Choose a Topic ....
Photograph Galleries
ABCDEFGHIKLMNOPQRSTUWY
Archaeology - Stone Age
 
Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe
Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe
Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe

The analysis of the petrology of Neolithic stone axes has been an important element of their study for the last few decades.

Understanding the sources of the stone used has enabled a greater understanding of trade routes and the desirability of certain materials. 

Petrological study is also highlighting when axes are made from exotic stones, which hint at far wider patterns of trade and cultural connection.

This axe, from Potterhanworth, is one such object.  It is made from jadeite sourced in the foothills of Monte Viso in the Italian Alps.  It was made around 4,000BC but probably entered Britain a few centuries later.

Only a handful of axes of this type are known from Britain.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Potterhanworth, Stone Age jadeite axe, Mount Viso
Skendleby, Giants Hill, Long Barrow
Skendleby, Giants Hill, Long Barrow
Skendleby, Giants Hill, Long Barrow

This is all that remains of the Giants Hills Neolithic long barrow.

The principal remaining barrow is 200ft (60m) long and 5ft (1.5m) high at TF 428711.

Excavation in the 1930s revealed a timber enclosure and the skeletons of eight individuals. Construction of the barrow began in about 3000 BC, with use continuing for about 1000 years.

Two other barrows were originally nearby - four more survive in this part of the Wolds.


Frank Robinson, 2010

Skendleby, long barrow, neolithic, Giants Hill,
Weton le Wold, Stone Age axe
Weton le Wold, Stone Age axe
Weton le Wold, Stone Age axe

The site of Welton le Wold is one of the most important in the East Midlands for the study of the sequences of Ice Age glaciation in the region and the presence of early hominins.

This Palaeolithic handaxe is one of three discovered at the site in 1973 by Allan Straw and Chris Alabaster, and represents one of the oldest hominin tools known from the county.

Even more important is the fact that it comes from a site that has also produced animal remains, and is a probable hunting and butchery site.

Courtesy of Lincolnshire County Council, The Collection

Welton le Wold, Stone Age axe, Palaeolithic, Allan Straw, Chris Alabaster