brumby United Church
Brumby, Old Brumby United Church

Originally a Wesleyan Methodist chapel. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"i) The chapel was erected in 1834 in what is now called Old Brumby Street. It was replaced by Ashby Road chapel in 1929 and the old chapel demolished. The site is now occupied by housing.

ii) The foundation stone for the second chapel, in Ashby Road, was laid on the 28.2.1929 and the chapel opened on the 19.9.1929.

An old army hut was used as a schoolroom until a new Sunday school was built, the foundation stone having being laid on the 15.2.1953 and opened on the 7.11.1953.

The complex was demolished and replaced on the same site by the new St Marks Church which was opened on the 24.5.1962.

The church is still in use with a membership of 151"

Now a local ecumenical partnership joining St. Andrew's United Reformed Church with St. Mark's Methodist Church.

DB 27 March 2019

Old Brumby United Church, St Mark, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel
Brumby, Old Brumby United Church
Brumby, Old Brumby United Church
Brumby, Old Brumby United Church

Rotary Festival of Christmas Trees in progress - around 80 decorated Christmas trees on display in an event raising money for charity.

DB 15 December 2019

Old Brumby United Church, St Mark, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel
Burringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Burringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Burringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) states :- 

"The Society was formed in 1781 and the first chapel erected in the High Street in 1804.

It was replaced on the same site by a second chapel in 1863.

The chapel was renovated and re-opened on the 27.10.1927.

A Sunday school was added to the rear in 1964.

The chapel closed on the 2.6.1991 and was sold in 1996. The chapel now stands boarded up and unused" 

Geoff Swain Collection 17 August 1993

Burringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Burton upon Stather, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Burton upon Stather, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Burton upon Stather, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"The first chapel was built in 1823 or 1833, and the foundation stone for the "Jubilee" chapel, probably on the same site in the High Street, was laid on the 6.9.1868.

This second chapel opened in April 1869.

The interior was altered in 1961 and now incorperates fittings from Scunthorpe Trinity chapel.

The schoolrooms were opened on the 10.6.1961 and the chapel is still in use with a membership of 41"

Geoff Swain Collection 17 August 1993

Burton upon Stather, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Church, Image
Cadney, Primitive Methodist Centenary Church
Cadney, Primitive Methodist Centenary Church
Cadney, Primitive Methodist Centenary Church

Chapel opened 1909 replacing an earlier building dating from 1856. 

http://www.myprimitivemethodists.org.uk/page/cadney_centenary_primitive_methodist_chapel

Closed 1973.

DB 17 June 2018

Cadney, Primitive Methodist Centenary Church
Caistor, Independent Chapel
Caistor, Independent Chapel
Caistor, Independent Chapel

This building, now the library of Caistor Grammar School, was originally a Congregational Church erected in 1842.

Distinctive features include yellow brick, Doric pilasters and tapered window and door surrounds.

The town's non-conformist graveyard lies behind.

Ken Redmore, 2010

See other images of this church
Caistor, Independent Congregational Chapel, Caistor Grammar School
Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This Primitive Methodist chapel was opened in 1868 and a Sunday School added two years later.

The last service was held in 1966 and it was then acquired by the County Council and used as a youth club.

As Caistor Heritage Centre it now houses the town’s library and a popular café.

Drawing by Rex Russell (1916-2104)


Caistor, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The large Wesleyan Methodist Church in Caistor dates from 1842.

Alongside to the left is the former Methodist Primary School (1867-1967).

Ken Redmore, 2010

See other images of this church 

Caistor, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Carlton le Moorland, Baptist Chapel
Carlton le Moorland, Baptist Chapel
Carlton le Moorland, Baptist Chapel

Former Baptist Chapel in Broughton Road.

Other images on the web show the building in use by a seed merchant. 

http://www.picturesofengland.com/England/Lincolnshire/Carlton-le-Moorland/pictures/1083657 

Now a private house and evident that two additional round headed windows have been inserted. 

See also

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Records/RecordDisplayStandard.aspx?oid=242455 

DB 13 June 2018

Carlton le Moorland, Baptist Chapel
Carlton le Moorland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Carlton le Moorland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Carlton le Moorland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"The chapel in High Street was built in 1863 and closed in 1986"

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Carlton-le-Moorland-Chapel--Wesleyan-Methodist-/899928.record?pt=S

Ashlar tablet in the front elevation inscribed Wesleyan Chapel MDCCCLXIII - hidden by foliage in this view.

DB 13 June 2018

Carlton le Moorland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Caythorpe, Methodist Chapel
Caythorpe, Methodist Chapel
Caythorpe, Methodist Chapel

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel.

"The first chapel was built in 1824, but was replaced by a new chapel in 1851, which closed in 1982"

https://www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/upload/public/attachments/705/methc_caythorpe.pdf

Building now occupied by Decorative Country Living Ltd.

https://decorativecountryliving.com 

DB 25 April 2018

Caythorpe, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel, Decorative Country Living Ltd
Chapel Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Chapel Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Chapel Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Coningsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised July 1998) states that :-

"A house was registered for worship in 1797 and the first chapel, also known as Swineshead Chapel Hill, erected in 1817.

A second chapel was erected on the same site in 1843.

The present chapel was opened on the 18.4.1904, again on the same site, and the last service was held in 30.6.1996 when the membership was 6.

Chapel Hill remained on the plan until June 1997 and the chapel is now standing disused"

Image shows that it has now been converted into a private dwelling. 

DB 21 September 2020

Chapel Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Cherry Willingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Cherry Willingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Cherry Willingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Cherry Willingham Wesleyan Methodist Chapel was built in 1836. The builders paid attention to detail and made this little one-cell chapel decorative.

It is in red brick but has yellow brick trimmings and round headed windows.

The plaque above the door, now gone, was very large for the size of the chapel – what did it say?

The building is well cared for now with its use as the Parish Council Office.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Cherry Willingham, methodist, wesleyan,
Claypole, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Claypole, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Claypole, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Primitive Methodist Chapel, Main Street, Claypole which opened in 1897.

http://www.myprimitivemethodists.org.uk/page/claypole_primitive_methodist_chapel 

Now a private house.

DB 24 September 2018

Claypole, Primitive Methodist chapel, church, image
Claypole, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lane
Claypole, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lane
Claypole, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lane

Inscription above door states

"WESLEYAN CHAPEL 1835" 

DB 24 September 2018

Claypole, Wesleyan methodist chapel, church, image
Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church

This chapel on the corner of Grimsby Road and Tennyson Road was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1914.

It is a Grade II listed building.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, Beaconthorpe Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, King's Baptist Church
Cleethorpes, King's Baptist Church
Cleethorpes, King's Baptist Church

This is the site of one of the most devastating Zeppelin raids of World War I. On 1 April 1916 a bomb landed on roof of the Baptist Church Hall where men of the 3rd (Special Reserve) Battalion of the Manchester Regiment were billeted.

Of the men in the building, 27 died instantly and 4 were fatally injured, dying soon after from their wounds.

The current church was founded in February 1988, though the plain brick building dates from an earlier period.

June 2017

Cleethorpes, King's Baptist church, Zeppelin raid
Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel stood in Mill Road. It was built in 1877 and was demolished in 1979.

The new St Andrew’s Methodist Church is on the same site.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, Primitive Methodist church
Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church

St Andrew’s Methodist chapel on the corner of St Peter’s Avenue and Mill Road was opened in 1979.

It replaced a former Primitive Methodist Chapel on the same site, built in 1877, which developed structural problems and was demolished in 1978.

The current church has buttresses on the north elevation (seen here); perhaps it will suffer the same fate as its predecessor?

June 2017

Cleethorpes, St Andrew Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church

This, the second Wesleyan Methodist chapel on the site in St Peter's Avenue, was opened in 1885. It was known as Trinity.

The church closed in 1968 and was demolished in 1973.

undated postcard

Cleethorpes, Wesleyan Methodist Church, Trinity
Coleby, Methodist Church
Coleby, Methodist Church
Coleby, Methodist Church

The former Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Blind Lane was built in 1903 on the site of previous chapel, built in 1835, which burnt down.

The last service was held here in 1997 and it has since been converted into a dwelling.

April 2017

Coleby, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Colsterworth, Wesleyan Methodist Church and Hall
Colsterworth, Wesleyan Methodist Church and Hall
Colsterworth, Wesleyan Methodist Church and Hall

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Shepherdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

"A barn was used for preaching services from 1799 until another barn was purchased in 1815 and fitted up as a chapel.

This barn was sold in 1835 following the opening of a new chapel.

A "more eligible site" had been rented in Back Lane and the stonelaying of the new chapel occurred on the 22.6.1835 and the opening on the 6.11.1835.

The rented chapel site together with an adjacent site, suitable for a Sunday school, were purchased in 1905.

The foundation stone for the Sunday school, designed by Bell, Withers & Meredith of London, was laid on the 11.6.1908 and the building opened on the 27.8.1908.

The chapel was remodelled and extended at the same time and re-opened on the 9.10.1908.

The present organ was installed in 1927.

An additional room was added in 1994 and the chapel is still in use with a membership of 18". It is on Back Lane.

DB 1 April 2019

Colsterworth, Wesleyan Methodist Church and Hall
Colsterworth, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / United Methodist
Colsterworth, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / United Methodist
Colsterworth, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / United Methodist

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

"Some part of an industrial property was registered for worship on the 25.4.1851 and a chapel in the High Street was in use by 1855.

The foundation stone for a new chapel in the High Street was laid on the 27.5.1858.

The chapel, to a design by W. Thompson of Grantham, was opened on the 17.7.1858.

The chapel was closed in 1948, sold in 1950 and is now a private house"

DB 1 April 2019

Colsterworth, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / United Methodist
Coningsby Moor Primitive Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moor Primitive Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moor Primitive Methodist Chapel

A chapel which opened in 1850 and held its last service in June 1964.

The building was sold the following year and for many years stood derelict and roofless – possibly only a wall remains.

It is located in Langrick Road, Coningsby parish (TF 245 567)

Barry Barton, 1978
Coningsby, Moor Primjtive Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This Wesleyan chapel was built in 1843 or 1845 and enlarged in 1888.

A Sunday school was added in 1908 and the chapel closed for worship in 1987.

It has been converted into a house ‘Chateau Coningsby 1990’

It is located on Moorside Road in the parish of Coningsby (TF 246 580)

Barry Barton, 1980

Coningsby, Moorside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby Moorside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former chapel has been transformed. Some elements of the gable end have been retained but the centrally placed doorway is now part of a Venetian window.

A layer of stucco covers the attractive brickwork.

May 2018

Coningsby, Moorside Methodist Chapel
Coningsby, Baptist Church
Coningsby, Baptist Church
Coningsby, Baptist Church

There is record of a congregation of General Baptists in Coningsby and Tattershall as early as the mid-1600s.

The current building, dating from 1862, is still in active use.

August 2017

Coningsby, baptist church
Coningsby, United Methodist Church
Coningsby, United Methodist Church
Coningsby, United Methodist Church

Website states :-

"The Chapel is only ten years old , it was once a doctors surgery, but a revamp enabled us to redesign the building to what we have today"

http://www.mysgw.co.uk/Page.asp?PageID=325&SiteID=197 

DB 5 April 2018 

Coningsby, United Methodist
Coningsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Coningsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Dogdyke Road which closed in 2007.

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Coningsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised July 1998) it is stated that :-

"The first record of a preaching room was on the 12.6.1755 and it stood on the northern part of the present Dogdyke Road site.

It was replaced by the chapel opened by John Wesley on the 6.7.1779.

This chapel was demolished to make way for the current one which opened on the 8.12.1825.

It was altered in 1906 by the removal of the gallery, changing the pulpit and pews, and adding a porch and vestibule.

A schoolroom was also added and the old one convened into vestries.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 58"

DB 1 July 2019

Coningsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

i) A Dissenter's Certificate was issued in 1829 and the first chapel built in 1845.

It was sold in 1903, following the opening of the new chapel, and is now a private dwelling standing opposite the present chapel.

ii) The foundation stone of the second chapel, in Station Road, was laid on the 7.8.1902 and the chapel opened on the 8.1.1903.

A Sunday school was added and opened on the 9.1.1936.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 23"

DB 27 June 2018

Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)
Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (Old)

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

"i) A Dissenter's Certificate was issued in 1829 and the first chapel built in 1845.

It was sold in 1903, following the opening of the new chapel, and is now a private dwelling standing opposite the present chapel"

Date stone reads "1846" 

DB 27 June 2018

Corby Glen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Cowbit, Methodist Chapel
Cowbit, Methodist Chapel
Cowbit, Methodist Chapel

The foundation stone for this Methodist chapel, which over the years served more than one branch of the denomination, was laid in July 1912.

It closed in 1983 and has since been converted into a house.

September 2017

Cowbit, Methodist chapel
Cowbridge Baptist Chapel
Cowbridge Baptist Chapel
Cowbridge Baptist Chapel

It is located close to the B1183 and the West Fen Drain in Fishtoft parish (TF 327 471)

Barry Barton, 1978

Fishtoft, Cowbridge Baptist Chapel
Croft, Oak Bridge Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Croft, Oak Bridge Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Croft, Oak Bridge Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Alford, Skegness & Wainfleet Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson July 1998 states :-

"The first chapel was erected in 1842 on Lymn Bank and was replaced on the same site by another opened on the 23.9.1888.

The last service was held in September 1994 and the chapel sold in 1996 and is now in the process of being converted into a house"

Geoff Swain Collection 15 August 1999 

Croft, Oak Bridge Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Crowle, Baptist Chapel
Crowle, Baptist Chapel
Crowle, Baptist Chapel

The Baptist church in Crowle dates from 1879.

Built of rendered brick with quoins and arched windows, the building is described by Pevsner as ‘remarkable conservative’.  Possibly it incorporates the earlier building of 1820.

Following closure in 2010, the church, together with its adjacent graveyard, has been for sale.

Ken Redmore, 2011

Crowle, Baptist Church Chapel
Cumberworth, Methodist Church
Cumberworth, Methodist Church
Cumberworth, Methodist Church

This chapel on Willoughby Road was the last one in village used by the Methodists.

It was built in 1853 as a Wesleyan Reform chapel, later to become Free Methodist and then United Methodist before the general union of Methodist churches in 1932.

September 2018

Cumberworth, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan Reform
Donington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Donington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Donington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel, built in 1903, was the third place of worship for the Wesleyan Methodists on this site in Church Street.

September 2011


Donington, Wesleyan Chapel
Dorrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Dorrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Dorrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"i) A chapel was erected in 1833.

ii) The Main Street chapel was built in 1881 and closed in 1987. It is now in the process of being convened into a dwelling" 

Now a private house. 

DB 8 June 2020

Dorrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Dunston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Dunston, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Dunston, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"A Society was established circa September 1850 and a chapel erected in 1859 in Chapel Lane.

The chapel was enlarged in 1870 and the foundation stone for a schoolroom was laid on the 22.7.1925.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 15"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Dunston, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, image
Dunston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Dunston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Dunston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"i) The first chapel was erected in 1832.

ii) The second chapel was built in Middle Street in 1884. The last service was held on the 21.6.1953 and the chapel is now converted into a dwelling house"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Dunston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lodge, church, image
Dyke Baptist Chapel
Dyke Baptist Chapel
Dyke Baptist Chapel

"Money for the building was raised by public subscription and Thomas Wilcox was commissioned as architect.

Local builders Messrs Wilcox and Son were given the job and completed it at a cost of £315.

The chapel was opened the following year in May 1879"

For an excellent and much fuller history of Dyke and the Baptist Chapel please see :- 

http://dykehistory.org.uk/dyke-baptist-chapel 

DB 20 August 2020

Dyke Baptist Chapel, Church
Eagle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Eagle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Eagle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The red-brick chapel in High Street was built for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1903. It closed in 1981 and has been converted to residential use.

October 2016

Eagle, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
East Barkwith, Methodist Chapel
East Barkwith, Methodist Chapel
East Barkwith, Methodist Chapel

The third Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in the vllage was built on the corner of Panton Road and Lincoln Road in 1925. It closed for worship in 1977.

August 2018

East Barkwith, Methodist Chapel
East Butterwick, Primitive Methodist Chapel
East Butterwick, Primitive Methodist Chapel
East Butterwick, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Date stone reads "PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHAPEL 1870"

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :- 

"Chapel was built in 1830 and rebuilt in 1870 - foundation stone laid on the 15.7.1870 and reopened on the 27.11.1870.

It closed in 1969 due to its poor structural condition.

The congregation transferred to St Andrew's Anglican church, in the High Street, where they still hold services with a membership of 5.

The chapel was sold by auction on the 15.8.1973 with planning permission to convert it into a house but it is now disused and bricked up" 

House conversion has now obviously been completed.

DB 18 June 2019 

East Butterwick, Primitive Methodist Chapel
East Fen, Primitive Methodist Chapel
East Fen, Primitive Methodist Chapel
East Fen, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Built close to Hobhole Drain at Lade Bank Bridge in 1855, the chapel was enlarged in 1891.

The last service in the chapel was held in 1969 and the building was sold later that year.

It currently serves as the garage for the neighbouring bungalow.

It is located in New Leake parish (TF 379 548)

Barry Barton, 1978

New Leake, East Fen Primitive Methodist Chapel
East Halton, Methodist Church
East Halton, Methodist Church
East Halton, Methodist Church

The current Methodist Church in East Halton was built in 1967 on the site of the former Primitive Methodist chapel of 1878.

January 2019

East Halton, Methodist Chapel
East Halton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Halton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Halton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel, designed by Richard Coulson* of Hull, opened in 1889. It is situated on Townside at the southern edge of the village.

The last service was held in 1953 when the two Methodist societies in the village combined and used the Primitive Methodist chapel.

It now serves a the village hall.

January 2019

* Richard Coulson, son of a farmer in the village, born 1860, was articled to the architect William Marshall of Hull, later working for Hull Corporation. In 1892 he moved to Ireland and worked for the Guinness Company. He died c.1929.

East Halton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Richard Coulson
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel, built right in the village centre, opened for worship in 1862 and closed in 1971.

For many years after closure it remained derelict, awaiting conversion or demolition.

The National Grid Reference for the site is TF 334 623.

Barry Barton, 1977

East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel has been converted into a dwelling. One bay at the western end of the building has been demolished - perhaps to create ground space for parking. (Many chapels were built on plots very little larger than the footprint of the building.)

May 2018

East Kirkby, Wesleyan methodist chapel
East Stockwith, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Back Street
East Stockwith, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Back Street
East Stockwith, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Back Street

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state :- 

i) The first chapel was opened on the 25.12.1819

ii) A second chapel was opened on the 10.10.1840

iii) The third chapel was opened on the 11.9.1870 in Back Street and the last service was held on the 4.7.1948 when the Society joined the ex WM's. The chapel is now standing derelict.

DB 29 December 2018

East Stockwith, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Back Street
Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The chapel on Boston Road (or Spilsby Road, New Leake?) was built in 1876. The last service in the building was held in 1964 and it was sold two years later.

The chapel was adapted for use as a garage/store for the adjacent house, ‘The Cottage’.

It is located at NGR TF 402 568 (Eastville)

Barry Barton, 1977

Eastville, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Eastville, St Jude
Eastville, St Jude
Eastville, St Jude

St Jude’s Mission Room, with war memorial and Women’s Institute, Eastville.

St Jude's was built in red brick in the 1860s.

Postcard, 1930s

Eastville, St Jude mission room, Women's Institute
Epworth, Kilham Memorial Methodist Chapel
Epworth, Kilham Memorial Methodist Chapel
Epworth, Kilham Memorial Methodist Chapel

Alexander Kilham (1762-1798) was born in Epworth, son of a linen weaver, and achieved fame as founder of the Methodist New Connexion.

This branch of the church joined others to form the United Methodist Church in 1907 which in turn became part of the one Methodist Church in 1932.

This chapel in High Street, opposite the Wesley Memorial Methodist Church, was built as a memorial to Kilham in 1860. It was converted for use as Epworth's Youth Centre in 1944.

The building is Grade II listed.

October 2016

 

Epworth, Kilham Methodist Chapel, Alexander Kilham, Epworth Youth Centre
Epworth, Wesley Memorial Methodist Church
Epworth, Wesley Memorial Methodist Church
Epworth, Wesley Memorial Methodist Church

This impressive building was built in 1889 by Charles Bell* on a spacious site along with school rooms, a manse and a caretaker's house.

This is the north front and main entrance to the church.

October 2016

* Charles Bell ARIBA (1846-1899) was born and educated in Grantham. His architectural practice was in London and he built more than 60 Methodist chapels.

Epworth, Wesley Methodist Memorial Church
Ewerby, Methodist Chapel
Ewerby, Methodist Chapel
Ewerby, Methodist Chapel

This Primitive Methodist chapel, built of distinctive local bricks, was opened in 1879 and closed in 1981.

It is now a dwelling known as ‘Chapel House’.

June 2017
Ewerby, Methodist chapel Primitive
Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Faldingworth, Methodist Church

The Methodist Chapel in Main Street, Faldingworth was built in 1897 on the site of the earlier chapel of 1828.

It was designed by Frederick Whittaker Dixon of Oldham, Lancashire (1854-1935). It closed and was sold in 2016.

June 2016

See other images of this church

Faldingworth, Methodist Church, Frederick Whittaker Dixon
Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Faldingworth, Methodist Church

A former Wesleyan Methodist chapel built in 1897. 

Image shows the Church in happier times when it took part in the West Lindsey Churches Festival. The last service before closure was on 14th June 2015.

DB 15 May 2011

Faldingworth, Methodist Church
Farlesthorpe, Methodist Church
Farlesthorpe, Methodist Church
Farlesthorpe, Methodist Church

This former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel opened in 1931 - surprsingly the first chapel in the village -  and closed in 1967.

September 2018

Farlesthorpe, Methodist Chapel
Fenton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fenton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fenton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former Methodist Chapel on Lincoln Road, now the home of Stamar Electronics Ltd.

http://stamar.co.uk/about 

Chapel founded 1831 and closed 1967.

DB 19 June 2018 

Fenton (West Lindsey), Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Stamar Electronics, church, image
Fillingham, Methodist Chapel
Fillingham, Methodist Chapel
Fillingham, Methodist Chapel

The former chapel (now a house named ‘Pateley’) in Chapel Road was built in 1859 or 1864.

The last service was held in October 1967.

May 2011

Fillingham, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel
Firsby, Methodist Chapel

Firsby’s Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Fendyke Road opened in 1903.

July 2016

Firsby, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Fishtoft, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fishtoft, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fishtoft, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The first Wesleyan Methodist chapel in the village was built in 1842.

The second one, shown in this photograph, was erected in Gaysfield Road and remained in active use until the present century.

It is located at NGR TF 364 419

Barry Barton, 1979

Fishtoft, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fiskerton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fiskerton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fiskerton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Chapel Road was built in 1839 in gault brick and converted into a house with new windows in 1967.

The defaced plaque is still there on the gable end to the left (not visible in this photograph).

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Fiskerton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, gault brick
Fleet, Baptist Church
Fleet, Baptist Church
Fleet, Baptist Church

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states "Here is a General Baptist chapel, founded in 1681, and rebuilt in 1876"

The chapel is on the right in this image with the schoolroom building on the left.

A matching exterior front was constructed to the schoolroom which is of earlier date.

DB 1 May 2010

Fleet, Baptist Church, schoolroom
Fleet, Baptist Church
Fleet, Baptist Church
Fleet, Baptist Church

Looking towards the front of the church from the balcony.

Flower Festival in progress. 

DB 1 May 2010

Fleet,
Freiston Ings, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Freiston Ings, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Freiston Ings, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyans opened this chapel in 1865 and it continued as a place of worship until October 1962.

The building was sold in 1965 and for many years it served as a store shed for Huskisson’s (Transport) Ltd

It is located at NGR TF 367 476

Barry Barton, 1977

Freiston, Ings Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Freiston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Freiston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Freiston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel in Church View was erected in 1866. The last service was held in 1962.

After sale in 1966 it was converted into a house known as ‘The Old Chapel’

It is located at NGR TF 377 438

Barry Barton, 1978

Freiston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This early chapel was built on Dicken Hill Road in 1836 and opened the following year.

The final service was held in February 1978 and it was later demolished with the site being incorporated into the adjacent field.

It is located at NGR TF 432 571

Barry Barton, 1977

Friskney, Fen Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The main Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel Lane (off the Friskney Eaudyke). A plaque above the doorway is inscribed "Wesleyan Centenary Chapel 1839".

A single storey Sunday School Building was added to the right of the Chapel (as viewed in the photograph) in 1951. It ceased to be used as a chapel in 2006.

Postcard c1940?

Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Known as Centenary Chapel, this place of worship in Chapel Lane was opened in 1839 with 360 'sittings'.

An extension for the Sunday School was built in 1951.

It listed Grade II* and is located at NGR TF 472 558.

Barry Barton, 1978


Friskney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frith Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frith Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frith Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel was built in 1822 at the north end of Tattershall Road.

It closed in c.1924, was sold the following year and was used as a store shed.

It is located at NGR TF 312 469 in Frithville parish.

Barry Barton, 1978
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (first)
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (first)
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (first)

This early chapel, known as ‘Mount Pleasant’, was built in 1838.

Despite the nearby replacement chapel in the village, it was not sold until 1939, being then converted into a bungalow.

It is located at NGR TF 317 507

Barry Barton, 1979

Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)

The former Wesleyan chapel in Frithville, opened in 1899, is now disused and marooned in the huge yard of the local agricultural engineer (R H Crawford).

August 2017

Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)
Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)

Frithville's second Wesleyan Methodist Chapel opened in Februray 1900.

The last service was held on Boxing Day 1993 and the chapel was sold three years later.

It is located at NGR TF 319 506

Barry Barton, 1977

Frithville, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Fulbeck, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Fulbeck, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Fulbeck, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"A Society was extant in 1820 and a chapel built, in Washdyke Lane, in 1825.

It was restored in 1899 but closed in 1987.

It is now a double garage next to No.18 Washdyke Lane"

DB 29 May 2020

Fulbeck, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Church
Gainsborough, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel,
Gainsborough, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel,
Gainsborough, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel,

A second view of the chapel showing the date stone reading

"PRIMITIVE METHODIST 1910" 

DB 29 December 2018

Gainsborough, Ropery Road, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel

On the corner of Ropery Road and Mercer Road.

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state :- 

"Centenary Chapel, Ropery Road, was opened on the 23.3.1910 and the organ inaugurated on the 25.9.1915.

Extensive internal alterations occurred in 1994 which closed off the gallery and organ loft.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 38"

Unfortunately the chapel closed in 1999.

DB 29 December 2018

Gainsborough, Ropery Road, Centenary Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Friends Meeting House
Gainsborough, Friends Meeting House
Gainsborough, Friends Meeting House

This building is on Market Street and is "Dated 1704 to rear"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1168215 

DB 18 June 2018

Gainsborough, Friends Meeting House, Quacker
Gainsborough, Methodist Church
Gainsborough, Methodist Church
Gainsborough, Methodist Church

Gainsborough’s Methodist Church was built in 1968 on the site of the former Wesley Chapel in North Street.

It was known as St Stephen’s Methodist Church until 1999. The interior of the church was refurbished in 2006.

November 2017

Gainsborough, Methodist Church, St Stephen
Gainsborough, Methodist Church
Gainsborough, Methodist Church
Gainsborough, Methodist Church

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state :-

"Wesley chapel was opened on the 3.6 1804 in North Street/Spital Terrace and the Sunday school added in 1853.

A new organ was opened on the 13.9.1899

The last service was held on the 21.1.1962 when the Society joined with that at Trinity.

The new combined Society, named Central, worshiped at Trinity until the Wesley chapel had been demolished in 1966, the site cleared and a new church, St Stephen's, had been built.

The stonelaying for the new church had occurred in 1967 and the opening took place on the 5.4.1968.

St Stephen's is still in use with a membership of 75"

DB 29 December 2018

Gainsborough, Methodist Church, Saint Stephen's, Wesley chapel
Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was built in Beaumont Street in 1877. It is described by Pevsner as 'debased Frenchy-Italian'.

From the Album of Gainsboro’ Views published by Amcoats & Co, Booksellers, Stationers & Printers, Lord Street, Gainsborough, c.1900?

 

Gainsborough, Primitive Methodist chapel
Gainsborough, Salvation Army Citadel
Gainsborough, Salvation Army Citadel
Gainsborough, Salvation Army Citadel

Reported in the Gainsborough Standard on 19 December 2011 that 

"A NEWSPAPER report announcing the arrival of the Salvation Army in Gainsborough 125 years ago declared that, after parading through the town, church leaders ‘opened fire’ in the Albert Hall.

It was using the military language associated with the church whose officers wear uniform and are given army rankings.

It was on 28th November 1886 that the Salvation Army began Sunday services at the Albert Hall on Beaumont Street, which it had rented for six months.

https://www.gainsboroughstandard.co.uk/news/125-years-of-salvation-army-1-4061379 

DB 21 August 2018

Gainsborough, Salvation Army
Gainsborough, Unitarian Chapel
Gainsborough, Unitarian Chapel
Gainsborough, Unitarian Chapel

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 refers to a Unitarian Chapel

"the Unitarian chapel in Beaumont street, founded in 1688" with 200 sittings.

See also

http://www.gainsborough-united-reformed-church.org.uk/public/separatist.php 

Its address is Trinity Street.

DB 5 March 2019

Gainsborough, Unitarian Chapel,Trinity Street
Gainsborough, United Reformed Church
Gainsborough, United Reformed Church
Gainsborough, United Reformed Church

Opened for worship on 9th June 1897 as a Congregational Church (Robinson Memorial Cong'l Church).

Became part of the United Reformed Church 5th October 1972.

Interesting and informative history available via the church website :-

http://www.gainsborough-united-reformed-church.org.uk/public/buildings.php 

DB 25 November 2017

Gainsborough, United Reformed Church, Church Street, Congregational
Gainsborough, United Reformed Church
Gainsborough, United Reformed Church
Gainsborough, United Reformed Church

Looking west towards the sanctuary area and organ.

Impressive organ 1903 by Foster & Andrews of Hull.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forster_and_Andrews

DB 18 June 2019

Gainsborough, United Reformed Church, Church Street, Congregational
Gainsborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gainsborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Beaumont Street and Roseway was built in 1804.

From the Album of Gainsboro’ Views published by Amcoats & Co, Booksellers, Stationers & Printers, Lord Street, Gainsborough, c.1900?


Gainsborough, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Garthorpe, Wesleyan Chapel
Garthorpe, Wesleyan Chapel
Garthorpe, Wesleyan Chapel

The Methodist chapel in Garthorpe was enlarged in 1883 and an adjoining Sunday School (on the left) was built in 1888.

The chapel closed in 2010 and has recently been for sale.

2011


Garthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gedney Drove End, Methodist Chapel
Gedney Drove End, Methodist Chapel
Gedney Drove End, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel on Marsh Road was opened in 1885 and closed in the early 1990s.

July 2019

Gedney Drove End, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gedney Hill, Baptist Church
Gedney Hill, Baptist Church
Gedney Hill, Baptist Church

The chapel on Hillgate was opened for worship by the General Baptists in 1883. It was sold in 2010 and has since been converted for domestic use.

September 2017

Gedney Hill, Baptist chapel church
Gelston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gelston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gelston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"The Wesleyan chapel was built in 1839, closed in 1958, and is now a private residence"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelston,_Lincolnshire 

DB 23 July 2018 

Gelston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gipsey Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gipsey Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Gipsey Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Boston Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson October 1996 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

i) Bethel chapel was opened on the 4.6.1854 in Leagate Road just north of Newham Lane. At various times it was known as Wildmore Fen, Asgarby Fen and Thornton-le-Fen Windmill! It was sold in 1910 and subsequently demolished.

ii) The present Leagate Road chapel stonelaying was held on the 8.7.1909 and the opening on the 28.10.1909. The classroom and toilets were opened on the 2.9.1978. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 14.  

DB 1 May 2019

Thornton le Fen, Gipsey Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

There is very little of the original structure of the former Primitive Methodist Chapel on the High Street surviving. It was built in 1876.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Glentham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Caenby Road also served, at a later date, as the Caenby Institute. It was built in 1911.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Glentham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
This chapel in Salem Street was opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in November 1878.
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Stated in "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Spalding Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Norman Leveritt September 1997 (Revised August 1988) that :-

"i) The first chapel was built in 1834.

ii) The second chapel, in Salem Street, was opened on the 7 11.1878 and is still in use with a membership of 17" 

Flower Festival in progress. 

DB 1 May 2017

Gosberton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Grantham, Baptist Church
Grantham, Baptist Church
Grantham, Baptist Church

Dated 1930 above the south door. 

Ordnance Survey 25" map published 1888 shows an earlier Baptist Chapel in the same location (Wharf Road). 

Lincolnshire Archives has records dating back to 1868.

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Grantham-Wharf-Road-Baptist-Church/617420.record?pt=S 

DB 4 December 2018

Grantham, Wharf Road, Baptist Chapel
Grantham, Cemetery Chapel
Grantham, Cemetery Chapel
Grantham, Cemetery Chapel

Referring to New Somerby, Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1885 states :-

"The cemetery for Grantham, Spittlegate, Houghton and Walton and Manthorpe-cum-Little Gonerby, which was opened on May 1st, 1857, is almost entirely in this district, and covers an area of 9 acres, 3 of which were added in 1872; the total cost was about £7,200, inclusive of two mortuary chapels connected by an archway.

The cemetery is under the control of a Burial board of 20 members, to which the parish of Grantham contributes 9 members, Spittlegate 7, and Little Gonerby 4.

The inhabitants of New Somerby have the right to bury here on payment of double fees"

The cemetery is on Harrowby Road.

DB 8 January 2019

Grantham Cemetery Chapel, Harrowby Road
Grantham, Cemetery Chapel
Grantham, Cemetery Chapel
Grantham, Cemetery Chapel

Another view of the chapel which is unfortunately no longer in use.

Grantham Crematorium is located a little further uphill to the east. 

DB 8 January 2019

Grantham Cemetery Chapel, Harrowby Road
Grantham, Congregational Church
Grantham, Congregational Church
Grantham, Congregational Church

Reported by the Grantham Journal that

"In 1972, many Congregational churches in England and Wales joined with Presbyterian Church to form the United Reformed Church.

In 1981, the URC united with the Re-formed Association of Churches of Christ and in 2000 the Congregational Union of Scotland.

In 2008, the Grantham congregation joined with that of the Central Methodist Church on Finkin Street, to form a Local Ecumenical Partnership, a joint United Reformed Church and Methodist Church called ChristChurch.

In 2011, the United Reformed Church building on Castlegate was sold to Alive Church, and the ChristChurch congregation moved to the former Central Methodist Church premises on Finkin Street, where it continues to flourish today"

https://www.granthamjournal.co.uk/news/grantham-civic-society-column-the-history-of-grantham-s-congregational-church-1-6708994/ 

The church is on Castlegate.

DB 2 July 2018

Grantham, Congregational Church, Alive Church
Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church
Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church
Grantham, Finkin Street Methodist Church

The Grantham Methodist Society was first recognised in 1788.

Its members initially met in a room above a coppersmith's workshop in Back Lane, but by the turn of the century the increasing membership meant that new premises were needed.

The first Methodist Chapel on Finkin Street was built in 1802 on the opposite side of the road to the present chapel.

By the mid-1830s the members had outgrown these premises and they purchased a vacant plot on Finkin Street upon which to build a larger chapel ...

The building contract for the Grantham chapel was awarded to Messrs Greasley and Stretton who obtained the stone from Parker's quarry at Heydour.

The foundation stone was laid in 1840 and the present chapel was formally opened in 1841"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1062522 

DB 2 July 2018

See other images of this church 

Grantham, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel, Finkin Street, Greasley and Stretton, Parker's quarry
Grantham, Kingdom Hall
Grantham, Kingdom Hall
Grantham, Kingdom Hall

This is one of several malthouses between Commercial Road and Brewery Hill shown on the OS 25 inch map published 1888.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malt_house 

It is now The Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses.

DB 3 June 2019

Grantham, Malting, Brewery Hill, Jehovah's Witness
Grantham, Methodist Church, Harrowby Lane
Grantham, Methodist Church, Harrowby Lane
Grantham, Methodist Church, Harrowby Lane

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

"GRANTHAM, SIGNAL ROAD WM 130/92.36. Opened on the 7.1.1932, using an old army hut, it closed on the 9.9.1950 and the materials used for Harrowby Lane Church (see below). 

GRANTHAM, HARROWBY LANE. - - 130/928366 A temporary building was opened on the 4.10.1951 at the corner of Harrowby Lane and Princess Drive. A permanent church was opened on the 14.12.1963 and is still in use with a membership of 98"

DB 9 March 2019

Grantham, Harrowby Lane, Methodist Church
Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Broad Street

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Shepherdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"Opened on the 4.7.1886 and the last service was held on the 5.7.1964.

It is still standing and in use by the Boy Scouts"

DB 9 March 2019

Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Commercial Road
Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Commercial Road
Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Commercial Road

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"Missioned and remissioned in 1817, 1824 and 1825 without lasting success.

It was once again remissioned in 1835 and this time a Society was formed.

Commercial Road chapel was opened on the 28.5.1837 and enlarged in 1876.

The last service was held on the 27.2.1966.

It is now in commercial use as 'The Electric Social Club""

Club now closed and building being converted into flats. 

DB 4 December 2018

Grantham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Commercial Road, Electric Social Club
Grantham, Salvation Army Citadel, London Road
Grantham, Salvation Army Citadel, London Road
Grantham, Salvation Army Citadel, London Road

Reported in the Grantham Journal 13 May 2015 that

"The Salvation Army has said farewell to its home in the Citadel on London Road in Grantham after 120 years of worship.

The local Salvation Army church has moved into its new home at The Old Barracks in Sandon Road.

The local organisation could no longer afford the upkeep of the Citadel, where it had been based since 1896, and said its final farewells at the weekend"

http://www.granthamjournal.co.uk/news/salvation-army-moves-into-new-grantham-home-1-6742930/ 

DB 12 December 2018

Grantham, Salvation Army Citadel, London Road
Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"i) The first chapel was built in 1836.

ii) The stonelaying for a second chapel, in Green Street, took place on the 9.10.1857 and the chapel opened on the 18.2.1858.

This chapel was demolished and a larger one built on the same site, in Green Street, with the stonelaying held on the 11.4.1873 and the chapel opened in mid October 1873.

The foundation stone for a new Sunday school, built across the road, was laid on the 22.2.1886.

Following the merger of the two Societies a new room was added to the chapel and opened on the 6.4.1990.

This was funded by the sale of the 1886 Sunday school site and also the Spring End ex-WM chapel.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 15"

DB 11 March 2019

Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Green Street
Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Sunday School
Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Sunday School
Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Sunday School

Former Sunday School directly across the road from the chapel in Green Street.

Date stone reads 

"PRIMITIVE METHODIST SUNDAY SCHOOLS 1886" 

Now a private house.

DB 11 March 2019

Great Gonerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Sunday School, Green Street
Great Ponton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Great Ponton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Great Ponton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

"i) Preaching commenced 1801 and a Society formed in 1803. An old chaff house was converted into a chapel in 1805.

ii) The foundation stone of the second chapel was laid on the 2.6.1898 and the chapel opened on the 29.9.1898. The last service was held on the 5.10.1975 and the chapel subsequently converted into a house".

Located on Dallygate at National Grid Reference SK927303.

The Primitive  Methodist Chapel, Mill Lane closed in the 1940's and has subsequently been demolished.

Geoff Swain Collection 9 May 1994

Great Ponton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, image
Great Steeping, Monksthorpe Baptist Church
Great Steeping, Monksthorpe Baptist Church
Great Steeping, Monksthorpe Baptist Church

This simple brick chapel was erected in 1701.  Originally thatched, the roof was tiled in 1847.

Regular worship ceased in the 1970s but occasional services are held.

It is owned by the National Trust.

Frank Robinson, 2010

Great Steeping, baptist chapel, national trust
Great Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Great Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Great Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A view of the 1868 chapel which closed 2010. 

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Spilsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Keith Guyler (Revised August 1998) states that :-

"The first chapel was erected in 1833 and was replaced on the same site by the present chapel in 1868. Toilets and a kitchen were installed in 1996. Sited in Main Road the chapel is still in use with a membership of 14"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 2002

Great Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Grimsby, Baptist Church, Laceby Road
Grimsby, Baptist Church, Laceby Road
Grimsby, Baptist Church, Laceby Road

"Baptist witness and worship in Grimsby began in 1822 with the first chapel and schoolroom being built and opened in 1824.

By 1826 a small group covenanting together became the first Baptist Church and called their first minister in that same year.

Numerical growth over the next 50 years led eventually to the building of the Baptist Tabernacle in 1876-1877 and this building remained in use until the 1950’s when the decision to relocate was made"

https://grimsbybaptistchurch.co.uk/church-history/ 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"The Baptist chapel, Freeman street, erected in 1868, is of red and grey brick, and will seat about 700.

The Baptist chapel, Victoria street is of red brick, and has two small towers with pinnacles and short spires : there are 1,100 sittings"

DB 9 February 2019

Grimsby, Baptist Church, Chapel, Laceby Road
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall

Grimsby Central Hall on Duncombe Street was opened in 1936 by the Methodist Church as a place of worship and community centre.

It has always been a concert venue too and still hosts a wide range of recitals and productions.

June 2017

Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall

Main Concert Hall set up ready for a classical concert.

DB 12 January 2019

Grimsby, Central Hall, Duncombe Street
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall
Grimsby, Central Hall

Main Concert Hall.

DB 12 January 2019

Grimsby, Central Hall, Duncombe Street
Grimsby, Central Hall, Fisherman's Chapel
Grimsby, Central Hall, Fisherman's Chapel
Grimsby, Central Hall, Fisherman's Chapel

"This Chapel was dedicated on the 22nd May 1966 "To the glory of God and in solemn remembrance of those who died at sea in the course of their duties while connected with this port"

http://www.grimsbycentralhall.org/images/documents/The_Fishermans_and_Seamans_Memorial_Chapel.pdf 

DB 12 January 2019

Grimsby, Central Hall, Duncombe Street, Fisherman's Chapel
Grimsby, Freeman Street, United Methodist
Grimsby, Freeman Street, United Methodist
Grimsby, Freeman Street, United Methodist

Colin Shepherdson states :-

"A temporary wooden building was erected in the 1860's and replaced by a permanent chapel opened on the 4.7.1869.

A Sunday school was added in 1870.

The chapel closed in 1933 and the congregation then joined that at Duncombe Street.

The chapel is now Rayner's furniture store" 

The furniture store has now given way to the Skills Hub.

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1896 states :-

"United Methodist (Free), Freeman street, Rev. William Locke Smith; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; thurs. 7 p.m"

DB 12 January 2019

Grimsby, United Methodist, Freeman Street
Grimsby, Salvation Army Citadel
Grimsby, Salvation Army Citadel
Grimsby, Salvation Army Citadel

The Salvation Army Citadel is on Duncombe Street.

June 2017

Grimsby, Salvation Army citadel
Grimsby, Spring Church, Upper Spring Street
Grimsby, Spring Church, Upper Spring Street
Grimsby, Spring Church, Upper Spring Street

Bounded by Victoria Street, Upper Spring Street and Upper Burgess Street. 

"It was not until 1849 that an effort to re-establish the cause was made by the Lincolnshire Association of Independent Churches and Ministers.

Eventually the Hull Association was able to begin services in the Mechanics’ Hall in 1859, and when Spring Church was built in 1861, nearly half its trustees were from Hull"

"Spring Church, by the Louth architect James Fowler (1828-92) cost £1,539, plus £450 for the land on Victoria Street"

http://www.chapelssociety.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/Cleethorpes-and-Grimsby.pdf 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1869 states :-

"The Congregational church, Upper Spring street, is of red brick in the Early English style, and has a tower with small spire on the north side : there are about 600 sittings" 

DB 12 January 2019

Grimsby, Spring Church, Upper Spring Street
Grimsby, Synagogue
Grimsby, Synagogue
Grimsby, Synagogue

Many Eastern European immigrants passed through Grimsby in the late 19th century. Some, however, stayed, and the Jewish population of the town increased.

The Sir Moses Montefiore Synagogue was consecrated in 1888 and was built ‘in a Byzantine style’ on land given by Edward Heneage MP.

Frank Robinson, December 2014

Grimsby, synagogue, Sir Moses Montefiore, Edward Heneage
Grimsby, Welholme Galleries
Grimsby, Welholme Galleries
Grimsby, Welholme Galleries

Built in 1907 by architects Bell, Withers and Meredith as a Congregational Church, it later became the Welholme Galleries.

Since 2004 it has been in use as a store by Grimsby Borough Council.

June 2017


Grimsby, Welholme Galleries, Congregational, Bell, Withers Meredith
Gunness, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gunness, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Gunness, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"i) The chapel, in Old Village Street, was built in 1824, replaced in 1929 and demolished in the late 1980's.

ii) The second chapel was built in Station Road. The foundation stone was laid on the 1.8.1928 and the chapel opened in January 1929.

A wooden schoolroom was added in 1959 and replaced with a portacabin in 1996.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 17"

Geoff Swain Collection 17 August 1993

Gunness, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, image
Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel
Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel
Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel

The chapel in Hackthorn opened in September 1869; the Sunday School was added in 1881.

The last service was in the 1980s and it is now used as an office by Hackthorn Estate.

December 2015

Hackthorn, Methodist Chapel
Hagnaby Lock, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hagnaby Lock, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hagnaby Lock, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

For many years this tiny chapel stood in derelict condition between a pair of houses.

It now serves as an annex to the bungalow on the adjoining site.

May 2018

Hagnaby, Methodist Chapel
Hagnaby Lock, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hagnaby Lock, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hagnaby Lock, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A chapel built for the Wesleyans in West Fen Road which held its first service in June 1859.

It closed for worship in April 1963 and was sold in 1966.

It is located at NGR TF 339 597 in East Kirkby parish.

Barry Barton, 1978
East Kirkby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, West Fen Road
Haltoft End, United Methodist Chapel
Haltoft End, United Methodist Chapel
Haltoft End, United Methodist Chapel

Situated in Oak House Lane, this chapel was erected in 1894 for the United Free Methodists.

The last service here took place in 1971 and the building was sold two years later.

The building was destroyed by fire in 1985 and the site is occupied by Frank Clayton & Son, blacksmiths.

It was located at NGR TF 369 451 (in Freiston parish)

(Note: The United Methodist Church was established in 1907 by the amalgamation of the Methodist New Connexion, Bible Christians and the United Free Methodist Church.)

Barry Barton, 1978

Freiston, Halltoft End United Free Methodist Chapel
Halton Holegate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Halton Holegate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Halton Holegate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The original chapel of 1837 was enlarged in 1937 and extensively refurbished in 1996.

It remained in use into the 1990s.

It is located at NGR TF 416 646.

Barry Barton, 1980


Halton Holegate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Harmston, Free Methodist Chapel, Blacksmith Lane
Harmston, Free Methodist Chapel, Blacksmith Lane
Harmston, Free Methodist Chapel, Blacksmith Lane

Former Methodist chapel now in use as a workshop.

"It was built in 1857 and closed in 1934. A defaced ashlar date tablet in the gable is inscribed Free Methodist but the date is unclear"

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Untitled/238685.record?ImageId=5449&pt=S 

DB 8 May 2018    

Harmston, Methodist, chapel
Harmston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lane
Harmston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lane
Harmston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Chapel Lane

"The first chapel was built in 1846 and replaced by a new chapel in 1873 which closed in 1973. It has been much altered and refenestrated"

http://www.heritagegateway.org.uk/Gateway/Results_Single.aspx?uid=MLI82023&resourceID=1006 

DB 8 May 2018   

Harmston, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan
Haven Bank, Methodist Chapel
Haven Bank, Methodist Chapel
Haven Bank, Methodist Chapel

A relatively modern chapel, built in 1936 with an extension to provide kitchen and toilets in 1991.

Still in use in the 1990s

It is located at NGR TF 241 514 in Wildmore parish

Barry Barton, 1978

Wildmore, Haven Bank Methodist Chapel
Hawthorn Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hawthorn Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hawthorn Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The first chapel on this site was built in 1831 and the second one, the current building, replaced it in 1887.

The chapel closed in 1985 and was demolished about five years later leaving a vacant grassy plot.

It is located at NGR TF 219 555 in Coningsby parish

Barry Barton, 1977

Coningsby, Hawthorn Hill Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Haxey, Methodist Chapel
Haxey, Methodist Chapel
Haxey, Methodist Chapel

The foundation stone for this chapel was laid in 1909.  A new organ was installed in 1949.

September 2010

Haxey, Methodist Chapel
Healing, Methodist Chapel
Healing, Methodist Chapel
Healing, Methodist Chapel

Built for the Wesleyan Methodists, the church on Low Road was designed by G F Pennington* and opened for worship in 1906.

September 2019

* G F Pennington, architect for Castleford Urban District Council, designed several churches in East and West Yorkshire.

Healing, Methodist Chapel
Heckington, Methodist Church, Church Street
Heckington, Methodist Church, Church Street
Heckington, Methodist Church, Church Street

"The first Wesleyan Methodist chapel in the village was built in 1809, but this was replaced by a new chapel in Saint Andrew's Street in 1835.

The building of the current church started in 1904 to designs by Nottingham-based architect Albert Edward Lambert.

It cost around £2,250 (equivalent to £222,476 in 2016) and was constructed by T. Barlow and Co. of Nottingham.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heckington_Methodist_Church 

DB 28 July 2018

Heckington, Methodist Church, Albert Edward Lambert, T. Barlow and Co.
Heckington, Parish Council Chambers, Saint Andrew’s Street
Heckington, Parish Council Chambers, Saint Andrew’s Street
Heckington, Parish Council Chambers, Saint Andrew’s Street

"Church House was actually built in 1835 as a Methodist Chapel, the second in the village.

During WWII it was commandeered as the NAAFI for the visiting military.

It then became the Reading Room, later a Sunday School then a nursery school and now has been purchased by the parish council to be used as offices and community information centre.

Until 1905 this street was called Chapel Street"

http://www.heckingtonvillagetrust.org.uk/a-walk-around-heckington.html 

The sign reads "Heckington Parish Council Chambers and Community Centre"

DB 28 July 2018

Heckington, Methodist Chapel, NAAFI, Reading Room, Sunday School, parish council
Heckington, Wesleyan Reform Chapel, Eastgate
Heckington, Wesleyan Reform Chapel, Eastgate
Heckington, Wesleyan Reform Chapel, Eastgate

"Wesleyan Reform Chapel. 1852"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1061806 

DB 14 July 2018

Heckington, Wesleyan Reform Chapel
Heighington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Heighington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Heighington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"Methodist chapel. 1815"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1062547

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) it is stated that :-

"A Society was formed in 1815 and worshipped in a barn, now converted into a house behind houses in Chapel Lane.

A chapel was erected, or acquired, in 1820, nearly opposite the present chapel, and now in use as a Sunday school.

A new chapel, in Station Road at its junction with Chapel Lane, was erected in 1848/9.

In 1906 a porch was added and the chapel re-pewed.

A Grade II listed building it is still in use with a membership of 34" 

Chapel has now closed to worship and the building is occupied by Skeet Print a print management company.

DB 26 August 2020

Heighington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, Skeet Print
Helpringham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Helpringham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Helpringham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This was the second chapel built for the Primitive Methodists on this site on the Green. It cost £350 and was dedicated in 1883.

June 2017

Helpringham, Primitive Methodist chapel
Hemingby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hemingby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hemingby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"Wesleyan Methodist chapel. 1859"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1360002 

"The first chapel was built in 1797 in Chapel Lane; it was replaced by a new chapel on a different site in Chapel Lane in 1859. The chapel closed in 1977"

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Hemingby-Chapel--Wesleyan-Methodist-/1098886.record?pt=S 

DB 3 September 2018

Hemingby, Wesleyan, Methodist Chapel, church, image
Hibaldstow, Methodist Chapel
Hibaldstow, Methodist Chapel
Hibaldstow, Methodist Chapel

Former United Methodist Chapel on East Street.

The church's website (16 September 2020) states "Hibaldstow chapel was built in 1865, and is a small, friendly chapel, which is warm and inviting"

https://bartonbriggmethodist.org.uk/hibaldstow/  

Geoff Swain Collection 18 October 1993

Hibaldstow, United Methodist Church, Chapel
Hilldyke, Long Hedges Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hilldyke, Long Hedges Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hilldyke, Long Hedges Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Also known as Boston East Methodist Chapel, this building was erected in 1867.

The last service took place in January 1965 and the building was sold later that year. It still stands in the grounds of the bungalow ‘Springfields’

It is located at NGR TF 347 468 in Fishtoft parish.

Barry Barton, 1979

Fishtoft, Hilldyke Long Hedges Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Holbeach Drove, Methodist Church
Holbeach Drove, Methodist Church
Holbeach Drove, Methodist Church

This small chapel was opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in February 1833 and remains in use.

September 2017

Holbeach Drove, Methodist chapel Wesleyan
Holbeach St Marks
Holbeach St Marks
Holbeach St Marks

The Methodist Chapel here was built for the Wesleyans in 1898.

July 2019

Holbeach St Mark, Wesleyan chapel church
Holbeach, Cemetery Chapels
Holbeach, Cemetery Chapels
Holbeach, Cemetery Chapels

"Church of England and Non-Conformist Cemetery Chapels, now Eecumenical cemetery chapel and store-room. 1854"

"2 single storey chapels divided by tall pointed archway crowned with tower with 4 stage diagonal buttresses with upper gablets running into ornate corner pinnacles"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1064493

See also Holbeach Cemetery Chapels Trust :-

http://www.holbeachcemeterychapels.org.uk/ 

Peter Kirk Collection, 3 April 1999

Holbeach, Cemetery, Chapels
Horncastle, Congregational Chapel
Horncastle, Congregational Chapel
Horncastle, Congregational Chapel

"Congregational chapel and attached Sunday School. 1821, 1874. C20"

"Chapel interior with gallery of 1821 intact"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1251763 

Located on the east side of Queen Street. 

DB 18 July 2019

Horncastle, Congregational Chapel
Horncastle, Congregational Chapel attached Sunday School
Horncastle, Congregational Chapel attached Sunday School
Horncastle, Congregational Chapel attached Sunday School

Attached Sunday School to the rear of the chapel.

DB 18 July 2019

Horncastle, Congregational Chapel attached Sunday School
Horncastle, Methodist Church
Horncastle, Methodist Church
Horncastle, Methodist Church

The church website states :-

"The first Wesleyan Methodist chapel was built in 1786 in the district known as The Wong or Cagthorpe. It was replaced by a new chapel on the same site in 1806.

In 1837 a new chapel was built on Queen Street, which was in turn replaced by a new chapel on the same site in 1870. This chapel was found to be unsafe and closed in 1962.

It was replaced on the same site by the present chapel which opened in 1965. (During the re-building of the Queen Street premises, 1962-1965, the congregation worshipped at Holy Trinity Anglican Church)"

A commemoration stone was laid 9th January 1965.

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 lists the previous chapel on this site:-

"the Wesleyan chapel, Queen street, is of red brick with stone dressings, erected in 1870, and seating 1,000 ; a fine organ was added in 1885"

DB 18 July 2019

Horncastle, Methodist Church, Queen Street
Horncastle, Methodist Church
Horncastle, Methodist Church
Horncastle, Methodist Church

Looking towards the front of the church.

DB 31 August 2019

Horncastle, Methodist Church, Queen Street
Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Prospect Street
Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Prospect Street
Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Prospect Street

The former Primitive Methodist chapel at the end of Prospect Street close to West Street was opened in 1854 and closed in 1961.

It was the third Primitive Methodist chapel to be built in the town.

April 2014

Horncastle, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Howsham, Methodist Chapel
Howsham, Methodist Chapel
Howsham, Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist chapel on High Street (B1434) was built in 1838 and extensively restored in 1883. It continued in use by the village's Methodist community until c.2000.

August 2018

Howsham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Howsham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Howsham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Howsham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel and School Room.

Now the village hall. 

DB 17 June 2018 

Howsham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel and School Room
Hubbert's Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Hubbert's Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Hubbert's Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states "There is a Primitive Methodist chapel at Hubbert's Bridge, built in 1871, and a Wesleyan chapel in Frampton Village"

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Boston Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson October 1996 (Revised August 1998) states :-

"The foundation stone for the Station Road chapel was laid on the 22.5.1871 and the foundation stone for an extension on the 19.8.1879.

The chapel interior was reversed, the front entrance was closed, and a new porch, kitchen and toilets were added and the remodelled building reopened on the 20.5.1978.

The last service was held on the 22.6.1997, when the membership stood at 10, and the chapel put up for sale, later the same year.

It was sold in June 1998 for conversion into a dwelling"

DB 21 September 2020  

Frampton, Hubbert's Bridge, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, image
Hundleby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hundleby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Hundleby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Spilsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Keith Guyler (Revised August 1998) states that :-

"i) A Society was formed in 1770 and a house registered for worship in 1775. The first chapel was opened in February 1834.

ii) The second chapel, in Main Street, was opened on the 26.7.1871. The last service was held on the 3.9.1995 and was put up for sale in 1996. It is currently still up for sale but in the mean time is let as a temporary store"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 2002

Hundleby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Huttoft, Methodist Chapel
Huttoft, Methodist Chapel
Huttoft, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodists built this chapel on Sutton Road in 1857. A Sunday school was added in matching style a few years later (to the left in the photo).

In the recent past the building has suffered structural problems and it is no longer in use. The local Methodist community now hold services in the village hall.

September 2018

Huttoft, Methodist Church
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This chapel in Pelham Road was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1911, replacing an earlier one on the same site built in 1856.

Two other Methodist societies in the village joined the local congregation to form a new society here in 1965.

Undated postcard

Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Immingham’s current Methodist chapel (Trinity Methodist Church) was built for the Primitive Methodists and opened in 1911. The hall alongside was built in 1966.

September 2019

Immingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Immingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This colourful chapel by the roundabout at the corner of Bluestone Lane and Pelham Road was built in 1883 for the Wesleyan Methodists and was last used for worship in 1965.

September 2019

Immingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel

The former Free United Methodist Chapel was built in 1854 and remained in use until the 1950s. It is now a house with changed fenestration.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Ingham, Free Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel on The Green is now Chapel House. It was built 1838 and converted to a house in the 1960s.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011


Ingham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This is possibly the Sunday School of the former Wesleyan Chapel, built 1836. It is now a community hall.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011


Ingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingoldsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingoldsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ingoldsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former chapel in Chapel Lane is now a private house. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Grantham Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Allen G Griffin October 1996 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that

"The chapel was erected in 1863, and can be found along a public footpath off Chapel Lane and behind some modern bungalows.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 3"

DB 18 February 2019

Ingoldsby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Irby In The Marsh, Irby & Bratoft Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Irby In The Marsh, Irby & Bratoft Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Irby In The Marsh, Irby & Bratoft Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Alford, Skegness & Wainfleet Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson July 1998 states :-

"i) The first chapel (Irby-in-the-Marsh Wesleyan) was erected in 1838, closed in 1889 and since demolished.

ii) The second chapel (Irby & Bratoft Wesleyan) was opened on the 3.11.1889 in Pinfold Lane, Irby. A kitchen and toilets were added in 1963. The chapel is still with a membership of 8"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 2002

Irby In The Marsh, Irby & Bratoft Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, image
Irby In The Marsh, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Irby In The Marsh, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Irby In The Marsh, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Alford, Skegness & Wainfleet Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson July 1998 states :-

"The Wainfleet Road chapel was opened on the 29.3.1838 and closed on the 24.9.1933. It is now a farm building"

The date stone above the entrance appears to read "1837". 

Located at National Grid Reference TF474632.

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 2002

Irby In The Marsh, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, image
Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel was opened for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1861 and the Sunday School was added in 1885.

The chapel closed for worship in 1960.

September 2010

Keadby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Cotes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Cotes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Cotes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel was erected in 1863, enlarged in 1872 and further extended with a Sunday Schoolroom in 1891.

The last service took place in July 1971 and the building, sold in 1979, now serves as a store shed.

It is located at NGR TF 366612 in West Keal parish

Barry Barton, 1977

West Keal, Keal Cotes Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Cotes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Cotes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Cotes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Although long out of use as a chapel, generally neglected and partially covered in ivy, the building has - surprisingly - retained its original doors, windows and railings.

May 2018

West Keal, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keal Hill, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan chapel on the main road (A16) between West Keal and East Keal was built at a cost of £700 in 1862 and extended with a Sunday School in 1908.

The final service was in January 1972 and the building was sold for £1700 in 1976.

It was subsequently demolished but the chapel’s boundary wall and railings survive.

It is located at NGR TF 371 634 in East Keal parish

Barry Barton, 1976

East Keal, Keal Hill Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Keelby, Methodist Chapel
Keelby, Methodist Chapel
Keelby, Methodist Chapel

This chapel in Yarborough Road was the third to be built by the Wesleyans in Keelby.

It was designed by Pearson Bellamy of Lincoln and was opened in 1867. It was enlarged in 1897.

July 2014

Keelby, Methodist Chapel, Pearson Bellamy, Wesleyan
Kirkby Green, Wesley Reform Union Chapel (Site of)
Kirkby Green, Wesley Reform Union Chapel (Site of)
Kirkby Green, Wesley Reform Union Chapel (Site of)

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :- 

"The Wesley Reform Union had a chapel in that part of Scopwick which was also known as KIRKBY GREEN.

The chapel was opened on the 13.7.1856 in Long Row, more commonly called Bedlam Row, and the last service held on the 23.10.1921.

The chapel was later convened into a wash house for the rest of the Row which was later demolished and the site is now occupied by the Braemer Mobile Home Park"

DB 2020 

Kirkby Green, Wesley Reform Union Chapel, Braemer
Kirkby on Bain, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Kirkby on Bain, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Kirkby on Bain, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A rented preaching place was opened on the 15.1.1853 and their own chapel, in the High Street, was opened on the 1.10.1871.

The last service was held on the 19.12.1976 and the chapel put up for sale in 1977.

The chapel is now in use as a store shed"

A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Horncastle & Bardney Circuit Past And Present Prepared By Colin Shepherdson Anthony E G Whiting September 1997  

DB 26 January 2019

Kirkby on Bain, Primitive Methodist, Chapel
Kirkstead, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Mill Lane
Kirkstead, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Mill Lane
Kirkstead, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Mill Lane

"The Mill Lane chapel was built in 1834 and closed in 1952.

Permission to sell was given in October 1953 and the chapel is now boarded up and derelict"

From "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Coningsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised July 1998).

DB 26 January 2019

Kirkstead, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Mill Lane
Kirmington, Methodist Chapel
Kirmington, Methodist Chapel
Kirmington, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel on High Street opened for worship in 1885 and held its last service in 1976.

September 2019

Kirmington,
Kirton in Holland, Chapel
Kirton in Holland, Chapel
Kirton in Holland, Chapel

Kirton's Methodist Chapel is on the west side of the main street in the centre of the village.

Pale rock-faced stone has been used on the facade facing the street; the rest of the building is constructed in less fashionable local red  brick.

September 2011

Kirton in Holland, chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel

Kirton Holme is a secondary settlement in the extreme northwest corner of the parish, approximately 3 miles from the village centre.

The Methodist Church is a short distance from the A52.

This is the original chapel built in 1820; it became a Sunday schoolroom when the replacement chapel was constructed alongside in 1903. 

September 2011

Kirton in Holland, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel
Kirton Holme, Methodist Chapel

The pair of buildings on Kirton Holme Road, a short distance from the A52 and about 3.5 miles north-west of Kirton, were built for the Primitive Methodists. This, the second chapel, was opened in 1903 to the left (south) of the first one.

The Methodists held their last service here in 1962 and the buildings were sold to the Anglican Church for £800. Two years later, after refurbishment, Christ Church CE church opened in the buildings. (Prior to this the Anglicans had worshipped in a timber mission room.)

September 2011

Kirton in Holland,
Kirton in Lindsey, Methodist Church
Kirton in Lindsey, Methodist Church
Kirton in Lindsey, Methodist Church

The Wesleyan Methodist Church in West Street opened in 1840 and was enlarged in 1875.

June 2013

See other images of this church

Kirton Lindsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Grimsby & Cleethorpes Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 it is stated that :- 

"A chapel was erected in Caistor Road in 1839. It was rebuilt and enlarged in 1877.

The last service was held on the 20.11.1956 and the chapel sold in 1961.

For many years it was used as a County Council Youth Club but is now boarded up"

Now used as 1st Laceby Scout Group Headquarters.

DB 8 February 2020

Laceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Grimsby & Cleethorpes Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 it is stated that :-

"i) Services commenced in 1753 and a Society formed in 1769. The first chapel was built in 1810.

ii) A larger chapel was erected in New Chapel Lane, with the stone laying occurring on the 21.2.1837 and the opening on the 15.6.1837.

Another even larger chapel facing the High Street and backing on to the old one, which continued in use as a Sunday school, was opened on the 13.1.1853.

In May 1971 the chapel was reopened following internal alterations.

The premises continue in use with a membership of 35"

Image shows the 1837 chapel which was latterly used as a Sunday School. Unfortunately the chapel is now closed and has been converted into a private house. 

DB 8 February 2020

Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Grimsby & Cleethorpes Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 it is stated that :-

"i) Services commenced in 1753 and a Society formed in 1769. The first chapel was built in 1810.

ii) A larger chapel was erected in New Chapel Lane, with the stone laying occurring on the 21.2.1837 and the opening on the 15.6.1837.

Another even larger chapel facing the High Street and backing on to the old one, which continued in use as a Sunday school, was opened on the 13.1.1853.

In May 1971 the chapel was reopened following internal alterations.

The premises continue in use with a membership of 35"

Image shows the 1853 chapel. Unfortunately the chapel is now closed and has been converted into a private house. 

DB 8 February 2020

Laceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lade Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lade Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lade Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Erected on Boston Road between Rose Cottage and farm buildings, this chapel was in use from 1871 to 1935.

After sale of the building in 1937 it was converted to a store shed for the adjacent farm.

It is located at NGR TF 396 544 in Old Leake parish

Barry Barton, 1980

Old Leake, Lade Bank, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langrick Ferry, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langrick Ferry, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langrick Ferry, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The new chapel, opened in 1868, was immediately across the road from its predecessor (1861-68).

The building ceased to be used as a chapel in 1990 and was sold three years later, before conversion to a store shed.

It is located at NGR TF 266 476 in Holland Fen with Brothertoft parish.

Barry Barton, 1980

Brothertoft, Langrick Ferry Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langrick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langrick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langrick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Also known as Langriville, this chapel in Armtree Road opened in 1857.

The last service was held in 1972 and it was sold with planning permission for domestic conversion in 1976.

It is located at NGR TF 266 485 in Langriville parish.

Barry Barton, 1978

Langriville, Langrick Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Langworth, Methodist Chapel
Langworth, Methodist Chapel
Langworth, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on Scothern Road was built in 1819, probably as a partial rebuild on the site of an earlier chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Langworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lea, Methodist Church
Lea, Methodist Church
Lea, Methodist Church

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Gainsborough Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Jim English March 1998 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"An old cottage, off Gainsborough Road, was converted into a chapel and opened on the 10.11.1951.

A metal schoolroom was added in 1958.

A kitchen was built between the chapel and the schoolroom in 1966, with the old kitchen being converted into a vestry.

An electric organ was installed in 1974 and the chapel is still in use with a membership of 19"

DB 5 March 2019

Lea, Methodist Church, chapel
Leadenham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leadenham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leadenham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 (Revised October 2001) it is stated that :-

"A dwelling house was licensed for worship in 1822 and a chapel opened on the 10.10.1841.

The last service was held on the 3.1.1965 and almost immediately the chapel was put up for sale.

It has since been converted into two houses, numbers 27 & 29 High Street"

DB 25 March 2019

Leadenham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leasingham, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel, Chapel Lane
Leasingham, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel, Chapel Lane
Leasingham, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel, Chapel Lane

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"The Wesleyan Reform Union have a chapel in Chapel Lane. The foundation stone of the present chapel was laid on the 22.4.1967, on the site of an earlier one erected in the 1850's.)"

The chapel is now closed and is being advertised for sale as a residential conversion. 

DB 16 July 2019 

Leasingham, Methodist, Chapel, Wesleyan Reform Union
Legbourne, Methodist Chapel
Legbourne, Methodist Chapel
Legbourne, Methodist Chapel

There has been a Primitive Methodist chapel on this site since the 1830s. The present building, the second, was opened in 1892 and closed in 1983.

July 2019

Legbourne, Primitive Methodist Chapel Church
Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Methodist Chapel
Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Methodist Chapel
Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Methodist Chapel

Former Free United Methodist Chapel on Bleasby Moor (in the parish of Legsby) was built in 1870 and converted into a house about 1970.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Legsby, Bleasby Moor, Free United Methodist Chapel
Leverton Outgate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leverton Outgate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leverton Outgate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A chapel which was used by the Wesleyan Methodists from March 1867 until January 1992.

The Sunday schoolroom was added in 1900.

After sale in 1995 the building was converted into a house.

It is located at NGR TF 420 481.

Barry Barton, 1978

Leverton, Outgate, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leverton with Benington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leverton with Benington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Leverton with Benington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Situated on the east side of the A52 between the two villages, this chapel was built in 1858.

The last service was held in July 1981 and the building was sold in 1985 and subsequently demolished. The site is now part of a field.

It is located at NGR TF 397 472 in Leverton parish.

Barry Barton, 1978

Leverton, with Benington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Bailgate Methodist Church
Lincoln, Bailgate Methodist Church
Lincoln, Bailgate Methodist Church

The Lincoln architects Bellamy & Hardy designed this chapel for the Wesleyan Methodists. It opened in June 1880, replacing an older building on nearby Newport.

The Sunday schoolroom was built in 1898 and major remodelling work took place in 1966, 1977 and 1985.

October 2017

Chapels, Lincoln Bailgate Wesleyan Methodist Church
Lincoln, Baptist Church, Croft Street
Lincoln, Baptist Church, Croft Street
Lincoln, Baptist Church, Croft Street

A modern successor to the Mint Street Baptist Chapel.

DB 20 June 2019 

Lincoln, Baptist Church
Lincoln, Baptist Chapel, Mint Street
Lincoln, Baptist Chapel, Mint Street
Lincoln, Baptist Chapel, Mint Street

The Italianate former Baptist Church at the southern end of Mint Street was built in 1870 by architects Drury and Mortimer.

It is currently in use an estate agents' office. There is a small enclosed graveyard to the rear.

Pearl Wheatley, 2016

Chapels, Mint Street Baptist Chapel, Drury and Mortimer
Lincoln, Birchwood Methodist Church
Lincoln, Birchwood Methodist Church
Lincoln, Birchwood Methodist Church

This church was built on Birchwood Avenue for the Methodist South Circuit and opened in September 1966.

It has been redubbed The Life Church and offers lively evangelical meetings.

November 2019

Chapels, Birchwood Methodist
Lincoln, Burton Road Methodist Church
Lincoln, Burton Road Methodist Church
Lincoln, Burton Road Methodist Church

Methodists first met in Burton Road as a congregation in 1891. The current chapel, on the east side of Burton Road between Mount Street and Mill Row, was opened in December 1904.

A hall for youth work was added in 1963 and major refurbishments of the sanctuary took place in 1972 and 1984.

November 2017

Chapels, Lincoln Burton Road Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Cemetery Chapels, Canwick Road
Lincoln, Cemetery Chapels, Canwick Road
Lincoln, Cemetery Chapels, Canwick Road

"Pair of former chapels, now disused.

1856. By Michael Drury.

Gothic Revival style with pointed arched windows and Geometrical tracery"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1388477  

Old cemetery laid out by Henry Goddard.

Peter Kirk Collection, 9 September 1990

Lincoln, Cemetery Chapels, Canwick Road, Michael Drury, Henry Goddard
Lincoln, Central Methodist Church
Lincoln, Central Methodist Church
Lincoln, Central Methodist Church

This church, with its adjoining Sunday school, theatre and meeting rooms, was built in 1905 by Howdill & Sons of Leeds in Baroque Revival style.

It is constructed in red brick with ashlar dressings, and slate roofs.

2012

See other images of this church
Chapels, Lincoln, Central Methodist Church, Howdill & Sons.
Lincoln, Christadelphian Hall
Lincoln, Christadelphian Hall
Lincoln, Christadelphian Hall

Now located on Princess Street.

The Directory Of The City of Lincoln 1919 published by JW Ruddock & Sons states 

"CHRISTADELPHIAN UPPER ROOM, EXCHANGE ARCADE:- Ministers, various ; Service, Sunday, 6.30 p.m. Tuesday evening at 8 p.m., meeting for advancement of Biblical knowledge (at Coffee Palace)"

DB 4 February 2019 

Lincoln Christadelphian Hall, Princess Street
Lincoln, Ermine United Reformed Church
Lincoln, Ermine United Reformed Church
Lincoln, Ermine United Reformed Church

This brick church was built on the Ermine estate at the corner of Sudbrooke Drive and Carlton Grove in the 1950s.

November 2017

Lincoln, Ermine United Reformed Church
Lincoln, Ermine West Methodist Church
Lincoln, Ermine West Methodist Church
Lincoln, Ermine West Methodist Church

Built in the early 1960's the church located on Trelawney Crescent has closed and is awaiting demolition.

https://thelincolnite.co.uk/2019/10/councillors-set-to-approve-ermine-church-demolition/ 

DB 19 November 2019

Lincoln, Ermine West Methodist Church Chapel
Lincoln, Free Methodist Chapel, Bracebridge
Lincoln, Free Methodist Chapel, Bracebridge
Lincoln, Free Methodist Chapel, Bracebridge

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) it is stated that :-

"A chapel was erected on the corner of Newark Road with Fairfax Street and opened on the 23.1.1870.

The last service was held on the 15.7.1951 when the Society merged with that at Lincoln Newark Road.

Much altered the chapel is still standing and is now in use as a shop"

DB 22 January 2019

Lincoln, Bracebridge, Free Methodist, Chapel
Lincoln, Gresham Street, Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, Gresham Street, Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, Gresham Street, Congregational Chapel

The former Congregational Church on Gresham Street was built in 1867 with the Sunday School added by 1905.

Later uses included a factory but by 2010 it housed a surgery, a dwelling and offices.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Chapels, Gresham Street, Congregational Church Chapel
Lincoln, Independent Chapel, Newland
Lincoln, Independent Chapel, Newland
Lincoln, Independent Chapel, Newland

The former Independent Chapel on Newland of 1840 is by James Fenton.

It was used as a British School in the 1870s and in 1876 Bellamy and Hardy built a Congregational chapel on the adjacent site.

Pearl Wheatley, 2016

Chapels, Lincoln Independent Chapel, James Fenton, Bellamy & Hardy
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) it is stated that :-

"A dual purpose school/chapel, standing well back from Monks Road in Walmer Road, was opened on the 24.6.1914.

The church, to a design by B. W. Blanchard, was eventually erected in Monks Road and in front of the old building.

The foundation stone was laid on the 21.10.1961 and the opening held on the 1.9.1962 - the old building continuing in use as a church hall.

The buildings are still in use with a membership of 70"

DB 26 February 2019

Lincoln, Monks Road, Wesleyan Methodist
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church

View of the sanctuary area.

DB 25 May 2019

Lincoln, Monks Road, Wesleyan Methodist
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church & Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church & Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Monks Road, Methodist Church & Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A second view of the Monks Road Church.

The 1914 Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, fronting on to Walmer Road, can be seen to the rear.

DB 26 February 2019

Lincoln, Monks Road, Wesleyan Methodist
Lincoln, Moorland Park Methodist Church, Skellingthorpe Road
Lincoln, Moorland Park Methodist Church, Skellingthorpe Road
Lincoln, Moorland Park Methodist Church, Skellingthorpe Road

Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) it is stated that :-

"A wooden hut, previously the Officers' Mess at Waddington, was erected as a chapel and opened on the 30.11.1924 in Skellingthorpe Road.

The foundation stone of a new chapel, adjacent to the wooden one, was laid on the 28.6.1952 and the chapel opened on the 11.4.1953.

An extension was opened on the 11.9.1982.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 84"

DB 31 July 2019

Lincoln, Moorland Park, Wesleyan, Methodist, Church, Chapel
Lincoln, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Newark Road
Lincoln, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Newark Road
Lincoln, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Newark Road

The impressive facade on Newark Road is built of pale brick laid in Flemish bond with fine arches in red brick and elaborate cornices created from moulded brick.

February 2019

Chapels,
Lincoln, Rasen Lane Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Rasen Lane Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, Rasen Lane Methodist Chapel

This chapel was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1863, replacing an earlier chapel built in 1850.

The last service was held in October 1957 and the site is now occupied by Rasen House.

undated photo

Chapels, Rasen Lane primitive methodists
Lincoln, Salvation Army Citadel, High Street
Lincoln, Salvation Army Citadel, High Street
Lincoln, Salvation Army Citadel, High Street

Rear view from Alfred Street.

Tower of St Peter at Gowts church visible beyond on the opposite side of High Street.

DB 4 February 2019

Lincoln, Salvation Army, Citadel, High Street
Lincoln, Seventh-day Adventist Church
Lincoln, Seventh-day Adventist Church
Lincoln, Seventh-day Adventist Church

Church building located 12-14 Rasen Lane.

"The denomination grew out of the Millerite movement in the United States during the mid-19th century and it was formally established in 1863"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh-day_Adventist_Church 

Not listed in Ruddock's Directory of Lincoln 1913.

DB 16 September 2019

Lincoln, Seventh-day Adventist Church
Lincoln, South Bar Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, South Bar Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, South Bar Congregational Chapel

This chapel was built for the Congregationalists in 1902. It ceased to be used as a regular place of worship in c.1991.

February 2019

 

Chapels, South Bar Congregational Chapel
Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church
Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church
Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church

This chapel was opened in 1888. (The schoolroom behind had opened two years earlier.) The tower was added in 1908/09.

The last service at St Catherine’s was in August 1977. It is now a heritage and cultural centre.

September 2014

See other images of this church 

Chapels, Lincoln, St Catherine Methodist Church
Lincoln, Swallowbeck Methodist Church
Lincoln, Swallowbeck Methodist Church
Lincoln, Swallowbeck Methodist Church

A Methodist society opened a chapel, built of corrugated iron, on this site on Newark Road in 1903. The present building opened in 1953.

March 2018

Chapels, North Hykeham Swallowbeck Methodist Church
Lincoln, TCM Baptist Church, High Street
Lincoln, TCM Baptist Church, High Street
Lincoln, TCM Baptist Church, High Street

Thomas Cooper Memorial Baptist Church.

This building dates from 1972 but the church has a long history in Lincoln.

https://www.tcmlincoln.co.uk/ourhistory.htm 

Previously based in St. Benedict's Square under what is now Marks & Spencer.

In the Directory of the City of Lincoln 1894 printed by Akrill, Ruddock & Keyworth the listing reads :-

"BAPTIST, St. Benedict's Square.-Minister, vacant; Services, Sunday, 10.30 a.m. and 6.0 p.m., Wednesday, 7.30 p.m. Mr. Morley, chapel-keeper"

In the Directory of the City of Lincoln 1919 published by JW Ruddock & Sons the entry reads

"THOMAS COOPER MEMORIAL Services, Sunday, 10.30 a.m. and 6 p.m. Thursday, 7 p.m. Minister, Rev. C. H. Homer, 76 Hewson Road"

DB 4 February 2019

Lincoln, Thomas Cooper Memorial Baptist Church, High Street, TCM
Lincoln, Trinity United Reformed Church, Garmston Street
Lincoln, Trinity United Reformed Church, Garmston Street
Lincoln, Trinity United Reformed Church, Garmston Street

Formerly St. Andrew's With Newland URC.

"The Church building was dedicated in 1963 and is of a modern design and construction, it being the former Presbyterian Church of St Andrew’s in Lincoln prior to the formation of the United Reformed Church in 1972 when the congregation joined with the Congregational Church on Newland. In July 2013"

http://www.lincolnurc.co.uk/about-us/ 

DB 26 February 2019 

Lincoln, Trinity United Reformed Church, Saint Andrew's With Newland
Lincoln, Unitarian Chapel
Lincoln, Unitarian Chapel
Lincoln, Unitarian Chapel

The Unitarian chapel was built on Lincoln's High Street in the early eighteenth century, altered in 1819, with late-nineteenth century additions.

It is built of brick, rendered, with stone dressings and hipped slate roof with a single stack.

The west front on High Street has a central stone porch with pediment and ball finials.

See other images of this church

Chapels, Unitarian chapel
Lincoln, Wesley Chapel, Clasketgate
Lincoln, Wesley Chapel, Clasketgate
Lincoln, Wesley Chapel, Clasketgate

The Wesleyan Chapel on Clasketgate was built in 1836 to cater for the growing popularity of Methodism in the City.

Designed by W A Nicholson in neo-classical style, and with a grand entrance portico, the chapel could seat 1400 people.

Affectionately known as ‘Big Wesley’, it was for many years the largest Wesleyan church in Lincoln.  It was closed in 1961 and demolished two years later.

Photograph from the book to mark the chapel's centenary, 1936.

Chapels, Lincoln, Big Wesley, Clasketgate
Lincoln, West Parade, Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, West Parade, Methodist Chapel
Lincoln, West Parade, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel at the corner of Gresham Street and West Parade was built about 1907. It was converted to dwellings in 2015.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Chapels, West Parade, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Linwood, Methodist Chapel
Linwood, Methodist Chapel
Linwood, Methodist Chapel

This 'tin' chapel (corrugated iron on a structural timber frame) was erected for the Primitive Methodists in 1923.

The last service was held in 1959 and it was sold in 1965 but now appears to be totally disused.

April 2017

Linwood, Methodist chapel
Lissington, Free Methodist Chapel
Lissington, Free Methodist Chapel
Lissington, Free Methodist Chapel

The Free Methodist Chapel in Lissington was built in 1863. It is believed to be the site of an earlier chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Lissington, Free Methodist Chapel
Little Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Little Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Little Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The foundation stone for this chapel was laid in 1896; it was the second chapel to be built on this site.

The chapel was last used for worship in 1971 and was sold in the expectation of conversion to a dwelling in 1976.

It is located at NGR TF 432 629

Barry Barton, 1979

Little Steeping, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Londonthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Londonthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Londonthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Grantham Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Allen G Griffin October 1996 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"i) The foundation stone for the first chapel, on the north side of High Road, was laid on the 28.11.1838.

The chapel is now a private house, "The Old Chapel".

ii) A new chapel was opened on the 26.8.1858.

iii) A third chapel was erected in 1888 and the last service was held in mid 1953"

Date stone of the Old Chapel pictured here reads 1838.  

DB 25 March 2019

Londonthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Long Bennington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Long Bennington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Long Bennington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Inscription above the door reads

"Wesleyan Chapel A.D.1864"

In his "List And Brief Details" 1988 Colin Shepherdson states 

"A Dissenter's Certificate was issued in 1786 and a chapel built in 1822/23.

The Main Road chapel was built in 1866 and the old chapel retained as a Sunday school.

The chapel is still in use" 

A Primitive Methodist Chapel, erected in 1838 and rebuilt in 1891, was situated just a little further along Main Road to the south.

DB 3 November 2018 

Long Bennington, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel
Louth, Centenary Methodist Church
Louth, Centenary Methodist Church
Louth, Centenary Methodist Church

Louth's sole surviving Methodist Chapel, in Eastgate, dates largely from 1835. The gallery and fixed seats were removed in an extensive remodelling project in the 1970s. It is Grade II listed.

October 2018

Louth, Centenary Eastgate Methodist Chruch
Louth, Eastgate Union Church former Baptist Chapel
Louth, Eastgate Union Church former Baptist Chapel
Louth, Eastgate Union Church former Baptist Chapel

Former Baptist Chapel now the Eastgate Union Church.

"As the name suggests we are a church that is a union of two others. This happened in 1919 and means that we are part Baptist and part URC"

https://eastgateunion.com/about-us/ 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states

"The Baptist chapel, Eastgate, erected in 1849, will seat 375; that in Northgate, built in 1802, will hold 500.

The Congregational chapel, in Cannon street, built in 1820, seats 500"

DB 7 March 2018

Louth, Eastgate Union Church, Baptist Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel
Louth, Independent Chapel

The Independent Chapel in Cannon Street was built 1828, superseding the former Countess of Huntingdon Chapel bought in 1800.

It was taken out of use 1928, first becoming a cinema, then offices.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Louth, Independent Chapel, Cannon Street, Countess of Huntingdon
Low Burnham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Low Burnham, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Low Burnham, Primitive Methodist Chapel

High and Low Burnham are hamlets in the parish of Haxey.

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"BURNHAM is a hamlet, consisting of High and Low Burnham, 2 miles north. Here is a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1872, and a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1848, but now disused"

The chapel closed in 1989. 

Geoff Swain Collection 10 April 1993

Haxey, Low Burnham, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church
Low Burnham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Low Burnham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Low Burnham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

High and Low Burnham are hamlets in the parish of Haxey.

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"BURNHAM is a hamlet, consisting of High and Low Burnham, 2 miles north. Here is a Primitive Methodist chapel, built in 1872, and a Wesleyan chapel, built in 1848, but now disused"

Chapel closed about 1875. 

Geoff Swain Collection 10 April 1993

Haxey, Low Burnham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist Chapel on Victoria Road was opened in October 1909.

It was damaged in the Second World War and also in the floods of January 1953.

After restoration, including the addition of the obtrusive entrance porch, it was renamed St Peter's.

September 2018

Mablethorpe, St Peter, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Alford, Skegness & Wainfleet Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson July 1998 it is stated that :-

"i) The foundation stone for a chapel was laid on the 7.8.1837.

Situated on the sea bank, due east of the present chapel and just around the corner from the High Street in what is now Quebec Road, it opened later the same year.

Following closure it was used as a store and was finally demolished in 1959.

ii) The Society moved from the above chapel in to new schoolrooms in Victoria Road on the 3.7.1887.

A chapel was added and opened on the 28.10.1909.

It was damaged in the Second World War and again in the 1953 floods.

It was restored, altered, subsequently renamed St Peter's and is still in use with a membership of 48" 

DB 29 June 2019 

 

Mablethorpe, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Mablethorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Alford, Skegness & Wainfleet Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson July 1998 it is stated that :-

"i) A chapel was opened in 1836 in Church Road.

ii) A new chapel was built in the High Street and opened on the 8.5.1868.

It was enlarged in 1881 and a schoolroom added and opened on the 5.11.1888.

It was further enlarged by the addition of vestries and a new transept - stonelaying on the 13.11.1913 and reopening on the 2.4.1914.

The last service was held on the 17.10.1965 and the Society joined with that at St Peter's.

The chapel was sold and converted into a printer's workshop and later used as a warehouse.

In 1996 it was converted into a number of dwellings"

DB 29 June 2019

Mablethorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Maltby le Marsh, Methodist Chapel
Maltby le Marsh, Methodist Chapel
Maltby le Marsh, Methodist Chapel

This former chapel was erected by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1873. The last service was held in May 1995 and it is now in use as the village hall.

September 2018

Maltby le Marsh, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel

A chapel was opened in Shop Hill by the Primitive Methodists in 1861.

It closed in the early 1940s and was sold in 1947.

The building stood derelict for at least 50 years. It is not clear whether the bungalow (called ‘The Old Chapel’) on the site incorporates any of the chapel.

It is located at NGR TF 278 611

Barry Barton, 1978

Mareham le Fen, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Mareham le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This Wesleyan Methodist chapel on the corner of Main Road and Chapel Lane was opened in 1891.

The building became unsafe and had to be demolished in 1994, after which time the congregation met in the schoolroom at the rear of the site.

undated postcard

Mareham le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Market Deeping, Primitive Methodist Chapel (Coronation Hall)
Market Deeping, Primitive Methodist Chapel (Coronation Hall)
Market Deeping, Primitive Methodist Chapel (Coronation Hall)

In "A List And Brief Details Of The Lincolnshire Chapels In The Stamford, Newark, Peterborough, Wisbech & Goole Circuits Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 it is stated that :-

"The foundation stone for a chapel, in Church Street, was laid on the 15.7.1876 and the last service was held on the 29.9.1940.

It was subsequently sold and in 1940 converted into "The Coronation Hall" and is still in use as such"

DB 11 November 2019

Market Deeping, Primitive Methodist, Chapel, Church, Coronation Hall
Market Rasen, Methodist Chapel
Market Rasen, Methodist Chapel
Market Rasen, Methodist Chapel

The Methodist Church at Market Rasen was built in 1863 at a cost of c.£4000.

Frank Robinson, 2010
Market Rasen, Methodist Church,
Market Rasen, Methodist Chapel
Market Rasen, Methodist Chapel
Market Rasen, Methodist Chapel

Looking back towards the rear of the chapel.

The entry in Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 reads :-

"Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel street, Rev. Thomas E. North (supt.) & Rev. Edmund H. G. Bryant; 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m.; thurs. 7 p.m"

DB 19 May 2019

Market Rasen, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel, church
Market Rasen, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Jameson Bridge Street
Market Rasen, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Jameson Bridge Street
Market Rasen, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Jameson Bridge Street

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1909 states :-

"Primitive Methodist, Jameson Bridge street, Rev. John Wilson, Superintendent; 11 a.m. & 6 p.m. ; wed. 7 p.m. winter; 7.15 p.m. summer"

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Market Rasen & Caistor Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Eileen H Mumby September 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"The Society was formed on the 19.5.1819 and in 1836 they purchased the old Jameson Bridge Street Wesleyan chapel which they reopened on the 14.5.1837.

The foundation stone for a new chapel, on the same site, was laid on the 4.7.1866 and the last service was held in mid 1940.

The chapel was sold in 1943 and is now in use as a Masonic Lodge"

DB 1 June 2019

Market Rasen, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Jameson Bridge Street
Market Rasen, United Methodist Chapel
Market Rasen, United Methodist Chapel
Market Rasen, United Methodist Chapel

This large chapel on the east side of Union Street was opened by the United Methodists in June 1861. It seated a congregation of 500.

The last service was held in 1963 and it has since been used for commercial purposes.

It is to be regretted that the facade on Union Street was altered by rendering and the insertion of a large doorway entrance.

May 2018



Market Rasen, United Methodist Chapel
Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel 1837, Mill Lane
Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel 1837, Mill Lane
Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel 1837, Mill Lane

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 it is stated that :-

"The first chapel was built in Mill Street in 1837.

It was replaced by the High Street chapel in 1879 and was used for a few years as a schoolroom.

It was subsequently convened in to, and is now in use as, a dwelling house called "Chapel House" 

A report " Nonconformist Chapels in North Kesteven" states

"the former Primitive chapel in Mill Lane in Martin had a pedimented raised gable added when the earlier building of 1837 was raised and remodelled in 1858" 

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Download/1586 

DB 5 April 2018

Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel 1879, High Street
Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel 1879, High Street
Martin by Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel 1879, High Street

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 it is stated that :-

"The foundation stone for the High Street chapel was laid on the 10.10.1878 and the chapel opened in 1879.

The foundation stone for the new Sunday school was laid on the 13 10 1887.

The chapel closed in 1988 and the buildings are now in commercial use by Majestic Crystal Ltd" 

https://www.majesticcrystal.co.uk 

DB 5 April 2018

Martin by Timberland, Methodist, Chapel, Majestic Crystal
Martin by Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street
Martin by Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street
Martin by Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 it is stated that :-

"i) The first chapel was erected in 1809.

ii) A second chapel was built in 1832.

iii) The third chapel, in High Street, was erected in 1860 and closed in 1936. It is now used as a village hall"

See also :-

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Download/1586 

DB 5 April 2018

Martin by Timberland, Wesleyan chapel, Church Hall
Marton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Marton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Marton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Gainsborough Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Jim English March 1998 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"A Society was formed in 1794 and a chapel erected in the High Street in 1814.

A schoolroom was added to the rear of the chapel in 1823 and further extended in 1964 by the addition of a kitchen and toilets.

It is still in use with a membership of 10"

DB 24 June 2020

Marton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Medge Hall, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Medge Hall, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Medge Hall, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Formerly in the parish of Thorne, West Riding of Yorkshire but now in Crowle following boundary changes in 1993.

Was in the Epworth and Crowle Methodist Circuit until the chapel closed in 1967.

Located at National Grid Reference SE748122.

Geoff Swain Collection 31 May 1994

Crowle, Medge Hall, Thorne, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, image
Medge Hall, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Interior
Medge Hall, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Interior
Medge Hall, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Interior

Interior of the chapel now in a ruinous condition.

Inscription on the end wall reads "THE LORD IS MY SHEPHERD". 

Geoff Swain Collection 31 May 1994

Crowle,
Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street
Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street
Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"i) The Society was formed on the 14.11.171. a house licensed in 1777 and a chapel built in 1796.

The site is not known and the chapel demolished with the opening of its successor.

ii) The new chapel was erected in Church Street in 1821 and a Sunday school added in 1838.

An organ chamber was added to the chapel in 1856 and a new schoolroom in 1869.

The chapel was repewed in 1876 and redesigned and renovated in 1955.

A new hall and kitchens were opened on the 17.8.1961 and a further two classrooms in 1970.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 59" 

DB 27 March 2019

Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street
Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street
Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street
Messingham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church Street

Detail of the new schoolroom added in 1869.

DB 27 March 2019

Messingham,
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (3rd Wesleyan), High Street
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (3rd Wesleyan), High Street
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (3rd Wesleyan), High Street
Third Chapel now occupied by Parkers Stores. 
 
"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-
 
"i) A Society was formed in 1801 and the first chapel erected in 1803.
 
ii) The second chapel was built in 1824.

iii) The third chapel was built in the High Street, on a site nearly opposite the present chapel, and opened on the 27.9.1840. A day school was built in 1858. The chapel still stands and is used as a store.

iv) The foundation stone for the present chapel, also in the High Street, was 11.7.1907 and the chapel opened on the 28.5.1908. The chapel is still in membership of 72"

DB 7 June 2018
Metheringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (4th Wesleyan)
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (4th Wesleyan)
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (4th Wesleyan)

This chapel opened in May 1908 and is still in use. It was the fourth Wesleyan Methodist chapel to be built in the village.

March 2016

Metheringham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Reform Union), People's Hall
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Reform Union), People's Hall
Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Reform Union), People's Hall

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"The Wesleyan Reform Union had a chapel in Middle Street known as the People's Hall.

Built in 1853, it closed in 1922 and is now a workshop"

DB 7 June 2018  

Metheringham, Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Reform Union), People's Hall
Middle Rasen, Methodist Church
Middle Rasen, Methodist Church
Middle Rasen, Methodist Church

The chapel sanctuary is to the right, the schoolroom to the left.

June 2018

Middle Rasen,
Minting, Methodist Chapel
Minting, Methodist Chapel
Minting, Methodist Chapel

This former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Mill Lane was built in 1892. It is now used as a tyre store.

Pearl Wheatley, 2013

Minting, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Moorby, Methodist Chapel
Moorby, Methodist Chapel
Moorby, Methodist Chapel

This modest building was opened as a chapel for the Wesleyan Methodists in 1840.

The last service was held in 1971 and the unrestored building is used as a store.

May 2018

Moorby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Morton by Bourne, Baptist Church
Morton by Bourne, Baptist Church
Morton by Bourne, Baptist Church

"New Day Baptist Church

There has been a Baptist Church in Morton since 1846. the present Church moved to its present location in 1876"

http://parishes.lincolnshire.gov.uk/MortonandHanthorpe/section.asp?catId=36238 

DB 20 August 2020

Morton by Bourne, Baptist Church, Chapel
Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel

A chapel was erected here in Fen Gate in 1812 and was later used as a Sunday School for the new chapel built in front of it in 1902.

September 2017

Moulton Chapel, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Marsh, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Marsh, Methodist Chapel
Moulton Marsh, Methodist Chapel

The chapel on Red Cow Drove, built in 1910, is the second Wesleyan Methodist chapel on this site. The last service was held in 1973.

July 2019

Moulton, Methodist Chapel, Red Cow Drove
Moulton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Moulton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Moulton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Pictured whilst participating in the annual South Holland Church Flower Festivals event. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Holbeach Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"A Society was formed in 1789 and a house registered for worship in 1795.

A chapel was erected, in Bell Lane, in 1830 and is still in use with a membership of 12"

DB 1 May 2010

Moulton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church

The Methodist Church in Navenby is well-positioned towards the north end of the village on the A607 Lincoln - Grantham road.

June 2015

See other images of this church


Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church
Navenby, Methodist Church

"This chapel, which still serves as a place of worship, was built in 1926 as a successor to a chapel in Chapel Lane which was built in 1839 to replace an earlier chapel of c.1802"

http://www.heritagegateway.org.uk/Gateway/Results_Single.aspx?uid=MLI97092&resourceID=1006 

DB 17 April 2018

Navenby, Methodist, Church, Chapel
Nettleham, Free Methodist Chapel
Nettleham, Free Methodist Chapel
Nettleham, Free Methodist Chapel

This is the site of a Baptist chapel, later used by a congregation of the Wesleyan Reform Union.

This society rebuilt the chapel (the current building) on the same site in 1863. The final service in the building was held in July 1959.

February 2018

Nettleham, Free Methodist Chapel
Nettleham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The first service for the Wesleyan Methodists in this building was held in November 1899.

The chapel was modernised and enlarged in 1969 and further remodelled in 1987.

February 2018

Nettleham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist Chapel in Church Street, Nettleton was built about 1860 and was still in use in the 1950s.

Originally there were four bays. The porch is still there behind the chapel.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Nettleton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Church Street, Nettleton was built 1848 with a Sunday School at the rear built in 1912.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A notice displayed inside the chapel states :-

"In 1796 Methodism, came to Nettleton. The Meetings were held in the houses of Henry Spring, Zechariah Featherstone & Robert Applebys. To perpetuate the cause Zechariah gave land for a Chapel and £30 towards its cost.

This chapel, built in 1800, enlarged in 1847, & in 1912 the schoolroom, and, other buildings were added.

The Primitive Methodist Chapel was built in 1858. Its lease expired in 1957 & a joint Society Meeting agreed to unite the two Societies & worship in this chapel which was renovated and reopened on 18 May 1957" 

DB 19 May 2019

Nettleton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The present building, in regular use for worship into the 1990s, is the second chapel on this site. The first was built in 1848; the second 1872.

It is located at NGR TF 247 551 in Wildmore parish.

Barry Barton, 1978
Wildmore, New York Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Coningsby Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised July 1998) it is stated that :-

"A chapel was built in 1848 on the corner of Dogdyke and Langrick Roads, although the official opening, by Mr C Richardson - the "Lincolnshire Trasher" didn't occur until the 11.2.1850.

It became unsafe and had to be demolished.

A new chapel was built on the same site and opened on the 19.9.1872 and is still in use with a membership of 9"

Other references refer to Charles Richardson as the "Lincolnshire Thrasher" a renowned Wesleyan evangelist.

Unfortunately the chapel has since closed and was purchased by auction July 2011.

DB 7 May 2019

Wildmore, New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New Holland, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel
New Holland, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel
New Holland, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) states :-

"i) A chapel was erected in 1858.

ii) A second chapel, also in Main Street, was erected in 1877. A new kitchen and toilets were constructed in 1974.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 14"

Unfortunately the chapel was subsequently closed in 2006. 

Geoff Swain Collection 28 August 1994

New Holland, Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel, church
New Leake, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New Leake, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New Leake, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel was built in Sibsey Road in 1838 and a schoolroom was added in 1848.

The building was sold in 1977 after the Methodists began a shared use arrangement with the Anglicans at St Jude’s parish church.

Methodist services in the parish came to an end in 1984.

The chapel building is now a private house, ‘The Old Chapel’; the schoolroom has been demolished.

It is located at NGR TF 402 573.

Barry Barton, 1978

New Leake, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
New York, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This fine building, at the junction of Dogdyke Road and Langrick Road, was opened as a Wesleyan Methodist chapel in September 1872.

It replaced an earlier building of 1848 which had become unsafe.

July 2017

New York, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Newton on Trent, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Newton on Trent, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Newton on Trent, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) states :-

"i) A Society was formed circa 1750 and the chapel built in 1790 or 1812 or 1828. Following the opening of the new chapel it was sold for £50.

ii) The foundation stone for a new chapel, in Dunham Road, was laid on the 15.7.1895 and the building opened on the 6.11.1895. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 5"

Following closure it was converted into a dwelling and sold in 2015.

Geoff Swain Collection 2 July 1993

Newton on Trent, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Normanby by Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Free Methodist Chapel

This large chapel at the corner of Chapel Lane was built for the Free Methodists in 1864 and later used by United Methodists.

It is Grade II listed and has been converted into a dwelling.

June 2017

Normanby By Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Normanby by Spital, Methodist Chapel

The former Non-Conformist Chapel in Front Street was built in 1813 and enlarged in 1825 and 1845. By 1856 it belonged to the Free Methodists; it closed in 1862.

Other chapels were built in the village but date stones on this one notes 1861 and 1867. There lies the mystery.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Normanby By Spital, Free Methodist Chapel
North Hykeham, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel Lane
North Hykeham, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel Lane
North Hykeham, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel Lane

Colin Sheperdson in his "Brief Details of Chapels in the Lincoln Circuits" Revised 2001 states :-

i) A house was licenced in April 1809 but the cause died out in 1815.

It was re-missioned in 1830 and a chapel opened on the 28.10.1838.

Following the opening of the new chapel it was subsequently converted in to two houses, now 7 & 8 Cross Lane.

ii) The foundation stone for a new chapel in Chapel Lane, was laid on the 8.8.1881.

Following modernisation and an extension it was reopened on the 13.5.1989 and is still in use with a membership of 71. 

DB 19 April 2018

North Hykeham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Kelsey, Methodist Chapel
North Kelsey, Methodist Chapel
North Kelsey, Methodist Chapel

The first Wesleyan Methodist chapel in North Kelsey was built in 1796, the second in 1848.

This in turn was replaced by the present building in Chapel Street in 1897.

May 2016

North Kelsey, Methodist chapel
North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This former Methodist Chapel (presumably for the Primitives) was rebuilt in 1856 in place of one 1837. It had originally had three bays; later it was used as the village post office.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

North Owersby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel

The former United Methodist Chapel in North Owersby was built 1881 and fell from use 1936.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

North Owersby, United Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Thornton Road was built in 1908 superseding one of 1856.It is now a domestic property.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

North Owersby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Scarle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Scarle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
North Scarle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A chapel opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1900 in High Street, now used as the parish hall.

October 2016

North Scarle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
North Somercotes, Methodist Chapel
North Somercotes, Methodist Chapel
North Somercotes, Methodist Chapel
The Methodist chapel in North Somercotes, originally opened by the Wesleyans.
North Somercotes, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Old Leake, Commonside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Old Leake, Commonside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Old Leake, Commonside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Built in 1815, this is one of the oldest surviving Methodist chapels in the area.

A Sunday schoolroom was added in 1839 and the chapel enlarged in 1871.

It is located at NGR TF 401 520.

Barry Barton, 1980

Old Leake, Commonside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Old Leake, Fold Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Old Leake, Fold Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Old Leake, Fold Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Primitive Methodists erected a chapel in 1839 and then built a new chapel behind it in 1881.

Closure occurred in 1946 and the buildings were sold the following year. Both former chapels are used as farm store sheds today.

They are located at NGR TF 405 518 in Fold Hill Road, Old Leake.

Barry Barton, 1978

Old Leake, Fold Hill Primitive Methodist Chapel
Old Somerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Old Somerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Old Somerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"A chapel was rented from circa 1891 but the Society built their own chapel, in Grantham Road, in 1900. It is now a small rebuilt cottage "The Old Chapel"".

DB 2 March 2020

Old Somerby, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Church
Old Woodhall, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Old Woodhall, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Old Woodhall, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"There is a Wesleyan chapel at Reeds Beck, built in 1850 and rebuilt in 1901, and seating 100 persons"

Now closed and being converted into a private house. 

DB 26 January 2019

Old Woodhall, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Church, Reeds Beck
Owmby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Owmby by Spital, Methodist Chapel
Owmby by Spital, Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel on Normanby Road, Owmby by Spital, was built in 1903 and in use as a doctor’s surgery when this photograph was taken.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Owmby by Spital, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Owston Ferry, Centenary Methodist Chapel
Owston Ferry, Centenary Methodist Chapel
Owston Ferry, Centenary Methodist Chapel

"Centenary Methodist chapel. 1837. Red brick, with front of red stock brick in Flemish bond, ashlar dressings. Concrete tile roof"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1049072

DB 21 August 2018

Owston Ferry, Centenary Methodist Church Chapel
Potterhanworth, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Potterhanworth, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Potterhanworth, Primitive Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 (Revised October 2001) it is stated that :-

"A chapel was erected in 1838, also in Barff Road being the last building on the left when leaving the village and adjacent to 'Southcote'.

The last service was held on the 8.10.1944 and the chapel is now boarded up and for sale, having been used as a store shed for many years" 

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Potterhanworth, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church, image
Potterhanworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Potterhanworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Potterhanworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The foundation stone for this chapel in Barff Road was laid in 1888. A hall for the Sunday School and community use was opened in 1962.

July 2011


Potterhanworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Quarrington, Rauceby Hospital Chapel  (Greylees)
Quarrington, Rauceby Hospital Chapel (Greylees)
Quarrington, Rauceby Hospital Chapel (Greylees)

"brick chapel (c 1900)"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1001471 

DB 20 August 2020 

Quarrington, Kesteven County Lunatic Asylum, Greylees, Rauceby Hospital, chapel
Raithby by Spilsby, Methodist Chapel
Raithby by Spilsby, Methodist Chapel
Raithby by Spilsby, Methodist Chapel

This is one of the most important chapels in Methodism and the oldest in Lincolnshire.

John Wesley himself opened the chapel above the stables of Raithby Hall in 1779.

It is a Grade I listed building.

July 2012

See other images of this church

Raithby By Spilsby, Methodist Chapel, John Wesley, Stables
Reepham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Reepham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Reepham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This Wesleyan Methodist chapel, on High Street at the corner of Chapel Lane, was opened in 1894.

July 2016

Reepham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Revesby Bridge, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Revesby Bridge, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Revesby Bridge, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

It is located at NGR TF 307 602 in Revesby parish.

Barry Barton, 1977


Revesby, Revesby Bridge, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Revesby, Sandy Bank, Methodist Chapel
Revesby, Sandy Bank, Methodist Chapel
Revesby, Sandy Bank, Methodist Chapel

A Wesleyan Methodist chapel was erected here in 1852 and replaced on the same site in 1953.

It remained open as a place of worship into the 21st century.

It is located at NGR TF 261 550 in corner of Revesby parish next to Wildmore.

Barry Barton, 1978

Revesby, Sandy Bank Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan
Revesby, Sandy Bank, Methodist Chapel
Revesby, Sandy Bank, Methodist Chapel
Revesby, Sandy Bank, Methodist Chapel

The former chapel has been adapted for residential use but all the external features have been retained.

May 2018

Coningsby, Sandy Bank methodist Chapel
Riby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, War Memorial
Riby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, War Memorial
Riby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, War Memorial

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Grimsby & Cleethorpes Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson it is stated that :-

"A Society was renting a preaching place in 1873 and the foundation stone for their own chapel was laid on Shrove Tuesday 1884 and opened on the 3.6.1884.

It closed on the 31.12.1958 and in 1966 was converted into a house, "Four Winds""

The war memorial was transferred to St Edmund's Church where it is displayed on the wall at the end of the south aisle.

DB 19 May 2019

Riby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Saint Edmund's Church, War memorial
Ropsley, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ropsley, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ropsley, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Former chapel now a private house.

"The chapel was built in 1837 and closed in 1989"

https://www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/upload/public/attachments/1028/ropsley_chapel.pdf

DB 6 August 2018

Ropsley, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Ruskington, Free Church, Chestnut Street
Ruskington, Free Church, Chestnut Street
Ruskington, Free Church, Chestnut Street

Zion Wesleyan Reform Methodist Chapel.

DB 21 August 2019

Ruskington, Free Church, Zion Wesleyan Reform Methodist Chapel, Chestnut Street
Ruskington, Methodist Church, Chapel Street
Ruskington, Methodist Church, Chapel Street
Ruskington, Methodist Church, Chapel Street

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :- 

i) A chapel "north of Town Street" was erected in 1833.

ii) A new chapel, in Chapel Street, was built in 1849.

The complex was replaced in 1958 by a new dual purpose hall on the same site, opened on the 18.9.1958, and which became the church with the opening of a new schoolroom in 1964.

It is still in use with a membership of 49.

DB 21 August 2019

Ruskington, Methodist Church
Saleby, Methodist Chapel
Saleby, Methodist Chapel
Saleby, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Saleby has been disused since it was last used for worship in 1984. It was built in 1855 and a schoolroom added in 1914.

September 2018

Saleby, Methodist Chapel
Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

By the end of the 19th century Saltfleet had chapels for three groups of non-conformists: the Wesleyan chapel, built in 1815, the Primitive chapel, from 1836 and the Free Methodist chapel, established in 1855.

Now only the one of 1815 remains with a porch added in 1867, set back from the main street behind an attractive garden.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1165896

Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel
Saltfleetby, Wesleyan Chapel

By the end of the 19th century Saltfleet had chapels for three groups of non-conformists: the Wesleyan chapel, built in 1815, the Primitive chapel, from 1836 and the Free Methodist chapel, established in 1855.

Now only the one of 1815 remains with a porch added in 1867, set back from the main street behind an attractive garden.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1165896

Jean Howard, August 2020

Saltfleet, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Saxilby, Godfrey Memorial Methodist Chapel
Saxilby, Godfrey Memorial Methodist Chapel
Saxilby, Godfrey Memorial Methodist Chapel

In his "Brief Details of Chapels in The Lincoln Circuits" Revised October 2001 Colin Shepherdson states :-

"The Godfrey Memorial Church, in the High Street, was opened on the 21.3.1940 on a site opposite the old Wesleyan chapel.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 66"

DB 19 June 2018 

Saxilby, Godfrey Memorial Methodist Chapel, church, image
Saxilby, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / Village Hall
Saxilby, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / Village Hall
Saxilby, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / Village Hall

In his "Brief Details of Chapels in The Lincoln Circuits" Revised October 2001 Colin Shepherdson states :-

Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel / Free Methodist Chapel / United Methodist Chapel

"i) A chapel opened on the 9.2.1851.

ii) A new chapel was opened in the High Street, at its junction with Syke Road, on the 18.5.1881.

It closed on the 11.1.1937 when the Society merged with the ex-Wesleyans in their chapel pending the erection of a new chapel.

The old chapel is now in use as the village hall"

Geoff Swain Collection 12 June 1994

Saxilby, Wesleyan Reform Union Chapel, methodist
Scawby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scawby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scawby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Brigg Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn White September 1997 (Revised July 1998) states :-

"The Society initially rented a barn for worship and a shop, adjacent to the present chapel, was leased from 1874.

The foundation stone for their own "Shaw" chapel, in Chapel Lane, was laid on the 22.5.1895 and the building opened on the 27.10.1895.

It is still in use with a membership of 13" 

Geoff Swain Collection 6 September 1993

Scawby, Primitive Methodist Chapel, church
Scopwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scopwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scopwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Wesleyan Methodist Chapel & associated Sunday School.

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 it is stated that :-

"A Society was formed in 1836 and the first chapel built in 1840.

Adjacent land was purchased in 1901 and the chapel demolished on Easter Monday, 1905.

Stone laying for a new chapel on the enlarged site, 79 Main Road, was held on the 10.5.1905 and the building opened on the 26.7.1905.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 14"  

DB 28 January 2019 

Scopwick, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scothern, Methodist Chapel
Scothern, Methodist Chapel
Scothern, Methodist Chapel

The first Methodist Chapel in the village was built by the Wesleyans in 1823.

It was replaced by the current building on Main Street in 1858.

September 2016

See another image of this church 

Scothern, Methodist chapel, wesleyans
Scotter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scotter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scotter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

On the corner of High Street and Hobb Lane. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"A Dissenter's Certificate was issued in June 1774 for 'a house lately built' and the first chapel erected in 1815.

Situated opposite the present chapel in the High Street it was sold circa 1900, following the opening of its replacement, and is now an empty shop.

The foundation stone for the second chapel, also in the High Street, was laid on the 19.7.1899 and the chapel opened on the 27.6.1900.

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 54"

Geoff Swain Collection 6th September 1993

Scotter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Scotter, West Street
Scotter, West Street
Scotter, West Street

This chapel on the right was opened by the Primitive Methodists in 1819 and then sold to the Methodist New Connexion in c.1849.

This society later became United Methodist and, after a schoolroom was added, the chapel was re-faced in 1901.

The last service was held in 1948 and it was sold for use as a warehouse. The building was demolished in 1971.

early 20th century postcard

Scotter, Primitive Methodist chapel, United methodist, New Connexion
Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel
Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel
Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel

A relatively rare chapel of this Methodist group was built here in 1887.

The last service (of what was then a united Methodist Church) was held in January 1984.

After closure the building was sold in 1986 and converted into a bungalow next to ‘Chapel Cottage’.

It is located at NGR TF 387 417 in Freiston parish.

Barry Barton, 1978
Freiston, United Free Methodist Chapel
Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel
Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel
Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel

An updated view of the chapel.

"Scrane End chapel was in the parish of Freiston. It was built in 1887 and closed in 1984"

https://www.lincstothepast.com/Records/RecordDisplaySearchResults.aspx?oid=578663&mode=c&pageNo=3 

DB 9 June 2018

Freiston, Scrane End, United Free Methodist Chapel
Scredington, Methodist Chapel
Scredington, Methodist Chapel
Scredington, Methodist Chapel

The chapel in Main Street was opened by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1875, replacing a chapel of 1840 on the same site.

It closed for worship in 1982 and has since been converted into a house.

June 2017

Scredington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Scrub Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scrub Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scrub Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Also known as Old Fen Lane, Offin Lane or Moorby Fen, this chapel was erected in 1839 and rebuilt in 1857.

The chapel closed in 2004.

It is located at NGR TF 232 554 in Wildmore parish bordering Coningsby parish.

Barry Barton, 1978

Wildmore, Scrub Hill Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scrub Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scrub Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Scrub Hill, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former chapel has been extended and refitted for domestic use. Windows and doors have been sensitively retained.

May 2018

Coningsby, Scrub Hill Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road

Originally a Primitive Methodist chapel. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"The foundation stone was laid on the 29.1.1908 and the chapel opened, in Frodingham Road at its junction with Smith Street, on the 14.10.1908.

It was burnt down on the 21.8.1970, rebuilt on the same site and reopened on the 15.7.1972.

It is still in use with a membership of 101"

Sadly the building has now closed and in September 2017 the Scunthorpe Telegraph reported that it had been standing empty for three years.

https://www.scunthorpetelegraph.co.uk/news/empty-scunthorpe-church-could-become-499308 

DB 19 February 2019 

Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road, Primitive, Chapel
Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road

The rear part of the building (perhaps a church hall or Sunday School?) seems to have escaped the fire of 21.8.1970.

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"The Primitive Methodist chapel, in Frodingham road, was built in 1908 at a cost, including site, schools, institute and an organ, of about £5,500:

there are 700 sittings"

DB 19 February 2019 

Centenary Methodist Church, Frodingham Road, Primitive Methodist chapel
Scunthorpe, Congregational Church, Oswald Road
Scunthorpe, Congregational Church, Oswald Road
Scunthorpe, Congregational Church, Oswald Road

"There is also a Congregational chapel, built in 1912, at a cost of £3,000, and seating 650 persons"

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919.

"In 1928 the membership numbered 107, the Sunday School had 139 scholars and 20 teachers and officers, and the choir numbered 36.

After World War Two a general decline set in and by the mid  nineties membership was two dozen plus two children.

Drastic action was called for"

https://www.scunthorpecc.co.uk/how-we-got-here/  

In 1998 the church moved to a new building on Ferry Road West and the Oswald Road premises is now occupied by the Light Bar.

DB 19 February 2019 

Scunthorpe, Congregational Church, Oswald Road, Light Bar
Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church

Ther Primitive Methodist Chapel on Frodingham Road, Scunthorpe.

postcard published by Bartle Brothers of Scunthorpe, c.1910

Scunthorpe, Primitive Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Seventh-day Adventist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Seventh-day Adventist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Seventh-day Adventist Church, Frodingham Road

"The Seventh-day Adventist Church is a Protestant Christian denomination distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week in Christian and Jewish calendars, as the Sabbath, and by its emphasis on the imminent Second Coming (advent) of Jesus Christ.

The denomination grew out of the Millerite movement in the United States during the mid-19th century and was formally established in 1863"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventh-day_Adventist_Church

DB 19 February 2019 

Scunthorpe, Seventh-day Adventist Church, Frodingham Road
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist / Methodist New Connexion, Market Hill
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist / Methodist New Connexion, Market Hill
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist / Methodist New Connexion, Market Hill

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"A chapel was built in 1888, and opened in January 1889, and replaced by Trinity in 1900.

It was sold to the Methodist New Connexion in 1899 and remained in use until circa 1914.

It is still standing and in use as offices"

Now in use by a charity "Magic Moments for Autistic Kids"

http://www.magicmomentsforautistickids.org/ 

DB 19 February 2019


Scunthorpe, Methodist Chapel, Market Hill, Magic Moments for Autistic Kids
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel and Sunday schools were built on High Street in 1900 at a cost of £7400.

postcard published by Bartle Brothers of Scunthorpe, undated

Scunthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Bartle brothers
Sibsey Northlands, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Sibsey Northlands, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Sibsey Northlands, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The first service here was held in May 1837 and it closed as a place of worship in 2006.

It was on sale with planning permission for conversion into a house in 2013.

It is located at NGR TF 347534

Barry Barton, 1977


Sibsey, Northlands, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (first)
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (first)
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (first)

This chapel situated on the corner of Chapel lane and Frithville Road opened in 1821.

It was retained as a Sunday School and then sold in 1967.

The building has been demolished and replaced by a row of terraced cottages named ‘Wesley Terrace’

It is located at NGR TF 352509.

Barry Barton, 1977
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)
Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel (second)

The second Wesleyan Methodist chapel opened on Main Road in June 1875.

The last service was held here in 1994 and the building was demolished two years later leaving an empty site.

It is located at NGR TF 352 510

Barry Barton, 1978

Sibsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Skegness, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Skegness, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Skegness, Primitive Methodist Chapel

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1905 states that :-

"The Primitive Methodist chapel, erected in 1884 on the Roman Bank, at a cost of £250, and rebuilt in 1899 at a cost of £2,070, has sittings for 500 persons"

Also

"Primitive Methodist, Roman Bank (Alford Circuit); 10.30 a.m. & 6 p.m Rev. Enoch Allport"

A church parlour was added and opened on 27/2/1924.

The last service was held on 30/9/1979.

Now standing empty and derelict. 

DB 30 October 2019

Skegness, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Church
Skegness, St Paul's Baptist Church
Skegness, St Paul's Baptist Church
Skegness, St Paul's Baptist Church

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1905, before the present building which dates from 1911, stated that :-

"St. Paul's Baptist church is an iron building, erected in 1894, in the Lumley road, and will seat 500 persons"

DB 30 October 2019

Skegness, Saint Paul's Baptist Church
Skegness, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Skegness, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Skegness, Wesleyan Methodist Church

The site of the Methodist Chapel in Algitha Road was given by the Earl of Scarbrough and the chapel was built for £1800 in 1882.

Seating in the chapel was for 600 (at a time when the population of the town was only 1358).

The front and east walls of the chapel (seen here) were seriously damaged in an air raid on Skegness on 16 February 1941. Full repairs, costing £3250, were delayed until the late 1940s.

December 2012

Skegness, Methodist Church, Algitha Road, Earl of Scarbrough, air raid
Skellingthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Skellingthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Skellingthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) it is stated that :-

"i) Services were held in a barn from 1817 and until a chapel was erected in 1822. Both have subsequently been demolished.

ii) A stonelaying for a new chapel, in the High Street, took place on the 6.8.1894 and the building opened on the 10.12.1894. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 38" 

DB 2020

Skellingthorpe, Wesleyan Methodist Church Chapel
Skillington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Skillington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Skillington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :- 

"i) Methodism was introduced circa 1782 and a chapel built in 1802. Closed in 1847 it is now a cottage in Chapel Lane.

ii) A second chapel was erected on The Green in 1847. It was enlarged and reopened on the 14.12.1905 and is still in use with a membership of 20" 

Geoff Swain Collection 6 February 1994

Skillington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Sleaford, Methodist Church
Sleaford, Methodist Church
Sleaford, Methodist Church

A new building on the site of the former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel - viewed from the east.

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 it is stated that :-

"A new chapel and ancilliary premises were opened in Northgate, to replace those in Westgate, on the 28.9.1848 and an organ installed in 1867.

A day school was added in 1865.

Additions were made in 1909 and major renovations occurred in 1929, but in 1968 the chapel was found to be unsafe.

The chapel was demolished and a new one, on the same site, was opened on the 8.7.1972, but the 1848 ancilliary premises and the 1865 school still continue to be used as schoolrooms.

A pipe organ from North Kyme Methodist Chapel was installed, and dedicated on the 23.9.1983, to replace a troublesome electronic organ.

The premises are still in use with a membership of 129"

DB 28 August 2019

Sleaford, Methodist Church
Sleaford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Westgate
Sleaford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Westgate
Sleaford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Westgate

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :- 

 

i) A Society was formed in 1821 and a schoolroom opened in Westgate on the 5.4.1835, with the first chapel being opened on the 8.11.1841. The premises were closed in 1907, with the opening of the new chapel, and are now a pair of houses, 65A & 65B Westgate.

 

ii) The second chapel, erected along the road towards the town centre and on the same side as the first, was opened on the 11.7.1907. The last service was held on the 5.1.1964 when the Society joined with that at Northgate. The chapel was demolished in the early 1980's and the site, No 53, is now occupied by the telephone exchange. 

 

DB 20 June 2018

Sleaford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Westgate
Sleaford, Riverside Church
Sleaford, Riverside Church
Sleaford, Riverside Church

A notice displayed at the church stated that

"Riverside church can trace its origin in Sleaford back to 1776 when a group of Sleafordians who wanted to worship God without the constraints of the prayerbook met together in Jermyn Street.

Some years later they constructed their first building which still stands today as flats number 30-32 Jermyn Street. 

This particular building was completed in 1867 by which time the church was known as Sleaford Independent Church.

It later became known as Sleaford Congregational Church and in 1972 Sleaford United Reformed Church. 

In the last few years the building has been extensively upgraded and the new rooms at the front were completed in 2007.

The interior of the building has now been modernised to bring it up to date and make it more available to the community as a whole. 

In 2008 the United Reformed Church in Sleaford amalgamated with Sleaford Community Church to form the Church who now worship here under the name of Riverside Church"

DB 20 June 2018

Sleaford, Riverside Church, Congregational, United Reformed Church
Sleaford, Riverside Church
Sleaford, Riverside Church
Sleaford, Riverside Church

A notice displayed at the church sated that

"In the last few years the building has been extensively upgraded and the new rooms at the front were completed in 2007.

The interior of the building has now been modernised to bring it up to date and make it more available to the community as a whole. 

DB 20 June 2018

Sleaford, Riverside Church
Sleaford, Salvation Army, West Banks
Sleaford, Salvation Army, West Banks
Sleaford, Salvation Army, West Banks

"A Wesleyan Reform Methodist chapel opened in West Banks in 1864, but since 1896 has been occupied by the Salvation Army"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleaford 

DB 20 June 2018

Sleaford, Salvation Army, West Banks, Wesleyan Reform Methodist
Sleaford, The Temple, East Gate
Sleaford, The Temple, East Gate
Sleaford, The Temple, East Gate

This was a Particular Baptist Church built for the congregation of Edward Samuel, a Polish Jew who had converted to Christianity.

Now a piano showroom.

https://sleafordheritage.co.uk/about/locations/the-temple/ 

http://www.wspianos.co.uk/  

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states

"The Baptist chapel, Eastgate, was erected in 1881 at a cost of about £650, and will seat 150"

DB 20 June 2018

Sleaford, The Temple, Edward Samuel, Particular Baptist, White and Sentence piano showroom
Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Chapel in Northgate opened in 1848. It was replaced by a new building on the same site in 1972.

Postcard posted in 1908

Sleaford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Snitterby, Methodist Chapel
Snitterby, Methodist Chapel
Snitterby, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel Lane was built in 1840 and is now converted into a dwelling.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Snitterby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sotby, Methodist Chapel
Sotby, Methodist Chapel
Sotby, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist built this, their second chapel in the village, in 1894. It closed in 1980 and for many years stood derelict.

June 2018

Sotby, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
South Killingholme, Methodist Chapel
South Killingholme, Methodist Chapel
South Killingholme, Methodist Chapel

South Killingholme Methodist Church in Town Street was opened in 1974 to replace the Wesleyan chapel of 1862 which had become unsafe.

The adjacent Sunday school (to the left rear) was built in 1924.

September 2019

South Killingholme, Methodist Chapel
South Ferriby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Ferriby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Ferriby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Barton-On-Humber Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised May 1998) it is stated that :- 

"A Society was formed in 1769 and a chapel erected in 1792. Wesley Chapel was built on the same site in Farrisher's Lane in 1839 and is still in use with a membership of 21"

Recently for sale September 2020 "with potential for conversion to a dwelling".

Geoff Swain Collection 17 August 1993

South Ferriby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
South Kelsey, United Methodist Chapel
South Kelsey, United Methodist Chapel
South Kelsey, United Methodist Chapel

This neat building on the east side of Caistor Road was first used by the Free Methodists who later became United Methodists.

The last service was held here in December 1967 and it was subsequently converted into a dwelling.

May 2016

South Kelsey, Free methodist, United Methodist Church chapel
South Kelsey, Welsyan&nbspMethodist Chapel
South Kelsey, Welsyan Methodist Chapel
South Kelsey, Welsyan Methodist Chapel

South Kelsey's Wesleyan Methodists opened this chapel in 1877 and added a Sunday schoolroom in 1894.

August 2018

South Kelsey, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The 1879 Wesleyan chapel in South Reston replaced an earlier building of 1837. It closed for worship in 2006.

Image from a postcard sent from South Reston to Withern in 1908.

South Reston, Wesleyan
South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Louth Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson March 1998 (revised August 1999) it is stated that :-

 

"i) A Society was formed in 1780 and a chapel erected in 1815.

 

ii) A second chapel was built in 1837.

 

iii) The Main Road chapel was opened on the 9.10.1879 and is still in use with a membership of 8"

 
The chapel has subsequently closed and is now a private house.

DB 29 June 2019

South Reston, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Willingham, Methodist Chapel
South Willingham, Methodist Chapel
South Willingham, Methodist Chapel

The old chapel in South Willingham was built in 1834 and enlarged in 1877. The adjacent school room was added in 1903.

The chapel closed for worship in 1972.

August 2019

South Willingham, Methodist Chapel
South Witham, Congregational Chapel
South Witham, Congregational Chapel
South Witham, Congregational Chapel

The inscription in the gable end reads 'Home Missionary Chapel erected 1843' and below on the string course is 'and British School'.

Located at the corner of Thistleton Lane & High Street. 

September 2010

South Witham, Congregational Chapel, image, church, british school
South Witham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Witham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
South Witham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Sheperdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"A chapel, in Church Street, was opened on the 1.11.1812. The foundation stone for the second chapel, on the same site, was laid on the 16.8.1882. The chapel closed in 1951 and was sold in 1953 for use as a village hall but is now in use as a store" 

Geoff Swain Collection 9 May 1994

South Witham, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, image
Southrey, Methodist Chapel
Southrey, Methodist Chapel
Southrey, Methodist Chapel

Southrey’s Wesleyan Methodist Chapel was built in 1838.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Southrey, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Spalding, Congregational Church & Sunday School
Spalding, Congregational Church & Sunday School
Spalding, Congregational Church & Sunday School

Sunday School dated 1856 with the church beyond.

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1306520 

Now United Reformed Church. 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"Congregational chapel in Pinchbeck road, erected in 1821, seating 500 persons, with a branch chapel in Holbeach road, built in 1841, and having 100 sittings"

DB 2 October 2019

Spalding, Congregational Church, United Reformed Church, Sunday School
Spalding, Friends' Meeting House
Spalding, Friends' Meeting House
Spalding, Friends' Meeting House

"Originally 1805, completely restored 1965"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1063972 

DB 2 October 2019

Spalding, Friends' Meeting House
Spalding, Primitive Methodist Chapel, St Thomas' Road
Spalding, Primitive Methodist Chapel, St Thomas' Road
Spalding, Primitive Methodist Chapel, St Thomas' Road

Stated in "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Spalding Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Norman Leveritt September 1997 (Revised August 1988) that :-

"The chapel opened on the 8.10.1871.

The interior was modernised in 1954-55 and now includes three memorial windows commemorating the Jepson, Wilson and Woodham families which were removed from The Crescent United Methodist chapel on its closure following the merger of the two Societies in 1955

The chapel is still in use with a membership of 69"

Unfortunately the chapel has now closed with worshipers moving to the Broad Street Methodist Church on Easter Sunday 2018.

Building advertised with an asking price of £275,000 and was subsequently bought by the Catholic Diocese of Nottingham. 

DB 2 October 2019

Spalding, Primitive Methodist, church, chapel
Spalding, Salvation Army Hall
Spalding, Salvation Army Hall
Spalding, Salvation Army Hall

Former Salvation Army Hall on the north side of Westlode Street.

Date stones at the front of the building read "1910".

Closed for worship around 2001 and nearest Salvation Army presence is now in Bourne.

DB 2 October 2019


Spalding, Salvation Army Hall
Spalding, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Spalding, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Spalding, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Broad Street

"Methodist church and attached Sunday school. 1887. By F Boreham"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1067614 

Stated in "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Spalding Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Norman Leveritt September 1997 (Revised August 1988) that :-

"The second Wesleyan chapel was erected on the site of the old prison in Broad Street in 1826 and registered on the 15.5.1827.

The first harmonium was purchased in 1856 and replaced by a better one in 1866.

A two storey Sunday school was added along side the chapel in 1861 and the chapel reseated in 1868.

Additional land, adjacent to the site, was purchased to enable the erection of the third chapel, with the foundation stone being laid on the 8.7.1886.

The chapel opened on the 3.3.1887 and then the 1826 chapel was demolished to allow the building of a new Sunday school.

The foundation stone was laid on the 16.6.1887 and the Sunday school opened on the 3 11.1887.

An organ was installed in the chapel and opened on the 16.4.1896.

The chapel, a Grade II listed building, is still in use with a membership of 111"

DB 2 October 2019

Spalding, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel, Church
Spalding, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Spalding, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Broad Street
Spalding, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Broad Street

Sunday School attached to the chapel.

DB 2 October 2019

Spalding, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel, Church
Spilsby, Methodist Church
Spilsby, Methodist Church
Spilsby, Methodist Church

The Methodist Chapel in Spilsby (originally the Wesleyan Chapel) has a prominent location at the east end of the Market Place.

It was built in 1878 by Charles Bell* of stock brick with Geometrical tracery, a typical town chapel of its period.

July 2014

See other images of this church

* Charles Bell ARIBA (1846-1899) was born and educated in Grantham. His architectural practice was in London and he built more than 60 Methodist chapels.

Spilsby, Methodist Church, Charles Bell
Spridlington, Methodist Chapel
Spridlington, Methodist Chapel
Spridlington, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel at Spridlington dates from the late 19th century, probably replacing one built in 1838.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Spridlington, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Stainton le Vale, Methodist Chapel
Stainton le Vale, Methodist Chapel
Stainton le Vale, Methodist Chapel

The corrugated iron village hall was erected as a chapel for the Primitive Methodists in 1893. The last service was held in the building in 1933 before its change of use.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Stainton le Vale, Primitive Methodist Chapel, village hall
Stallingborough, Methodist Church
Stallingborough, Methodist Church
Stallingborough, Methodist Church

The former Wesleyan Methodist chapel on Station Road opened in 1865 - the datestone says 1864.

The front section of the building was demolished in 1965 and a new façade built to face the road.

September 2019

Stallingborough, Methodist chapel, Wesleyan
Stamford, Methodist Church
Stamford, Methodist Church
Stamford, Methodist Church

This church, built of local stone for the Wesleyan Methodists, opened in 1886 on the site of No.11 Barn Hill, immediately in front of the older church (which was retained for the Sunday School). The cost was approximately £3000.

September 2014

Stamford, Methodist Church, Barn Hill
Stamford, United Reformed Church
Stamford, United Reformed Church
Stamford, United Reformed Church

This substantial church in Star Lane was built as a Congregational chapel in 1819 with seating for 800 at a cost of £1800. It replaced an earlier chapel (built 1720) on the same site.

The windows on the upper floor are the ones of the Georgian period; those on the lower floor are Victorian. Inside are box pews and a gallery around three sides.

March 2016

Stamford, United Reform Church
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel

The first chapel here in Fen House Lane was erected in 1854 at a cost of £120.

In 1883 a second chapel was built alongside the first; it closed in 1919 and was sold three years later.

Both chapel buildings survive after conversion, the first as a store and the second as a dwelling.

They are located at NGR TF 357 599.

Barry Barton, 1977
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Ebenezer Primitive Methodist Chapel

The two chapel buildings survive well into the 21st century, still largely intact and unmodified externally.

May 2018

Stickford, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel for the Wesleyans was also built in Fen House Lane.

The first service took place in 1867 and it remained in use until 2002.

It is located at NGR TF 358 600

Barry Barton, 1978

Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The former chapel has been adapted as a residence but the external features remain unchenged.

May 2018

Stickford, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickney West Houses, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickney West Houses, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickney West Houses, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

A relatively short-lived place of worship, this chapel was erected in 1866 and services were discontinued in 1907.

The chapel was sold in 1913 and the building remained roofless and half demolished for over 80 years.

It is located at NGR TF 337 542 on the southern edge of Stickney parish where it adjoins Sibsey parish.

Barry Barton, 1977

Stickney West Houses Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Stickney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The third Wesleyan Methodist chapel in the village opened in November 1857.

When the chapel became unsafe the adjoining Sunday schoolroom was used for services.

The final service was held in July 1974 and the building was sold in 1977 and demolished soon after.

A bungalow now occupies the chapel site.

It is located at NGR TF 344 569.

Barry Barton, 1977

Stickney, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Susworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Susworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Susworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"1) Built in 1815.

ii) The second chapel was built in 1903 and a Sunday school was added and opened on the 6.11.1935. The last service was held on the 10.10.1971. The chapel was subsequently sold and in 1973 converted in to a house"

Date stone reads "Wesleyan Church 1903"

DB 18 June 2019 

Susworth, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Stated in "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Spalding Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Norman Leveritt September 1997 (Revised August 1988) that :-

"i) The first chapel was erected in 1845 in Fosdyke Road, opposite the present one, and sold on the opening of its replacement. It has since been demolished.

ii) It was replaced with a new chapel on a site across the road and opened on the 1.12.1927. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 5" 

DB 30 April 2010

Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church
Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Flower festival in progress.

DB 30 April 2010

Sutterton, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Sutton on Sea, Methodist Church
Sutton on Sea, Methodist Church
Sutton on Sea, Methodist Church

The Wesleyan Methodists opened this chapel in a prominent position on Station Road, at the junction with Alford Road, in May 1910.

September 2018

Sutton On Sea, Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Sutton St Edmund, Methodist Chapel
Sutton St Edmund, Methodist Chapel
Sutton St Edmund, Methodist Chapel

Erected in 1870 on Broadgate and closed in 1970, the chapel is now in use as a dwelling.

September 2017

Sutton St Edmund, Methodist chapel
Sutton St James, Baptist Church
Sutton St James, Baptist Church
Sutton St James, Baptist Church

The General Baptist Chapel is in Chapel Gate and remains in active use.

September 2017

Sutton St James, Baptist church chapel
Swinderby, Methodist Chapel
Swinderby, Methodist Chapel
Swinderby, Methodist Chapel

This former Wesleyan Methodist chapel was built in 1869 at a cost of about £600.

It is currently used for worship by the Newark Christian Fellowship under the name 'Light and Life Missions'.

August 2016

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Swinderby, Methodist Chapel
Tanvats, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tanvats, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tanvats, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Tanvats is a hamlet in the parish of Metheringham. 

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"i) The first chapel was erected in 1835.

ii) The foundation stone of the second chapel was laid on the 4.8.1887. The last service was held on the 28.12.1969 and the chapel is now standing derelict and for sale for housing development"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Metheringham, Tanvats, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Tattershall Thorpe, Methodist Chapel & War Memorial
Tattershall Thorpe, Methodist Chapel & War Memorial
Tattershall Thorpe, Methodist Chapel & War Memorial

Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel 1865 with War Memorial Arch in front.

War memorial is a listed structure :-

"Nothing is known about the designer or craftsman, and despite research having been carried out locally, it is not known when the memorial was erected"

https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1412603

DB 18 April 2018  

 

Tattershall Thorpe, Wesleyan, Methodist Chapel, War Memorial
Tattershall, Methodist Chapel
Tattershall, Methodist Chapel
Tattershall, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist Chapel on Lodge Road, the second in the village, opened in 1849 and a Sunday school was added in 1893. It closed for worship in 1974.

DB 5 April 2018 

Tattershall, Weslyan, Methodist, Chapel
Tealby, Methodist Chapel
Tealby, Methodist Chapel
Tealby, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Front Street opened in 1819 and closed in 1993.

It is listed Grade II.

July 2017

Tealby, Methodist chapel
Tetney Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Tetney Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Tetney Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist chapel opened in 1864 and closed in 1954. It is now a dwelling, ‘The Old Chapel House’.

June 2012

Tetney, Lock, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Thealby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thealby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thealby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"A chapel was built behind a row of cottages in Normanby Road and opened on the 2.6.1871.

A Sunday school was added in 1927 and a new porch to the chapel in 1973.

The chapel closed in 1993 and is now standing disused"

Thealby is a hamlet in the parish of Burton upon Stather.

Geoff Swain Collection 6 September 1993

Thealby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Thornton le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thornton le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thornton le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel here (also known as Bunkers Hill) opened in September 1875 and closed in October 1959.

The building was sold in 1965 and subsequently demolished. The house built on the site is known as ‘Chapel Cottage’.

It is located at NGR TF 269 528 in Thornton le Fen parish.

Barry Barton, 1979

Thornton le Fen, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thorpe Fendykes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thorpe Fendykes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thorpe Fendykes, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel at Thorpe Fendykes was opened in 1923 at a cost of £2000, mainly raise by local small holders.

It was built by Mr J Dean of Burgh le Marsh and was still in use in the 1990s.

It is located at NGR TF 452 605 in Thorpe St Peter parish.

Barry Barton, 1977

Thorpe St Peter, Fendyke Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel

The John Hunt Memorial Chapel was built by the Wesleyan Methodists in 1909, providing space for a congregation of 120. It cost £850 to build.

The building, now converted for residential occupation, occupies a prominent position in the centre of the village. Its bright red brick with cream brick and painted stone details makes a striking front facade.

August 2016

See other images of this church

Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel, John Hunt
Thorpe on the Hill, United Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, United Methodist Chapel
Thorpe on the Hill, United Methodist Chapel

This small brick 'box', which stood on Main Street about 50 yards west of the junction with Blacksmith Lane, served as a chapel successively for the Wesleyan Reform Union, the Free Methodists and the United Methodists.

It was built in 1858 and ceased to be used as a place of worship in 1950.

photograph, 1980

Thorpe on the Hill, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan Reform Union, Free methodists, United methodists
Thurlby, Free Methodist Chapel, Northorpe Lane
Thurlby, Free Methodist Chapel, Northorpe Lane
Thurlby, Free Methodist Chapel, Northorpe Lane

Former Free Methodist Chapel now a private house.

Colin Shepherdson in A Brief History of the Bourne Circuit states that :-

"A Society was formed circa 1851 and a private chapel, built for and let to the Reformers, situated in Crown Lane was opened on the 27.7.1851.

The Society built their own chapel, known as Top Chapel and situated at the junction of Northorpe Lane and The Green in 1861" 

"A school room was erected at the tear of the chapel in 1903 and the organ was rebuilt in 1960.

The last service was held in October 1974 and the chapel subsequently used as a workshop but then in 1995 converted into a dwelling "Kirktom House". 

DB 17 November 2018

Thurlby, Free Methodist Chapel
Thurlby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street
Thurlby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street
Thurlby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street

This, the former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, was built in 1912 at a cost of £800 with seating for 350.

September 2014

Thurlby by Bourne, Methodist Chapel
Thurlby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street
Thurlby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street
Thurlby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High Street

Looking south towards the original entrance - axis of the church has been turned through 180°.

DB 9 June 2019

Thurlby, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel
Timberland Dales, Waterside Chapel (Wesleyan Methodist)
Timberland Dales, Waterside Chapel (Wesleyan Methodist)
Timberland Dales, Waterside Chapel (Wesleyan Methodist)

Chapel pictured following closure but prior to its conversion into a house. 

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Coningsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised July 1998) it is stated that :-

"The first chapel was erected in 1837 and the foundation stone for a second chapel, on the same site, was laid on the 20.6.1901.

The new chapel was opened on the 20.11.1901 and it closed in March 1993.

It was sold in October 1994 and converted into a house"

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Timberland Dales, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Church, Sunday School, Waterside Chapel, image
Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Timberland, Primitive Methodist Chapel

 "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"Preaching commenced in 1820 and the foundation stone of the chapel in Church Lane was laid on the 30.4.1878.

The last service was held on the 7.7.1940 and the chapel is now in commercial use by "Timberland Art & Design""

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Timberland, Primitive Methodist chapel, church, image
Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Sleaford Circuit Past And Present" prepared by  Colin Shepherdson & Peter Robinson June 1996 states :-

"i) A house was registered for worship in 1817 and the first chapel erected in 1822 or 23 or 24 in Bakehouse Lane. The chapel was enlarged in 1839 but replaced in 1878 and sold in 1879. It was used by Headlands Bakery for some years but was standing unused in 1978.

ii) The foundation stone of the West Street chapel was laid on the 16.4.1878 and the chapel opened on the 8.10.1878. Electricity was installed in 1948 and the chapel is still in use with a membership of 13" 

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Timberland, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Toynton All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Chapel in Chapel lane was built in 1860 with a Sunday school added in 1939.

It is located at NGR TF 392639.

Barry Barton, 1978

Toynton All Saints,
Toynton Fenside, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Toynton Fenside, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Toynton Fenside, Primitive Methodist Chapel

This chapel dates from 1867. The last service was held in April 1960 and it has now houses a workshop.

It is located at NGR TF 396622. On Fenside Road

Barry Barton, 1978
Toynton All Saints, Fenside Primitive Methodist Chapel
Toynton Fenside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton Fenside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton Fenside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyans opened this chapel in 1882 and added a Sunday school in 1923.

It closed for worship in 1989 and stood in derelict condition for several years.

It is located at NGR TF 395 616 in Toynton All Saints parish (border of Toynton St Peter parish).

Barry Barton, 1977

Toynton All Saints, Fenside Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton St Peter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton St Peter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Toynton St Peter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This early chapel was erected in 1811 with Sunday School added in 1924.

The final service was held in 1993 and the building stood empty awaiting sale for several years.

It is located at NGR TF 402633.

Barry Barton, 1978

Toynton St Peter, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This, the second chapel on the site, was opened in 1897 and remained in active use through to the twenty-first century.

It is located at NGR TF 264512 in Tumby parish.

Barry Barton, 1977
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel closed for worship in 2004 and now appears to be in the process of conversion to a house.

May 2018

Tumby Woodside, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel
Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel
Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Chapel at Ulceby is on the A1028 in the centre of the village.

September 2015

Ulceby with Fordington, Methodist Chapel
Ulceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ulceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Ulceby, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The chapel on High Street was built for the Primitive Methodists in 1889 to replace a smaller building on Abbey Road. It closed for worship in 1943 and was sold in 1950.

September 2019

Ulceby (North Lincolnshire), Primitive methodist chapel
Ulceby, Seventh Day Adventist Church
Ulceby, Seventh Day Adventist Church
Ulceby, Seventh Day Adventist Church

This small chapel at the end of Spruce Lane and beginning of Station Road was the very first Adventist owned church in the UK when dedicated in 1889.

September 2019

Ulceby (North Lincolnshire),
Ulceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ulceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Ulceby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The Methodist Chapel on Front Street was built for the Wesleyans in 1909, the second chapel on this site.

September 2019

Ulceby (North Lincolnshire), Wesleyan Methodist chapel
Waddingham, Methodist Chapel
Waddingham, Methodist Chapel
Waddingham, Methodist Chapel

The former Primitive Methodist chapel schoolroom, built in 1865, is the current Methodist Chapel in the village.

The larger chapel was demolished in 1993 and is now an open space for car parking.

Pearl Wheatley, 2011

Waddingham, Primitive Methodist chapel
Waddington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Waddington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Waddington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Lincoln Circuits Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson (Revised October 2000) states :-

"i) A house was licensed for worship in 1793 and a chapel erected in Chapel Lane (now Maltkiln Lane) in 1817.

ii) Hill Top chapel was opened on the 2.4.1850 and a vestry added in 1852. It closed following the opening of the High Street chapel in 1905 and subsequently became the village hall but is now two houses, 'Hill Crest House' and "Hall Cottage'.

iii) The stone laying for the High Street chapel was held on the 31.5.1905 and the building opened in October of the same year. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 20"

High Street chapel closed in 2005. 

Geoff Swain Collection 24 June 1994

Waddington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Wainfleet All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel

A chapel was built by the Primitve Methodists - the second in the town - in Rumbold Street in 1869.

It closed for worship in the 1930s and was used for a while as a cinema.

August 2018

Wainfleet All Saints, Primitive Methodist Chapel, cinema
Wainfleet All Saints, Salvation Army Hall
Wainfleet All Saints, Salvation Army Hall
Wainfleet All Saints, Salvation Army Hall

Former Salvation Army Hall. 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states :-

"The salvation Army barracks, erected in 1884, will hold 100 persons"

Located next to the Methodist Church. 

DB 6 September 2019

Wainfleet All Saints, Salvation Army Hall
Wainfleet All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The chapel in St John’s Street opened in July 1902, replacing a chapel of 1820 on the same site.

The original iron railings and part of the boundary wall at the front of the chapel have been removed.

July 2014

Wainfleet All Saints, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet Bank, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet Bank, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wainfleet Bank, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The first service held by the Primitive Methodists here was in September 1838.

It is Grade II listed and was still in use in the 1990s.

It is located at NGR TF 470 592 on Mill Lane in Wainfleet All Saints parish.

Barry Barton, 1978

Wainfleet All Saints, Wainfleet Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel
Walcott, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Walcott, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Walcott, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The first Methodist society was formed here in 1769. The chapel on the main road, built for the Wesleyan Methodists, was built in 1869.

It ceased as a place of worship in 1982 and has since been converted into a dwelling.

April 2018

Walcott, by Billinghay, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Walkerith, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Walkerith, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Walkerith, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Gainsborough Circuit" Revised August 1998 Sheperson & English state

"A chapel was erected in 1834 and the last service held on the 31.8.1969.

The chapel was sold in 1972 and is still standing, apparently disused, alongside the main road"

There was a planning application notice next to the chapel for its conversion to a one bed studio. 

DB 29 December 2018

Walkerith, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel

This is the earlier of two chapels standing side by side on Main Road; it was built in 1857 and was retained for use as the Sunday school.

January 2017

Washingborough, Free Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Washingborough, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel, also built for the Free Methodists (later the United Methodists), was erected in 1882.

Additional rooms and ‘modern facilities’ have been added over the years.

January 2017

Washingborough, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Welbourn, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High St
Welbourn, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High St
Welbourn, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, High St

"The chapel was built in 1839 and closed in 1973"

https://www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/upload/public/attachments/749/welbourn.pdf 

DB 24 June 2018

Welbourn, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Welby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Welby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Welby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "Brief Details of Chapels in the Grantham Circuit" Revised August 1998 Colin Shepherdson and Allen Griffin state :-

"A Society was formed in 1803 and a house registered for worship on 27.3.1850. A chapel, built 1866 in West End, was rented and the last service was held on the 18.5.1975. It is now convened in to a house, "The Old Chapel""

Geoff Swain Collection 9 May 1994

Welby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image
Wellingore Hall
Wellingore Hall
Wellingore Hall

The attached Roman Catholic Church of St Augustine is visible on the left of this image of the North entrance front.

DB 28 May 2011 

Wellingore, Hall, Neville, J MacVicar Anderson, St Augustine
Wellingore, Methodist Chapel
Wellingore, Methodist Chapel
Wellingore, Methodist Chapel

"Wellingore Chapel was built by the Primitive Methodists in 1837, but sold to the Wesleyan Methodists about 1842.

A new chapel was built in front of the old one in 1887.

The chapel closed in 1993"

https://www.lincolnshire.gov.uk/upload/public/attachments/749/wellingore.pdf 

Kelly's Directory of Lincolnshire 1919 states "A Wesleyan chapel was erected in 1887 in place of the old one, now used as a Sunday school"

DB 17 September 2020

Wellingore, Wesleyan, Methodist, Chapel, Jubilee, sunday school, church, image
Welton Hill, Methodist Chapel
Welton Hill, Methodist Chapel
Welton Hill, Methodist Chapel

The former Free Methodist chapel was built alongside the A46 two miles north-east of Welton in 1866.

It is an attractive small building in red and pale yellow brick with dog-tooth decoration on the front elevation.

August 2011

Welton Hill, Methodist Church Chapel, Free Methodist
Welton, Methodist Church
Welton, Methodist Church
Welton, Methodist Church

The chapel in Welton opened in 1815 and a Sunday School room was in 1898.

August 2011

Welton, Methodist Chapel
Welton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Welton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Welton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Primitive Methodist Chapel, at Ryland in Welton, was built in 1839 and is currently used as a garage.

Pearl Wheatley, 2010

Welton, Ryland, Primitive methodist chapel
West Torrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Market Rasen & Caistor Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Eileen H Mumby September 1997 (revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"i) A house was registered in 1769 and a chapel built in 1843.

ii) A second chapel was built in 1859 and a Sunday school added to the side in 1893. It is still in use with a membership of 8"

Unfortunately the chapel closed in 2007.

DB 18 April 2019

West Torrington, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Methodist Chapel
West Torrington, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodist chapel here was built in 1859.

August 2015

See other images of this church

West Torrington, Methodist Chapel
Wickenby, Free Methodist Chapel
Wickenby, Free Methodist Chapel
Wickenby, Free Methodist Chapel

This chapel for the Free Methodists (later United Methodists) was opened in May 1878 and the last service held in December 1967.

It was sold for youth drama work in 1970 and is now the Broadbent Theatre, home of the Lindsey Rural Players.

April 2017

Wickenby, Free methodist Chapel, Broadbent Theatre
Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The Hollowgate Hill Methodist Chapel built in 1867 to serve in the Scotter Primitive Methodist Circuit, and replaced an earlier chapel of 1837.

The chapel closed in 1979 and has now been converted into apartments.

Pearl Wheatley, 2012

Willoughton, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Hollowgate Hill
Wilsford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Main Street
Wilsford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Main Street
Wilsford, Primitive Methodist Chapel, Main Street

"The chapel was opened in 1899 as a successor to the chapel next door.

It was closed in 1969"

http://www.heritagegateway.org.uk/Gateway/Results_Single.aspx?uid=MLI89606&resourceID=1006 

The chapel next door refers to the building with a green roof just visible on the right hand side of this image. 

DB 16 April 2018

Wilsford, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Winterton, Trinity Methodist Church, King Street
Winterton, Trinity Methodist Church, King Street
Winterton, Trinity Methodist Church, King Street

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Scunthorpe Circuit Past And Present” prepared By Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn G White March 1997 (Revised August 1998) it is stated that :-

"The foundation stone for the new "Trinity" church, built on the site of the old King Street Wesleyan chapel, was laid on the 26.8.1961 and the church opened on the 5.4.1962 for the combined ex WM & PM congregations.

It is still in use with a membership of 78"

DB 14 May 2019

Winterton, Trinity Methodist Church, Chapel
Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

In "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Alford, Skegness & Wainfleet Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson July 1998 it is stated that :-

"i) A chapel was erected in Main Street circa 1809-11. It has since been demolished but had stood opposite the second chapel.

ii) The second chapel, in Main Street, was opened on the 28.6.1875 Improvements were made to the chapel which was reopened on the 4.11.1901 and following further alterations it was reopened again on the 25.8.1962. The chapel is still in use with a membership of 19"

Items displayed for sale outside the church in aid of the Sunday School. 

DB 29 June 2019

Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

The sanctuary area has been brought forward and a dividing wall inserted to allow space at the back for a kitchen etc.

"Our building was modernised in 2000 and we have served hundreds of meals from our kitchen. 

Scores of onlookers had a hearty breakfast waiting to cheer on the Olympic flame in 2012"

https://eastlincolnshiremethodistcircuit.org.uk/chapels/withern 

DB 29 June 2019

Withern, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wood Enderby, Methodist Chapel
Wood Enderby, Methodist Chapel
Wood Enderby, Methodist Chapel

The former Wesleyan Methodist chapel in Wood Enderby was built at the crossroads in the centre of the village in 1876, with a Sunday school added in 1898.

The last service was held in 1973.

August 2017

Wood Enderby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church

The striking red-brick chapel on Broadway opened in 1907, costing about £4000.

In the 1990s the chapel was sold for business use and the ancillary buildings to the rear on Iddesleigh Road were adapted for worship and other church and community activities.

August 2013

Woodhall Spa, Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church

"A Society was extant in 1851 and a chapel was opened on the 6.9.1899 in Iddesleigh Road.

A new chapel, built alongside the old one but facing The Broadway, was opened on the 5.8.1907 with the old chapel continued in use as a Sunday school.

A new organ was opened on the 18.4.1934.

The second chapel was sold in June 1994 and is now convened into business premises whilst the congregation continue to meet in the old chapel at the rear, reconverted for the purpose, with a membership of 77"

From "A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Coningsby Circuit Past And Present" prepared by Colin Shepherdson September 1997 (Revised July 1998). 

DB 26 January 2019

Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel, Church, Iddesleigh Road
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church
Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist Church

Looking west towards the front of the church.

DB 26 January 2019

Woodhall Spa, Wesleyan Methodist, Chapel, Church, Iddesleigh Road
Wootton, Methodist Chapel
Wootton, Methodist Chapel
Wootton, Methodist Chapel

The Wesleyan Methodists built this chapel on High Street in 1913

September 2019

Wootton, Wesleyan Methodist Church Chapel
Worlaby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Worlaby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Worlaby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

Worlaby’s Wesleyan Methodist chapel was built in 1858 and a Sunday school room added in 1927.

It closed in 1991 and the building is now in use as a store.

April 2018

Worlaby, Methodist Chapel, Wesleyan
Wragby, Methodist Chapel
Wragby, Methodist Chapel
Wragby, Methodist Chapel

The Methodist Church in Wragby, built in 1894, is typical of the late 19th century / Edwardian style. The sanctuary is on the right, the school room and 'facilities' are on the left.

June 2017

Wragby, Methodist Chapel Wesleyan
Wragby, Methodist Chapel
Wragby, Methodist Chapel
Wragby, Methodist Chapel

Internal view during the West Lindsey Churches festival with a display of rural crafts.

The pipe organ, which is also a war memorial, can bee seen on the left.

DB 12 May 2018

Wragby, Methodist Church,
Wrangle Bank, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wrangle Bank, Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wrangle Bank, Primitive Methodist Chapel

The ‘Prims’ opened a chapel here in 1838 and then rebuilt it on the same site in 1875.

The last service was held in 1972 and the building was sold later the same year and subsequently used as a store.

When visited in the mid-1990s the chapel had been gutted and was derelict and overgrown.

It is located at NGR TF 430 539.

Barry Barton, 1977
Wrangle, Wrangle Bank Primitive Methodist Chapel
Wrangle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wrangle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wrangle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

This chapel was first used in June 1843 and remained open until the 1990s.

It is located at NGR TF 433512.

Barry Barton, 1979
Wrangle, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wrawby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wrawby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wrawby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Brigg Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson & Mervyn White September 1997 (Revised July 1998) states :-

"i) A Society was formed circa 1764 and the first chapel erected in 1827. It was sold in 1890 after the opening of the new chapel.

ii) The foundation stone for a new chapel, in Vicarage Road, was laid on the 14.7.1885 and the chapel opened on the 13.9.1885.

A Sunday school was added in 1890.

The chapel was renovated in 1965. ready for the merger with the Brigg Road congregation, and is still in use with a membership of 17"

Unfortunately the chapel closed in 2005. 

Geoff Swain Collection 18 October 1993

Wrawby, Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church
Wyberton, West End Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wyberton, West End Wesleyan Methodist Chapel
Wyberton, West End Wesleyan Methodist Chapel

"A List And Brief Details Of Chapels In The Boston Circuit Past And Present” prepared by Colin Shepherdson October 1996 (Revised August 1998) states :-

"i) The first chapel was erected in 1826.

ii) The second chapel was built in 1849 and the last service was held on the 22.10.1939. The chapel was sold in October 1944 and is now extended to make a workshop"

DB 21 September 2020

Wyberton, West End Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, church, image